Coolboats to admire

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,787
849
Nova Scotia
My guess is it’s the calorifier.
I have always been amused and supportive of British terminology. Having driven British cars in my youth, I embrace descriptive terms such as 'damper', 'fascia', 'windscreen', and 'demister'. But 'calorifer' has always struck me as awkward. Sure the word has something to do with heat and it is admirable for its brevity, but it doesn't really describe the full function of a hot water tank (which is not just about adding calories to water but also about storing it). And while the more descriptive 'storage calorifer' is only two words, more letters are required than for 'hot water tank'. I shall be petitioning the OED for an amendment forthwith...
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
7,089
1,465
worldwide
I have always been amused and supportive of British terminology. Having driven British cars in my youth, I embrace descriptive terms such as 'damper', 'fascia', 'windscreen', and 'demister'. But 'calorifer' has always struck me as awkward. Sure the word has something to do with heat and it is admirable for its brevity, but it doesn't really describe the full function of a hot water tank (which is not just about adding calories to water but also about storing it). And while the more descriptive 'storage calorifer' is only two words, more letters are required than for 'hot water tank'. I shall be petitioning the OED for an amendment forthwith...
I’ve only heard that term used to describe a water heater

I suppose the term is more precise since it differentiates a hot water storage tank from a water heater

it translates well to other languages ..calentador, calorifier, calorifique
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,258
2,894
I feel I have a good background in $1 sailboats, with one in the family. These days I'm getting more experience in the $5,000 sailboat, with our sons (and boat partner) Pearson Vanguard. So I loved seeing this 1960 International 500 reviewed on Captain Q, for $4,500.

I know the International 500 from a friend that owned Willins boat, DRIFT. A Dedood design that were built in wood. I didn't know they did a few(?) our of glass. It's a classic design, very 60's S&S looking.

You'll be jarred when you see the steel plate below, covering the mast step. O.k., that needs some exploration. But I think Q is right on to sort of give these details a, "meh",... and take in the whole package.

Why? Because the $5,000 32' sailboat experience is about, sailing. Do you really want to go sailing in a boat big enough to coastal cruise, overnight on, sailaway for a few months, but you have little $?

Or are you just a tire kicker complaining that sailing is too expensive?

There is stuff to do. Those deck stepped masts (like my sons $5K Vanguard) have to be noodled. But they are straightforward. Check it out, if satisfied, offer $3K. Yours.

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,258
2,894
They got to Captain Q!!! In video advertisements :eek:

Amazing. :D
Yeah. How does that work? We have another guy we watch that does a cooking show. He's great! But he does a blaht on a sponsored product in each of his 15+- vids. But I can FF through it if I don't want to hear about it. Are they doing these on the sly? Hows this work? You can't FF through the Youtube ads (I just mute).
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
Yeah. How does that work? We have another guy we watch that does a cooking show. He's great! But he does a blaht on a sponsored product in each of his 15+- vids. But I can FF through it if I don't want to hear about it. Are they doing these on the sly? Hows this work? You can't FF through the Youtube ads (I just mute).
There must be some PR company out there that specializes in product placement in any youtube channel that has ANY traction. Q only has 70k subs. But I guess it hit the threshold. lol.
 

Crash

Super Anarchist
5,195
1,100
SoCal
I feel I have a good background in $1 sailboats, with one in the family. These days I'm getting more experience in the $5,000 sailboat, with our sons (and boat partner) Pearson Vanguard. So I loved seeing this 1960 International 500 reviewed on Captain Q, for $4,500.

I know the International 500 from a friend that owned Willins boat, DRIFT. A Dedood design that were built in wood. I didn't know they did a few(?) our of glass. It's a classic design, very 60's S&S looking.

You'll be jarred when you see the steel plate below, covering the mast step. O.k., that needs some exploration. But I think Q is right on to sort of give these details a, "meh",... and take in the whole package.

Why? Because the $5,000 32' sailboat experience is about, sailing. Do you really want to go sailing in a boat big enough to coastal cruise, overnight on, sailaway for a few months, but you have little $?

Or are you just a tire kicker complaining that sailing is too expensive?

There is stuff to do. Those deck stepped masts (like my sons $5K Vanguard) have to be noodled. But they are straightforward. Check it out, if satisfied, offer $3K. Yours.


I'd forgotten just how classically good looking International 500s are. I wasn't aware any fiberglass ones had been built either. If only I was retired and back on the East Coast. But that day is 4 years away, give or take.
 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,185
2,819
North Carolina
I feel I have a good background in $1 sailboats, with one in the family. These days I'm getting more experience in the $5,000 sailboat, with our sons (and boat partner) Pearson Vanguard. So I loved seeing this 1960 International 500 reviewed on Captain Q, for $4,500.

I know the International 500 from a friend that owned Willins boat, DRIFT. A Dedood design that were built in wood. I didn't know they did a few(?) our of glass. It's a classic design, very 60's S&S looking.

You'll be jarred when you see the steel plate below, covering the mast step. O.k., that needs some exploration. But I think Q is right on to sort of give these details a, "meh",... and take in the whole package.

Why? Because the $5,000 32' sailboat experience is about, sailing. Do you really want to go sailing in a boat big enough to coastal cruise, overnight on, sailaway for a few months, but you have little $?

Or are you just a tire kicker complaining that sailing is too expensive?

There is stuff to do. Those deck stepped masts (like my sons $5K Vanguard) have to be noodled. But they are straightforward. Check it out, if satisfied, offer $3K. Yours.


That would be a great candidate for an electric re-power. Hmmmm.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,258
2,894
That would be a great candidate for an electric re-power. Hmmmm.
Right or wrong for their use, I think that step is the future for a new generation of old boat owners. It's not just environmental, I predict it is the loss of familiarity with IC engines.

Blame the cars, not the kids. There has been nothing under the hood of my cars that I can do much with anymore, and I've pulled a few engines (marine and road) in my lifetime. Everybody did 'back then'.

I think that gave you the attitude it requires to work on marine diesel engines, most of which are ancient and resemble those old, long gone, vehicles.

I'm sort of coaching, sort of spectating the course of action on my son's balky Yanmar in their $5,000 sailboat.

They are weighing the amount of $$ they want to spend on paying someone to begin an unpredictable repair path.

They're both well employed with great incomes and ample leisure time.

He went skiing this weekend instead of beginning the long journey into an ancient art of a dying technology, spent under shrink wrap in 20F.

Meanwhile, they still sail it, engineless, without too much concern. As part of a dying breed of shade tree mechanics, I'm ok with their priorities.

As a side note, they listened to me on their stinky head system. That was an easy choice for them. It's in the landfill. :)
 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,185
2,819
North Carolina
There has been nothing under the hood of my cars that I can do much with anymore
How true. When I look at a new car, I don't even look under the hood anymore.

On the way to my boat, I pass a small used car lot. About two years ago, there was a red Triumph Spitfire soft top on the lot., probably around 1970. The place was closed, so I decided to have a closer look. It was a temptation. I called my mechanic about it, and he said they really were not able to work on a car like that.
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
69,977
13,186
Great Wet North
Not many people around who know carbs anymore - they were last used new about 35 years ago.

Point & condenser distributors even longer. Try and find a working mechanic who knows what dwell angle even is let alone how to set it.
 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
7,089
1,465
worldwide
How true. When I look at a new car, I don't even look under the hood anymore.

On the way to my boat, I pass a small used car lot. About two years ago, there was a red Triumph Spitfire soft top on the lot., probably around 1970. The place was closed, so I decided to have a closer look. It was a temptation. I called my mechanic about it, and he said they really were not able to work on a car like that
Same with most marine equipment …you know what it does , but you have no idea how it works

the typical are PLCs instead of common relays and switches that you understood

this stuff is even invading small production boats
 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,730
1,798
Laramie, WY, USA
How true. When I look at a new car, I don't even look under the hood anymore.

On the way to my boat, I pass a small used car lot. About two years ago, there was a red Triumph Spitfire soft top on the lot., probably around 1970. The place was closed, so I decided to have a closer look. It was a temptation. I called my mechanic about it, and he said they really were not able to work on a car like that.
Hmmm. I guess I find the new stuff less intimidating, perhaps b/c I've wrenched on both sides of the technology divide. I had an F-150 with straight six, pushrods, and ice-prone carb; replaced clutch packs, swapped in a reman engine, fixed every.fricking.part of its electrical system (it's a Ford!), wheel bearings, yada yada. I've done a valve job on a 1980 Subaru Boxer, which is about as basic as engine tech gets: monkey copy of the 1930s VW engine.

I'm also perfectly comfortable rooting around in modern cars: swapping ECUs, flushing sealed automatic trannys, diagnosing electric window & door lock modules, tracking down codes with flow charts and an OBD2 scan tool. A good deal of modern mech skill is that way. It's also mostly bolt-to-bolt, replace rather than repair, b/c that's what works both on assembly lines and in auto service shops. You don't fix an ignition module, or buff its contacts with emory cloth, or have a friend rev the engine while you twist the distributor to find the sweet spot. You use your scan tool to read the EIM fault, swap a new one in, and if needed program it for the proper cam angles.
 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,185
2,819
North Carolina
Très cool, n'est-ce pas? AHAHHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHA. Ne pas! AHAHHA.

Bonne nuit.

- Ville de Taureau


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