Coolboats to admire

Sailbydate

Super Anarchist
11,599
3,264
Kohimarama
Is there a rule that prohibits them from making the center keel canting in a way that lifts the bulb from the water?
My understanding is that to race with monohulls, she has to have a fixed keel (canting) and be capable of self-righting. But I seriously doubt any keel boat will want to race with her (as will be self-evident from that video). How could you even give her a rating?

In the recent Porto Cervo Rolex Cup, she raced in her own division. Makes sense. Multihulls don't race against monos and this is one stage further on from there!

Designer, Mark Mills is on record as saying she could race without her ballasted keel fitted, when they've mastered her control systems. I imagine she'd be even quicker without several tons of lead under her. But not for ocean passages, I'm thinking!!!
 

NZK

Anarchist
907
657
Roaming
My understanding is that to race with monohulls, she has to have a fixed keel (canting) and be capable of self-righting. But I seriously doubt any keel boat will want to race with her (as will be self-evident from that video). How could you even give her a rating?

In the recent Porto Cervo Rolex Cup, she raced in her own division. Makes sense. Multihulls don't race against monos and this is one stage further on from there!

Designer, Mark Mills is on record as saying she could race without her ballasted keel fitted, when they've mastered her control systems. I imagine she'd be even quicker without several tons of lead under her. But not for ocean passages, I'm thinking!!!
Yep, the fixed keel is to comply with current ratings requirements so that it can actually enter existing regattas. It also gives inherent stability at low speed/stationary so they don't need 100% shadowing by a chase boat (like the AC boats did).

The Maxi Worlds in Porto Cervo is still going on - on the first day Flying Nikka retired and still came 1st in class!

I got told that that at the moment they're primarily using the 'autopilot' when sailing - this means the foil trim/ride height is left to the computer with the crew steering and trimming. They do sail it in full manual but it's a pretty steep learning curve.
Take-off is currently around 16 knots of boat speed which is typically achieved at about 9 knots TWS but they've been experimenting with a Code 0 to try and get a quicker lift-off.

The owner and build team of Flying Nikka purposefully capped the build budget to try and create something that will tempt other Maxi owners - they could have gone much further down the development path (and the guys involved would have LOVED to carry on down that rabbit hole) but they chose not to so that they're more likely to get interest and create a class to sail against. Obviously it's all relative, this is still out of touch for 99% (99.9%?) of us but I personally think it's awesome - whether people are fans of foiling or not this just all part of the same evolution of the sport/past time we love.
 

Priscilla

Super Anarchist
4,282
2,890
My only remaining photo of one of the sweetest yachts to grace the sparkling Waitemata Minerva by Collings & Bell sadly lost on a Pacific reef.
IMG_2789.jpeg
 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,563
1,577
Laramie, WY, USA
Kudos to Doug though, he pushed and pushed foils and many thought he was nuts
The long history of prophets & prophecy suggests bug-eyed monomania is not incompatible with random hits. Blithering futurists have claimed since the 1940s that we'd all commute via personal jetpack. Now that, some eighty years on, such jetpacks sorta/kinda exist in limited demonstration numbers, I guess we can credit those fanboys with ... being right? -ish?

Here is Roger Bacon writing c. 1270:

Machines for navigating are possible without rowers, so that great ships suited to river or ocean, guided by one man, may be borne with greater speed than if they were full of men. Likewise cars may be made so that without a draught animal they may be moved cum impetu inaestimabili, as we deem the scythed chariots to have been from which antiquity fought. And flying machines are possible, so that a man may sit in the middle turning some device by which artificial wings may beat the air in the manner of a flying bird.
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
The long history of prophets & prophecy suggests bug-eyed monomania is not incompatible with random hits. Blithering futurists have claimed since the 1940s that we'd all commute via personal jetpack. Now that, some eighty years on, such jetpacks sorta/kinda exist in limited demonstration numbers, I guess we can credit those fanboys with ... being right? -ish?

Here is Roger Bacon writing c. 1270:
When am I getting my flying car? :D We were promised the Jetsons by now.
 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,563
1,577
Laramie, WY, USA
When am I getting my flying car? :D We were promised the Jetsons by now.
Flying cars exist also, and presumably any enthusiast with enuf dosh could buy one today.



The practicality is rather more complicated. Ten minutes driving in a city or on a public highway should convince any thinking person that 99 out of 100 drivers on the road should under no circumstances be allowed anywhere near a flying car.:eek: Autonomous flying pods? Maybe that could be a thing, tho the sort of traffic routing and mechanical reliability involved could be as well employed for high-density autonomous ground transport, with far less expenditure of energy. And you still gotta park those pods someplace when you reach Bosthattadelphia.

Foiling sailboats, same way. They are substantially faster than non-foilers. The tech is cool. Those who care, care intensely. But that's not why I like sailboats.
 

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