Coolboats to admire

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,637
3,278
Kohimarama
William Atkin designed 39'4" LOA yawl, Destiny.

Beautiful restoration.

transom1.jpg

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,597
What? Slow because she has a full keel with drag? I daresay her average speed is probably much better than you would expect.

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,791
288
WLIS
Looks very good above the water but is there any way he could

have drawn a slower underbody? Maybe a couple of bilge keels for taking the ground?
If he was going to depart from a traditional model, what should he keep and what should he change? Would it make sense to put a gaff cutter rig on a J-35 hull? The biggest contributor to making the boat faster, would be to make it a lot lighter. Would that make it a better liveaboard?

In the video, it was mentioned that the boat was built in 2 years, 9 months. That's astounding. Most home-built 15' skiffs take longer. Perhaps the design was facilitated that.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,789
12,412
Great Wet North
I'm sure the Maestro could draw a Night Runner type underbody under that "upperbody" and make a real sleeper. He's also done modern gaff rigs - Jacaranda?

A good designer can give you all the style, charm, pirate factor etc. AND modern performance instead of just building an antique.

 
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fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,597
The question really is, "why"? That underbody gives the boat sailing qualities that some people find appealing.

 

Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,942
1,333
Yeah, I thought the same thing Jon, why not a NIGHT RUNNER?

But if you study the drawings of that boat you will see that is huge below. That's a big interior and perfect for living aboard. Any attempt to make the boat lighter woulod reduce that volume. Can't have that for a live aboard.

As for performance, there are a few areas where that boat will suffer. It's not going to go to weather very well by modern standards. It's probably a high deadrise section so it could be initially tender. It's going to be hard to make go in light air with all that wetted surface. It's never going to pop up over the bow wave and surf down a wave. With all that rocker and weight in the ends I can see it hobbyhorsing along in some sea conditions.

But on the plus side I suspect this design might have a balance to its personality that makes it a lovable boat to sail. So you beat with an AWA of 40 degrees, on a good day. In the light stuff you patiently tweak and fuss and work and trim to keep the boat moving. In a blow you snug down the rig and enjoy a big rocking chair ride. If we look at what "high performance" is these days it is a foiling AC cat. If you can relax and get your head in the right place I'm not sure a VMG difference of 4,25 knots to 5.8 knots really makes a difference if the ride is pleasant.

It's a bit like when you pass a restored Model T lurching down the road at a sedate 28 mph. You fly past the in your amorphous Japo whatever at 60 mph. But I always wish I was driving the Model T.

Reminds me a bit of Spike preferring to drive his old VW bus while he owned a new Scion XB. Who needs heat?



 
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Mr. Ed

Super Anarchist
3,006
341
40 degrees would be great with a gaff rig and a traditional hull design.

Do you do coaching?

E

 

blackjenner

Super Anarchist
Yeah, I thought the same thing Jon, why not a NIGHT RUNNER?

But if you study the drawings of that boat you will see that is huge below. That's a big interior and perfect for living aboard. Any attempt to make the boat lighter woulod reduce that volume. Can't have that for a live aboard.

As for performance, there are a few areas where that boat will suffer. It's not going to go to weather very well by modern standards. It's probably a high deadrise section so it could be initially tender. It's going to be hard to make go in light air with all that wetted surface. It's never going to pop up over the bow wave and surf down a wave. With all that rocker and weight in the ends I can see it hobbyhorsing along in some sea conditions.

But on the plus side I suspect this design might have a balance to its personality that makes it a lovable boat to sail. So you beat with an AWA of 40 degrees, on a good day. In the light stuff you patiently tweak and fuss and work and trim to keep the boat moving. In a blow you snug down the rig and enjoy a big rocking chair ride. If we look at what "high performance" is these days it is a foiling AC cat. If you can relax and get your head in the right place I'm not sure a VMG difference of 4,25 knots to 5.8 knots really makes a difference if the ride is pleasant.

It's a bit like when you pass a restored Model T lurching down the road at a sedate 28 mph. You fly past the in your amorphous Japo whatever at 60 mph. But I always wish I was driving the Model T.

Reminds me a bit of Spike preferring to drive his old VW bus while he owned a new Scion XB. Who needs heat?


Bob,

I'm kinda curious about something in that drawing. Is there any particular reason the mast bends forward like that?

 

Veeger

Super Anarchist
Yeah, I thought the same thing Jon, why not a NIGHT RUNNER?

But if you study the drawings of that boat you will see that is huge below. That's a big interior and perfect for living aboard. Any attempt to make the boat lighter woulod reduce that volume. Can't have that for a live aboard.

As for performance, there are a few areas where that boat will suffer. It's not going to go to weather very well by modern standards. It's probably a high deadrise section so it could be initially tender. It's going to be hard to make go in light air with all that wetted surface. It's never going to pop up over the bow wave and surf down a wave. With all that rocker and weight in the ends I can see it hobbyhorsing along in some sea conditions.

But on the plus side I suspect this design might have a balance to its personality that makes it a lovable boat to sail. So you beat with an AWA of 40 degrees, on a good day. In the light stuff you patiently tweak and fuss and work and trim to keep the boat moving. In a blow you snug down the rig and enjoy a big rocking chair ride. If we look at what "high performance" is these days it is a foiling AC cat. If you can relax and get your head in the right place I'm not sure a VMG difference of 4,25 knots to 5.8 knots really makes a difference if the ride is pleasant.

It's a bit like when you pass a restored Model T lurching down the road at a sedate 28 mph. You fly past the in your amorphous Japo whatever at 60 mph. But I always wish I was driving the Model T.

Reminds me a bit of Spike preferring to drive his old VW bus while he owned a new Scion XB. Who needs heat?

Bob,

I'm kinda curious about something in that drawing. Is there any particular reason the mast bends forward like that?
Too much head stay tension and no back stay! Everyone thinks you just crank on the head stay tension to go upwind! Sheesh...!
 
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fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,597
I won't speak for Bob, but his cartoons are a lot of fun because of the inside jokes, like that one, that show up.

 

Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,942
1,333
Oh boy.

To start with it's a cartoon. Just a cartoon. I am trying to impart a feel, like an art deco poster.

But way back in the days of gaff rigs and long booms that overhung the transom, a standing backstay was impossible. The boom would not clear the backstay. Common.

So the solution was cap shrouds swept aft. You could also use running backstays. But the probleme with swept shrouds was they inhibited the boom from going all the way out. So some degree of compromise was used and the result being insufficient aft vector to keep the masthead in line. It bent forward under the load of the headstay. Not good but just reality.

Somebody questioned the detail of the bowsprit curving down. This too was common and probably an attempt to prevent the bopwsprit from curling up under load if a dolphin striker was not used. Note this slight bend in my cartoon sprit.

When I was a kid one of my favorite boats was Andy Goodwin's 23' Garden cutter, bult by Andy on Vashon Island. Bill added spreaders and swept them aft, then carefull drew in the mast with the tip bent forward. That image has stuck with me. I was an imnpressionable kid surround by great impressions.

40 degs AWA? That was a guess. I'm not sure I have ever sailed an ultra full keel gaff cutter. But with some good sails I think it could be achieved. It could be done. Not sure it would result in the best VMG though.

Yes I offer coaching. But it is very expensive and I make the kids cry.

I think yes. My cartoons are full of "inside jokes".

 
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Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,942
1,333
Fast:

Your comment about inside jokes reminds me of some musical works by the great composers that are full of "inside musical jokes".

I listen to the pieces and I don't hear anything funny. I just hear nice music.

But then, I don't have Mozart's ear, or Haydn's or Brahms. Shit I don't even have Hummel's ear. I'm oblivious to the musical nuances of the day, the time in which they were written. What joke?

I think my cartoons are fun art for anyone. But I also think it you know quite a bit about yachts and yacht design there are some hidden "jokes".

For instance look at how I swelled out the chord of that ultra high aspect ratio rudder. The loads on that stock wouold be enormous so I lengthened the chord at the top, the root, so I could have a build up of carbon fiber there and not end up with too thick a thickness ratio.

I find that fucking hilariass.

 
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Mr. Ed

Super Anarchist
3,006
341
Has anyone built it? Would be lovely - even as a model

e

 
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Bob Perry

Super Anarchist
31,942
1,333
Are you talking about my cartoons?

I am waiting for the movie offer.

The cartoons are jst me having fun. And giving a very personal gift to a good friend.

 




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