Corsair/Farrier Anarchy

I have a Code/Screecher (for the bow sprint) and no blocks out on the amas.  Suppose I'll need to order some up. How are you folks with the larger tris (28-33) running your sheets?  I'd think a block near the front ama/beam connection, then blocks straight out from the cowl winches.  Then again, that may to be too far outboard.  So, looking to see how others are doing it to cut down on some of the trial and error (pics please).  Heck, are you even using blocks? Perhaps low friction rings are a better solution? Thanks!!!


Screacher and tweaker.png

Tweaker Hardware.JPG

Tweaker and Screacher MEDIUM SIZE.JPG

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,866
463
Benicia, CA
yep most sheeting for most angles ends up over the tramp so barber hauls everywhere
Agreed if racing with crew, but KISS if not racing or no crew. 

If the sail was made for the boat, the sailmaker "should" have made the foot and leach lengths so that sheeting from the back beam would be good for most conditions (however, there are no guarantees that the sailmaker knows or has measured your boat these days).  A spinnaker would sheet from outboard and outside the shrouds; a screacher would sheet inside the shrouds.  If sheets go to a winch, the line has to come from below the winch or you get overrides.  Where along the beam you put the screacher turning block will depend (that day) on what windspeed (more outboard for more wind).   The SMG of the screacher tells you what AWA the sail will be most happy with-smaller the SMG, the closer to the wind the sail will work when the luff is tight (and closer to the CL you will want to sheet from)--but you can loosen the halyard to make it run deeper (assuming it is roller furling with torque rope inside the luff).  

For someone still learning their boat and sails (or sailing in a new area), I'd leave the haulers off until I feel the need for them.  

 

hoektron

Member
234
126
Gulf Coast, TX
Slightly off topic, but I took a sail on a friends F28 last night and what an absolute blast. It was just a fun sail with a bunch of people but still felt fast blasting along upwind at 7-8kts and 11kts when we cracked off downwind.   First time on a tri and man what a fun time!  You guys know whats up :D

 

Sailabout

Super Anarchist
Agreed if racing with crew, but KISS if not racing or no crew. 

If the sail was made for the boat, the sailmaker "should" have made the foot and leach lengths so that sheeting from the back beam would be good for most conditions (however, there are no guarantees that the sailmaker knows or has measured your boat these days).  A spinnaker would sheet from outboard and outside the shrouds; a screacher would sheet inside the shrouds.  If sheets go to a winch, the line has to come from below the winch or you get overrides.  Where along the beam you put the screacher turning block will depend (that day) on what windspeed (more outboard for more wind).   The SMG of the screacher tells you what AWA the sail will be most happy with-smaller the SMG, the closer to the wind the sail will work when the luff is tight (and closer to the CL you will want to sheet from)--but you can loosen the halyard to make it run deeper (assuming it is roller furling with torque rope inside the luff).  

For someone still learning their boat and sails (or sailing in a new area), I'd leave the haulers off until I feel the need for them.  
The screacher is really the one to outhaul from the main hull track, but like you said perhaps only if racing. It makes a  huge difference.
I have added a one foot strop to raise the block from the track on a 24 and that works great.
Allows it to come in when sheeted hard and will ease out a little without using a barber haul.
Stops the sheet rubbing through the deck as well like it does on a stock boat.

Also use that screacher block to outboard sheet the jib in big wind when cracked off, makes the boat lots safer to handle

 
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deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
Over the weekend, I changed out the net attachment lacing on one side with dyneema.  Holy crap what a difference!  No squeaks!!  I also changed up the front and aft setup.  The lines are permanently attached up to the last four attachment eyes (last four before reaching the hull).  The final four are secured with seperate line.  Speeds up the lacing and unlacing when splashing or packing up the boat.

 
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Loose Cannon

Super Anarchist
1,236
65
Planet Earth
RE: Barber haulers.  I have a snatch block and a LFR on a soft shackle so that I can move the attachment point around (jib outboard front beam netting locations, screacher maybe all the way out to the front beam/float eye, etc.) Currently it is single rope to a snatch block, but I could just as easily run the rope through the snatch block to create a 2:1 with the end run back out to the soft shackle.  My real question is - do you run the sheet end of the barber back to the windward jib winch across everything, or has someone come up with a convenient single pully/cleat solution?  I didn't do a block and tackle with cleat option because I though it would be a challenge to sheet on and release the cleat if it is on leeward float, etc.  But I may be wrong.

 

deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
Too windy last weekend to splash the boat (gusting to 50 on Sunday, apparently).  So piddled around with this and that. 

Let's talk gooseneck/furling handle:  Although I have slab reefing, I still have the furling gooseneck and handle (handle taped to the mast).  It's ghetto and it does not inspire a ton of confidence.  Have any of you improved on this and if so, let's hear/see some details.  There's a somewhat recent viddy of a 37.  I like that setup quite a bit. Here's a screenshot of it.  A setup along these lines (kind of a pun there) would be sweet.  Thanks!

Screenshot_20210824-082831_YouTube.jpg

 
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deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
Okay you meddling kids, let's see if you can solve this mystery.  PO is traveling, so info is spotty.  I only have one of these.  He says it's for the Code 0, but he never really used the sail.  That's the info I have.  Well, it was in the Code 0 sailbag, but I have no clue how or why.  I have both sheets wrapped around the sail already.  The furler pins to the bow sprint, I have the continuous line for the furler (w/ tandem fiddle block) and I definitely have a halyard.  However, I do need to buy a pair of blocks for the sheets as he did not have these, so perhaps that's a clue (I think I may go Harken T2 off the rear beam padeyes, but who knows).  Anyway, I can't imagine what this line is used for.  Perhaps tensioning the working sheet?  Seems a hassle switching it from side to side (I'm sailing a fat river, so perhaps not a hassle on the big open).  Anyway, that's just a guess.  What say ye? Thanks! 20210823_174501.jpg

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,866
463
Benicia, CA
Have you verified that the sheets that are around the sail are long enough?  That looks like a sheet for one side and he may have furled the sail with one sheet.  A lot of folks use a sheet on either side instead of one continuous sheet.  That line certainly looks unused so it also may be just a convenient place to store an extra line and blocks.

 

deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
I have two sheets.  Haven't rigged this sail, but I'm going to assume they are long enough.  Lots of line wrapped.  It's different than the line shown in the pic.  My continuous line is the furler line.

 

deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
"That line certainly looks unused so it also may be just a convenient place to store an extra line and blocks."  A pretty good guess.  I'm starting to lean that way.  In fact, I think that is the same line as one of my halyards (not near the boat, but if memory serves, it's the halyard that runs through a cheek block on the mast and likely the one I'd use for the C0).  Well, I'm going to say mystery solved (for now).

 

MultiThom

Super Anarchist
1,866
463
Benicia, CA
 In fact, I think that is the same line as one of my halyards (not near the boat, but if memory serves, it's the halyard that runs through a cheek block on the mast and likely the one I'd use for the C0).  Well, I'm going to say mystery solved (for now).
Do you recall the improvement you experienced with changing the lacing lines to dyneema?  When you need to do so, replace your yacht braid halyards with something less stretchy.  A less expensive alternative is to splice a dyneema line onto the yacht braid starting above where it runs through the clutches (that's so you don't have to replace your clutches to hold something smaller in diameter).  

 

prskier17

New member
The PO may have rigged that as a tack line for your Code 0.  If your continuous furler is rigged like mine it's not possible to attach the sail tack without either retracting the sprit or (somehow) climbing out onto it.  A tack line would allow you to simply bring the furler and sail to the bow of the boat.   The snatch block would attach to the sprit in place of the furler, the regular block would attach to the snap shackle at the bottom of the furler, and then the line would simply be tied around the sprit with the other end going to a cabin top clutch.  Now you have a 2:1 tack line and rigging it this way prevents the entire furler assembly from being able to spin, which you don't want.  It's like this image except the fairlead is replaced by the standard block.  

Ronstan 21.png

 

deminimis

Member
143
85
Orygun
Thanks.  I'll do some investigating tonight when I get home.  If the furler pin is held in place with a normal cotter pin (as opposed to a circle, reusable cotter pin), then I think we can say he (well dealer) may have rigged something similar to above.  I just can't recall for sure.  Also, I'll check for wear/marks on the bowspring bobstay tab dealio to see how it matches up.  There should also be a wear mark from the line where tied around the bowsprint. He said he didn't use the Code, but it was a demo for two years prior to him buying it, so it appears to have been used in the past. I do think the furler simply pins to the tab (so it would require a removable/reusable circular cotter pin), but now I need to check to make sure.   If not, then there's the likely answer.

 
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