Corsair 36 structural defect? If so, remedied in C37?

CommonBlue

New member
11
3
Key West
I’m about to go see a 2008 C37 carbon that’s for sale and, in researching the boat yesterday, I stumbled on a 2008 post by a representative from Corsair announcing the arrival of the C37 Carbon. In the beginning of the thread, Ian Farrier commented that a C36 he inspected “had a major structural failure in the beam system.” He went on to say, “I found the structure not to my standards, with a major load path that I always use missing.” The Corsair rep responded and neither admitted or denied that a defect existed. In speaking with the person who sold me my last and present Corsair (2005 C31CC) and who is helping me find a C37, he mentioned that C36s did have some sort of design defect of the sort Mr. Farrier mentioned, but assured me that Corsair addressed the problem in the C37. Does anyone know what, specifically, the problem was that the C36 had and how, specifically, it was addressed in the C37? Given that the C37s have been around now for quite some time, is anyone aware of the structural problems identified by Mr. Farrier in the C36 occurring in the C37? Any other problems? For example, someone mentioned in that same 2008 thread that he heard of an issue with a rudder breaking off on a C36. Has that occurred on the C37 to anyone’s knowledge? I realize that the C37 and the C37 carbon may have different problems crop up due to the differences in the build and/or materials used in construction, but I’m still interested in information about problems with the regular C37 that have occurred since it’s introduction.
 

eric1207

Anarchist
809
269
Seattle
Have you searched the fct forum. https://fct.groups.io/g/main/topics
If you are good at searching I'm sure there is stuff in there as I considered a C36 once and found stuff at the time, maybe here also. I am not a good researcher I just stumble upon stuff. Wes on this forum will sing C36 praises and I have no reason to doubt him.
 

basketcase

Fuck you second amendment
4,035
1,023
a long way from home
Have you searched the fct forum. https://fct.groups.io/g/main/topics
If you are good at searching I'm sure there is stuff in there as I considered a C36 once and found stuff at the time, maybe here also. I am not a good researcher I just stumble upon stuff. Wes on this forum will sing C36 praises and I have no reason to doubt him.
Wes the covid denier? Theres reasons to doubt him ....
 

eric1207

Anarchist
809
269
Seattle
We are talking boats here to help out fellow sailors. His experience with Corsairs is relevant, especially C27 & 36's. I'd prefer to leave the other stuff alone, or if you please in PA.
 

Tomfl

Member
Just before COVID-19 hit I was considering buying a C36 in Germany and asked about the issue of delamination. The story started when a C36 was bashing to windward in blue water for a couple of days or so when the cross beam support delaminated on the main hull. Ian weighed in that this was due to a design flaw and Corsair came up with a plan to deal with the delamination issue. Thing is all boats have their limits and bashing any boat to windward is always hard on the boat. The C37 was suppose to fix the C36 issue and I have not seen any reports it did not. As mentioned Wes has owned a C36 and never had any issues with it; in fact he really liked it. He answered my questions to my satisfaction about the C36 being a decent boat that would meet my needs.

Point is no boat ever gets better than the ocean and plenty of boats of all flavors have had breakdowns bashing to windward. The trick is to get one that meets your needs. I would not try and round the three great capes with a C36 or a C37; but the same is true for a whole lot of other boats. My take is for 99% of peeps the C37 would be a fine boat. But you really need to explain what you intend to do with the boat. My intent was to use the C36 as a European Canal boat and basically live on the wall in Paris in the summer and maybe some sailing in the Med. But when COVID-19 hit the EU was basically shut down and my plans were derailed.

Bottom line is you need to figure out what you are really gonna do with a boat; not what you think you will be doing. For day sailing, weekend cruises, and coastal cruising the C37 is a great choice. Not sure about racing rating but it would be a fast boat even if the corrected time was not so great.
 

Wess

Super Anarchist
We own a C36. Its been sailed hard; zero issues. Best bang for the buck of any boat we have ever owned and we have owned a lot - large and small; mono, cats and tris. Don't believe everything you read on the internet (especially from a competitor). If you want a concrete idea of how much we love the boat... after a lighting strike a few years ago we could have walked away and made a $80K profit on our investment. We opted to keep the boat and sail it to this day. Will sail it tonight actually (third time we will be out this week and its only Wednesday. Rarely on this or the F-boat forums these days due to work and healthcare obligations for parent living with us.
 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
Chatting to someone that was there at the time and they said fault only got to about the second boat, first 2 fixed and the rest never had a problem with a small redesign. Farrier was all bitter and twisted he didnt design it so went to town to rubbish it.
 

plywoodboy

Super Anarchist
1,027
136
Brisbane
Not the best place to dirty the Farrier name when your source of information is "Chatting to someone".
Ian Farrier was certainly not bitter and twisted but did go to great lengths to maintain the brand that serves us all so well when we sail, buy, and sell his magnificent designs. I will continue on his behalf for the same reason.

Ian reported to me the cases of C36 boats losing masts due to poor bulkhead design and construction, so it made sense for him to separate himself from the design when some prospective buyers were told this was an F36 when it was a C36.

I worked for Corsair at a boat show in Oz featuring the first C36 built here and it seemed like a reasonable boat, just a stretched F31 with no consideration given to aesthetics. Owners here had problems steering them and one added inconvenient but effective under-float skeg rudders.

Peter H
 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
Not the best place to dirty the Farrier name when your source of information is "Chatting to someone".
Ian Farrier was certainly not bitter and twisted but did go to great lengths to maintain the brand that serves us all so well when we sail, buy, and sell his magnificent designs. I will continue on his behalf for the same reason.

Ian reported to me the cases of C36 boats losing masts due to poor bulkhead design and construction, so it made sense for him to separate himself from the design when some prospective buyers were told this was an F36 when it was a C36.

I worked for Corsair at a boat show in Oz featuring the first C36 built here and it seemed like a reasonable boat, just a stretched F31 with no consideration given to aesthetics. Owners here had problems steering them and one added inconvenient but effective under-float skeg rudders.

Peter H
Sure he should of distanced himself but how many actually had a problem before the factory altered the engineering plus fixed the existing boats?
My post was helping the Corsair legacy.
 
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Wess

Super Anarchist
Chatting to someone that was there at the time and they said fault only got to about the second boat, first 2 fixed and the rest never had a problem with a small redesign. Farrier was all bitter and twisted he didnt design it so went to town to rubbish it.
That is about right from my perspective as somebody that researched the boat, talked with Ian and Corsair and owners, and then bought and sail (still) one.
 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,194
5,442
De Nile
It's been a long time, but I test sailed one of the ones with a failed socket, and the fix was shite. So shite, that specific boat ended up totalled out. I recall a few years later it being for sale, mast out, for pennies on the dollar.

That said, that was just one boat. Folks said the design was changed in later boats, and I have to assume it was the same for the C37.

However, if I was in the market, I'd look at the Antrim 40 that Multihuler has for sale instead...
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
789
338
Victoria, BC
While I really like the flexibility the easy trailerability of the C36 gives me, that Antrim looks like a sweet ride. Great find!!

I've talked to a couple of people who have sailed the Antrims and apparently the flat bottom planes well but also pounds upwind.

I also really love the trailerability of the Farrier/Corsair designs!!!

With that in mind why not go all-out with this Bosgraaf 50 footer with the Farrier folding system!!!



Might need a big truck and trailer...
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
789
338
Victoria, BC
I've talked to a couple of people who have sailed the Antrims and apparently the flat bottom planes well but also pounds upwind.

I also really love the trailerability of the Farrier/Corsair designs!!!

With that in mind why not go all-out with this Bosgraaf 50 footer with the Farrier folding system!!!



Might need a big truck and trailer...

^^^This FB link doesn't display properly on all devices so pasting a screen shot:

1662087984132.png
 

Wess

Super Anarchist
I've talked to a couple of people who have sailed the Antrims and apparently the flat bottom planes well but also pounds upwind.

I also really love the trailerability of the Farrier/Corsair designs!!!

With that in mind why not go all-out with this Bosgraaf 50 footer with the Farrier folding system!!!



Might need a big truck and trailer...

Yea we are aware of that boat. Its another nice one for sure. But honestly for us (ma and pa in 60s coastal cruising) the C36 works fantastic. Not too big and not too small. Really the only one that ticked all the boxes we wanted to tick. Different strokes for different folks but for us its a perfect boat. We spent years looking for a cruising cat (to replace our F27 that we had downsized to). Friend had suggested we look at the bigger tris and indeed that was a perfect path (for us).
 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
789
338
Victoria, BC
Yea we are aware of that boat. Its another nice one for sure. But honestly for us (ma and pa in 60s coastal cruising) the C36 works fantastic. Not too big and not too small. Really the only one that ticked all the boxes we wanted to tick. Different strokes for different folks but for us its a perfect boat. We spent years looking for a cruising cat (to replace our F27 that we had downsized to). Friend had suggested we look at the bigger tris and indeed that was a perfect path (for us).
I've never been on a C36 but it sounds like it's really in a sweet spot in terms of size.

I owned a 42' monohull for 12 years and it was pretty much at the upper limit of what I thought was readily manageable by a couple that actually sails the boat. It had a masthead rig and the #1 Genoa was about 700 square feet, so pretty difficult to manhandle and do sail changes without a bigger crew. A fractional rig would have been easier to handle. Sure couples do sail bigger boats, but we would fly a spinnaker in 20 knots of wind, and lots of couples on bigger boats seem to spend more time motoring because the sails and loads get unwieldy.
 

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