Couple Cruise for 1000 Days

Go Left

Super Anarchist
4,602
223
Seattle
AFAIK, Google Earth isn't updated daily, especially the high-res images.

And especially the areas of low interest (except to us) like the middle, south, east, maybe a little north Atlantic and/or the coastal rivers and harbors of Liberia.

And....now that I think of it....where's Motorcycle. He's the one that started this fine mess.

 
Ok Lads and Lasses, I've got a stupid suggestion but you're gonna have to bear with me.
I have to preface this with the admission that I am the next closest thing to a Luddite that could post on a board. I do know lotso tech savvy folks though, enough to get me here and on the rest of the interweb (and I gotta tell ya, for a country boy it sure is an eyeopener), so I know that some real time satellite stuff is available. For an example, how it is possible for people to look for Steve Fosset ?

So my question is this - why can't we take the position of the floating train wreck, shit, lets say say 10/1, and compare it to Google earth's image of that day? See if the mofo is actually there? Pick any day for those of us less connected (like me) and match it up to his coordinates, and see if they're really there? Can't one of y'all cipher this out? Cus I gotta tell yus, I don't think they are where they say. I think... Well, it's not important what I think but this is a case for McGruff the crime dog if ever I saw one.

And BTY Boomhitmeintheass, you are the first person on SA I have had to use my childlike computer skills to put on ignore. Congradulations motherfucker.
Thanks for that, Jimmy.

Courage derived from the vicious pack, eh?

I don't know you either, but hello anyway.

Google Earth isn't updated very regularly in rural areas, neither is the imagery in the boondocks usually better than 5 or 10 or so meter resolution, which blurs fairly badly at the kind of search altitudes you'd like to use for locating an object on the ground in the desert. Nevada is particularly problematic, being mostly rural and mostly public range land or military bombing ranges. There's some interesting viewing in Google Earth of the Nevada test site and environs. Cities are updated in higher resolution down to a meter or so resolution. But the desert imagery is just not useful for detailed searches. So much for the literal answer to your question.

The Google earth ocean imagery of the open ocean is a blue-shaded pixel simulation of the seafloor, not actual images of the ocean, except near ports and big cities, near shore. For bonus fun, open Google earth and go up to the north pole, then zoom in all the way to sea level and see what happens.

 

kent_island_sailor

Super Anarchist
26,185
4,349
Kent Island!
Was that "rescue mission" just some BS to annoy the RoidHovians or did it really happen?

Assuming the reported GPS postitions are true, it wouldn't seem very hard to find something that moves at 2 knots.

 
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bbl

Anarchist
735
4
Norway
kick_in_the_balls_2005-04-13.jpg


 

NautiGirl

Super Anarchist
8,972
3
New Scotland
The Google earth ocean imagery of the open ocean is a blue-shaded pixel simulation of the seafloor, not actual images of the ocean, except near ports and big cities, near shore. For bonus fun, open Google earth and go up to the north pole, then zoom in all the way to sea level and see what happens.
I am, but all I see is an orange dot. I expected to at least see Santa Claus.

 

WuWei

Member
303
0
Ok Lads and Lasses, I've got a stupid suggestion but you're gonna have to bear with me.
I have to preface this with the admission that I am the next closest thing to a Luddite that could post on a board. I do know lotso tech savvy folks though, enough to get me here and on the rest of the interweb (and I gotta tell ya, for a country boy it sure is an eyeopener), so I know that some real time satellite stuff is available. For an example, how it is possible for people to look for Steve Fosset ?

So my question is this - why can't we take the position of the floating train wreck, shit, lets say say 10/1, and compare it to Google earth's image of that day? See if the mofo is actually there? Pick any day for those of us less connected (like me) and match it up to his coordinates, and see if they're really there? Can't one of y'all cipher this out? Cus I gotta tell yus, I don't think they are where they say. I think... Well, it's not important what I think but this is a case for McGruff the crime dog if ever I saw one.

And BTY Boomhitmeintheass, you are the first person on SA I have had to use my childlike computer skills to put on ignore. Congradulations motherfucker.
Nettles, Believe me, I'm still working on it (Satcom is my job.) Yes, the technology is there. However, the cameras on the satellites have to be moved remotely from the earth station to spot in to the particular location. This is one of the reasons Google Earth is not up-to-date with imagery. :( Most of the satellite imagery is utilized in intelligence gathering. It is VERY expensive to do, especially since real-time imagery eats up a huge amount of bandwidth (utilizing the entire resources of the transponder). A lot of agencies use UAVs (like RC planes and helos) with cameras for cheaper real-time imagery. I'd love to find out where those bastards really are at, but the hubby's RC heli collection is limited and we can't afford our own Predator or Global Hawk. But, I'm still researching alternative satty sources with my buddies at other government agencies. If we were retired, we'd be out there looking for those scammers in a heartbeat- but Reid and Soanya are probably anchored off some remote island, smoking the herb and eating moldy pasta.

 

NautiGirl

Super Anarchist
8,972
3
New Scotland
Wow...Reid likes 'em young. This article is from May 2001. His wife was 28 at the time, making her 35 now, to Reid's 55.

Laurence and Reid StoweMay 29, 1999

When Reid Stowe and Laurence Guillem married, I wasn't sure they would survive their honeymoon — literally. They planned to leave one week after the wedding to spend 200 days at sea, sailing a small handmade boat in the South Atlantic.

As it turned out, their motor broke underneath the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. But they kept going anyway, living on sprouts Mrs. Stowe grew in their tiny kitchen, fish they caught and salted, pasta, dried beans and rice.

"The South Atlantic was very peaceful," Mrs. Stowe said. "On one side, we were 1,000 miles from South Africa and the same from South America. That's scary, and at the same time it made us feel like the first woman and man on earth."

In gales and storms, they would be out on the deck together, sometimes all night long, with enormous waves all around them. "We have to function together as a crew," Mr. Stowe said. "If our love breaks down, we put our physical lives at risk."

In the worst storm, they encountered 155- mile-an-hour gusts. "I didn't see how the boat could survive those winds," said Mr. Stowe, now 49. "We were preparing to die together."

They arrived back in New York on Dec. 17, 1999, and lived on their boat for a year, spending a lot of time in their Grand Salon, a room under the deck where everything — the dining table, walls, bookcases, beds — is intricately carved with dragon heads and ghostly faces meant to scare away evil spirits at sea.

Then, on Jan. 20 of this year, they left for another adventure. They sailed to Bermuda, then to Trinidad, through one winter storm after another. In one of them, the boat turned over three times.

"Dying together on the boat would be a romantic end, in a way," said Mrs. Stowe, now 28. But I'm not ready to die. I always think there is a way to survive."

They did survive, and returned to New York two weeks ago, again tying their boat up to Pier 23. Now, they are planning another voyage, 1,000 days at sea.

"We love to be together," Mrs. Stowe said. "Reid is the first man I ever met who liked to be with me all the time. After a while, most people just get tired of each other, but I think it's because they have a boring life. We have no money, but we don't have a boring life."
 

NautiGirl

Super Anarchist
8,972
3
New Scotland
Forgive me if this has been posted already, but I don't recall seeing it. It's PRICELESS though.




Odysseys

Extra Socks — Check. French Girlfriend — Check. Three-Year Supply of Kitty Litter — Um ... Check.

In one of history's more audacious acts of voyaging, Reid Stowe is preparing to hoist his sails, slip his mooring, and disappear for 1,000 days at sea.

By Tim Zimmermann




Even in a port of call as exuberantly eccentric as the New York waterfront, Pier 63 on Manhattan's West Side stands out as an oddity. This afternoon, for example, the dock is covered with black rubber shower mats, upon which a troupe of sweaty, spandex-clad jazz dancers is lifting weights and practicing its choreography. At the head of the pier is the Chelsea Equestrian Center, where mounted debutantes are earnestly practicing dressage for $100 an hour. Down the boardwalk, there's a four-story open-air driving range where Wall Street traders exorcise their frustrations by savagely thwoking Top-Flites in the direction of New Jersey. And at the center of this extravaganza, gently rocking back and forth in the brown waters of the Hudson, bobs an old-fashioned, gaff-rigged schooner captained by a man so aberrant, so unorthodox, so astonishingly offbeat that he makes the circus around him seem downright run-of-the-mill.




Sometime next spring, Reid Stowe, 46, will slip his lines and pilot his 70-foot ship through the Verrazano Narrows on a sailing voyage of enviable purity and singular strangeness: 1,000 days at sea without resupply, without visitors, and in a striking twist, without ever, under any circumstance, venturing within view of shore. For almost three years, his only companions will consist of one French girlfriend, two stray cats, and the dragon mask he dons when he smears his body with rainbow-colored paint and cavorts around deck in wild bouts of shamanistic dancing. "I am into exploring the unknown, expanding the mind," Stowe asserts in a soft Carolina drawl that drops your blood pressure about 20 points. "I'll be out of sight of land longer than any human has ever been."




As overblown as that assertion may sound, no voyager in history, from Vasco da Gama to the Mir astronauts, has shunned contact with terra firma for the length of time Stowe plans to be at sea. (The existing record is held by the Australian sailor Jon Sanders, who from 1986 to1988 circled the globe three times in 657 days.) Stowe intends to better this distinction by sailing in large loops through the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans as he circumnavigates in an eastward direction, plotting a course that assiduously keeps him well offshore the entire time. He calls his expedition the Mars Ocean Odyssey, because 1,000 days is the expected duration of a journey to the red planet.




The venture has piqued the interest of several NASA researchers because keeping astronauts healthy and fending off terminal boredom are two key challenges for future space voyages. "It's a good analog for a long-term space mission," says Frances Mount, a lab manager at the Johnson Space Center's flight crew support division, which is hoping to get funding that would enable its researchers to treat Stowe as a floating lab rat. "NASA pays a lot for [isolation] studies in the Antarctic and Arctic," continues Mount, "but I think this voyage is closer to the real thing."




Judging strictly by his appearance (dirty blond hair, frayed shorts, bare feet), Stowe may seem more like a dockside vagrant than a modern-day Magellan. But there is plenty of saltwater running through his veins. At the age of 19, he tacked together a 27-foot plywood catamaran and shepherded it across the Atlantic twice. After eventually wending back to his parents' summer home in Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina, he spent a year and a half in their yard bringing to life his personal vision of the ultimate deep-ocean sailing ship. He launched the result in 1978, named it Anne (after his mother), and has lived aboard it ever since.




Boasting stout wooden masts and rugged construction, the 60-ton steel-and-fiberglass schooner is unlikely to set any speed records. Its interior panels — which are dominated by a whimsical menagerie of hand-carved genies, mermaids, and dragons — are also a far cry from standard yacht decor. But like the man who fashioned her, Anne is built to go places: Stowe has taken the little ship to Antarctica, around Cape Horn, and last year, on a successful 100-day trial run for his Mars Odyssey.




The roots of his present quest trace back to his encounter with one of sailing's most romantic heroes, the legendary Frenchman Bernard Moitessier, who seized the attention of the sailing world back in 1968 while competing in the first single-handed race around the globe. Shortly after rounding Cape Horn and well placed to post the fastest time, Moitessier found himself so sea-smitten that he couldn't bear turning north for England and the finish. So he simply kept on going, cheerfully circling the bottom of the world one more time. After 37,455 miles, he finally dropped anchor in Tahiti (where Stowe eventually caught up with him) and rocketed to cult-figure status among long-distance sailors. "Meeting him had a big influence on me," recalls Stowe. "He said you can just go on, live out there, and not think about the shore."




Like his mystical mentor (Moitessier was convinced that dolphins served as his guardian angels), Stowe seems to have mastered the knack of treating a voyage as both performance art and metaphysical statement. When not tending to his ship's needs, he is reading Jung, meditating on the Tibetan Book of the Dead, or practicing tantric yoga on his gimbaled bunk. He also plans to stow bags of earth in Anne's cavernous hold so that he can keep himself "grounded" by occasionally stretching out on deck beneath a pile of dirt. "I continuously live in a spiritual state at sea," he says by way of explanation.




For sustenance, Stowe and his partner, Laurence Guillem, 26, will mainly consume dried oats, nuts, and fruit. The couple will also fashion salads from the sprouts they cultivate in a makeshift but thriving greenhouse tucked next to the portholes of Anne's stern cabin. There is a small water purifier aboard, but it will likely get little use because Stowe, a maniac for self-sufficiency, has always managed to inveigle more than enough potable water by catching rain.




Experts seem a bit taken aback by the venture. "I've never heard of anything so ambitious," says Phil Crowther, archivist at the Museum of Yachting in Newport, Rhode Island. "There's a first time for everything, but I think I'd lay odds against him making it." Stowe, however, seems to harbor no such doubts — supremely confident (isn't that one of the cult leader characteristics???), it seems, not only in his seamanship, but also in his ability to wrest meaning and contentment from the emptiest of oceans. "It's about controlling your mind and your heart," he says, glancing in the direction of a Chelsea dance club whose throbbing techno-pop sound system is reverberating off Anne's steel hull. "To be ultimately seaworthy, we have to be able to live at sea without anything on shore bringing us back."

 

joeboy

Member
199
8
Nunya
Been lurking since the beginning of this show, but never really had anything to say.

But Im a little surprised no one has done any comparisons between this farce and Jon Sanders 658 day triple circumnavigation. Didnt really find much on the ol' web after a cursory search, and his book "Lone Sailor" appears to be out of stock at Amazon, but heres a pic of his boat the Parry Endeavor. One can only hope it wasn't powered with sprouts and cheese...

(horrifyingly enough though, it would appear there was a "fairly substantial collision" on this trip too...)

so anyway, anyone know more?

b80d458d94df5cc5442900ef465eeded.jpg


 
"The couple will also fashion salads from the sprouts they cultivate in a makeshift but thriving greenhouse tucked next to the portholes of Anne's stern cabin."

I wonder what reaction you'd get if you offered the Ex Mrs Stowe a sprout salad these days?

 

nolatom

Super Anarchist
3,479
492
New Orleans
Sorry mate, ur wrong. Been over the 1000days site and found what I had quoted. I dont give a damn abouy Reid and Co. and simply reading this thread for my own entertainment. And, sorry, English is not my native language, I wanted to say that I appreciate what you guys are doing. now, seems this was not coming through. Cheers,

MSafiri

That's just strange enough to make sense. I'd need to see closer-up photos to see if any abrasion scrapes rather than just a sprit (bobstay anywhere?) that failed in tension from overload. But then again for that I'd need to care enough for it to matter.

Yeah, container ships do hit yachts out in mid-ocean at night, though usually they don't. Someone investigated aboard the Maersk Dunedin I'd reckon (I do the same for ships and their underwriters sometimes), but isn't talking on web pages. I don't either, if it's "my" ship, it's bad form. Reid on the other hand talks a lot, that's how he keeps donors happy (?) and donations coming in.

 
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