Corsair/Farrier Anarchy

bacq2bacq

Anarchist
603
254
Ottawa
The arrow is where my hip struck the ama with the full weight of my body dropping 3' thru that gap in the circle.
Ouch.  You are right, Eric, this is F-31 stock, and there are no padeyes nor grommets, but also pretty tricky to mis-step, the nets are so close and tight in there.  Now the *old* nets we had were a disaster...

@RedTuna  Haha, yeah, when I saw that I totally cringed, too.  :) That is one of the "working slips" at Nepean Sailing Club and we only ever had the boat there that one time, for a few hours while I was test-fitting a custom dessicating head.  About 1" clearance total, 1/2" each side!  Normal berth was at the T-section at the end.  I'm deranged, but not crazy.

 

 

bacq2bacq

Anarchist
603
254
Ottawa
I'm in the market for a new screacher and an asymmetrical spin to wrap around a Seldon GX15 torque-rope top-down furler I have.  Interested in opinions/options for the F31, new or used.  I'm in Ottawa, Canada, cruise, never raced this boat (but might give it a try).  Main is currently pin-top dacron UK Halsey, and the foresail is ~110% roll-furled dacron.  Cheers.

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,802
430
Benicia, CA
I'm in the market for a new screacher and an asymmetrical spin to wrap around a Seldon GX15 torque-rope top-down furler I have.  Interested in opinions/options for the F31, new or used.  I'm in Ottawa, Canada, cruise, never raced this boat (but might give it a try).  Main is currently pin-top dacron UK Halsey, and the foresail is ~110% roll-furled dacron.  Cheers.
Best bet is to go to your local sailmaker if you have one, and explain what you want to do better than you do now.  You might want to consider getting another furler for the screacher since it is cumbersome switching and when racing, it is "nice" to be able to furl one and deploy the other quickly.  

 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
F24 nets also had that gap where a couple crewpeople injured themselves (and I did as well) during races.  Current boat (SeaRail) also has gaps but the ama's are in places where a person would not normally step (way aft or forward of cockpit (and no foredeck)).  It'd be a worse hassle if you had to relace the whole tramp to the vaka each time (which is something SeaRails that fold/unfold on the trailer instead of on the water do).  You can make it quicker, though, with a soft shackle and some dyneema lace.  
C24 has lacing there front and back, so no problem

 

Loose Cannon

Super Anarchist
1,234
65
Planet Earth
Soft shackles run through the beam connections quickly remedy that risk of a walkthrouhg.  Length and diameter vary by boat, but it is not terrible since you only need 1 or two in order for it to be less risky and still leave you space to run your screacher strap through.

 

eric1207

Anarchist
851
290
Seattle
Gspot, Nice you got the cobwebs out early in the season, and having a good sail.   

You probably saw my post just up thread, however I can't pass up an opportunity to be pedantic:  I shudder every time I see a gap in a net.  I just want folks to be aware of how much it hurt when I stepped though one once. I know many have sailed for years with no problem but a split second of distraction, unawareness or off balance and it could be a big ouch.   Consider lacing it up, especially if you have crew unfamiliar with nets and multihulls. 

Maybe I'll make it to a BCMS Port Browning rendezvous sometime and see you there.  

Peace and fair winds. 

Screen Shot 2022-04-07 at 8.08.22 PM.png

 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
823
370
Victoria, BC
Gspot, Nice you got the cobwebs out early in the season, and having a good sail.   

You probably saw my post just up thread, however I can't pass up an opportunity to be pedantic:  I shudder every time I see a gap in a net.  I just want folks to be aware of how much it hurt when I stepped though one once. I know many have sailed for years with no problem but a split second of distraction, unawareness or off balance and it could be a big ouch.   Consider lacing it up, especially if you have crew unfamiliar with nets and multihulls. 

Maybe I'll make it to a BCMS Port Browning rendezvous sometime and see you there.  

Peace and fair winds. 

View attachment 503232
Yeah I saw that - it sounded horrible and I hope you’re on the mend!

I’m trying to figure out some kind of method where it tensions the laces as you unfold the boat so you don’t have to re-lace every time. It’s not a big deal to lace if you leave the boat unfolded for a while, but when you dry sail every little thing helps.

It would be great to connect if we have the opportunity!

 

plywoodboy

Super Anarchist
1,028
137
Brisbane
Many Farrier owners dry sail and either

1. Leave it unlashed and "everyone" knows not to walk there....

2. A different coloured lashing for that section is loosened and retied or cleated each time.

3. A few even use shock cord plus 2.

I am a 2 because a few boats ago I was a 1 and my brother put his leg through the hole on my F24 at the time, all the way to the bruised tentacles. He has not returned.

Peter H

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,802
430
Benicia, CA
OH, so THAT's how you are supposed to use that UK bag.  I used that bag until it wore out then made my own (without velcro), then started furling everything over the years with the F242.  I'm just chiming in here because I typically (with crew) hoisted first (so crewmember on net could keep it from filling behind the main) and Then pulled the tack to the sprit.  When we did it the other way around like you did, occasionally a gust or something would fill the foot/leach as we pulled the tack out, then it (once or twice), would get wet (shrimp) if we weren't quick to hoist.  Point being, you cannot shrimp if you hoist first, then tack out.  

 
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MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,802
430
Benicia, CA
Many Farrier owners dry sail and either

1. Leave it unlashed and "everyone" knows not to walk there....

2. A different coloured lashing for that section is loosened and retied or cleated each time.

3. A few even use shock cord plus 2.

I am a 2 because a few boats ago I was a 1 and my brother put his leg through the hole on my F24 at the time, all the way to the bruised tentacles. He has not returned.

Peter H
Now I'm a 1 because I single hand.  Rather than lash, has anyone ever purchased some other netting and kept it on the aka, then just pull that out and cover the hole, might be quicker than lashing.  Frankly surprised Sunrise doesn't sell 4 pieces to cover the holes.  

 

WetnWild

Super Anarchist
1,320
56
Brisvegas
Many Farrier owners dry sail and either

1. Leave it unlashed and "everyone" knows not to walk there....

2. A different coloured lashing for that section is loosened and retied or cleated each time.

3. A few even use shock cord plus 2.

I am a 2 because a few boats ago I was a 1 and my brother put his leg through the hole on my F24 at the time, all the way to the bruised tentacles. He has not returned.

Peter H
I’m a 1(a) as I lash right to the corner but with the tension up tight when folded. On my weekly unfold it is a little looser in the corner but definitely no hole. That’s on an F22 so maybe a better setup than the earlier designed boats. 

 

SailingTips.Ca

Feigns Knowledge
823
370
Victoria, BC
Many Farrier owners dry sail and either

1. Leave it unlashed and "everyone" knows not to walk there....

2. A different coloured lashing for that section is loosened and retied or cleated each time.

3. A few even use shock cord plus 2.

I am a 2 because a few boats ago I was a 1 and my brother put his leg through the hole on my F24 at the time, all the way to the bruised tentacles. He has not returned.

Peter H
So far we’ve been 1 because we typically double-hand, with one person on the helm, and the other person (me) running around the boat doing everything else. In this video we had three because it was a longer race. We also don’t typically take people out. All of that said, it would be nice to eliminate that safety liability, and I was also wondering the same thing as Thom with the net cover. Or even some kind of hook-based system. 

OH, so THAT's how you are supposed to use that UK bag.  I used that bag until it wore out then made my own (without velcro), then started furling everything over the years with the F242.  I'm just chiming in here because I typically (with crew) hoisted first (so crewmember on net could keep it from filling behind the main) and Then pulled the tack to the sprit.  When we did it the other way around like you did, occasionally a gust or something would fill the foot/leach as we pulled the tack out, then it (once or twice), would get wet (shrimp) if we weren't quick to hoist.  Point being, you cannot shrimp if you hoist first, then tack out.  
Definitely need to watch out for shrimping, so you want to ensure that too much doesn’t pull out of the bag before the hoist so you need to keep one eye on the sail at all times in that state. Not pulling the tack all the way to the end of the sprit increases the chance of an hourglass so everything is a compromise. 

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,802
430
Benicia, CA
 All of that said, it would be nice to eliminate that safety liability, and I was also wondering the same thing as Thom with the net cover. Or even some kind of hook-based system. 
Been noodling about it and it should be pretty easy to make a cover that is quick to deploy/take off.  You need a length of net that is as long as the "unnetted" length of the beam...basically the length of the drumstick on the trailer sticking up that doesn't have net attached.  It can be permanently attached to that   Then you need about a foot along the main hull edge (outboard a little) and a length along the other side to make a triangle.  Should indent the sides of the triangle that go over the tramp about an inch or so so it makes a catenary and will remain tensioned along the edge and attach a plastic hook on the corner to hook onto the tramp.  Issue being you can't find ultracross netting by the yard (or at least I haven't--you can buy some white tramp material from sailrite-only need a yard and it doesn't have to be that sturdy, just want a misstep to keep from going through to the gonads).  I'd want to finish the edge in something a different color so folks won't trip over it--don't want to trade one hazard for another.  

 
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deminimis

Member
142
84
Orygun
I've been busy, with lots more to do.  Boat came with 230v.  Keeping it in place, but with just two outlets/circuits.  It doesn't hurt to dream.  Installing 120v soon (Blue Sea 360 panel and my new wire arrive today).  New transducer going in (one in there never worked for me and it's an oddball Airmar from days of yore).  New Tacktick wireless analog display arrives today (boat is a hodgepodge of different era Tacktick components, and the multi was the cheapie wired version, so it had to go).  This will allow me to remove the instrument cowling quickly and store it all inside (I use quick pins to attach the instrument cowling to the cabin roof).  Will also allow me to stick the works in the sun once in a while when the boat is in storage (to keep the batteries up).  Pricey bugger and it was hard to put that in the cart, but decided to go for it (bounced back and forth for a while between switching to B&G or staying Tacktick/Raymarine.).  Then there's the major project that has been eating up every free moment over the past month.  Although a lot of work ahead, I'm starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.  Goal has been to have it ready by May 1, but it may drag on a week or two longer. 

 


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