Craigslist Finds

Alan Crawford

Super Anarchist
1,372
641
Bozeman, Montana
Force 5 on Long Island (Sayville) for $300 (new sail last year).

https://longisland.craigslist.org/boa/d/sayville-amf-force/7304368775.html

Screen Shot 2021-04-22 at 11.12.08 AM.png

 
That Force 5 is free and the new sail is what you are paying for.  I have always liked the look of those.  I have never sailed one.  Seems like that would be a good boat to put in a truck when you don't have the time or inclination to deal with a trailer...Here in NorCal trailers are 55 mph max, and you must drive in the rightmost lane, which means that every damn exit and entrance will back you up.  So there is a necessity for avoiding trailers when possible, though I presently have and use three.  I sold a glass FD like the one in Boca Raton.  It's a lot of work to put something back together when you didn't take it apart.  If you already have a Dutchman laying around, maybe not too bad...

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Great Red Shark

Super Anarchist
8,398
597
Honolulu
The Force 5 isn't bad - it's a bit heavier than it should be and it suffers from having a terrible AMF/Sunfish rudder that has more flex than cooked pasta,  but the rest of the boat is alright.  That said,  these are all 30 years old now.

Car (or truck) -topping would be a lot better than 'throw it in the bed' -- as very few truck beds accommodate a 14' hull.

 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
44,113
9,538
Eastern NC
Yes, I raced a Force 5 for a few years. They're good little boats, I liked it more than the Laser. It's got a bit more horsepower, bigger rudder, better sail controls (well, the Laser upgraded all that stuff).

And yeah, they have not improved with age.

FB- Doug

 

tillerman

Super Anarchist
5,422
2,659
Rhode Island
The Force 5 isn't bad - it's a bit heavier than it should be and it suffers from having a terrible AMF/Sunfish rudder that has more flex than cooked pasta,  but the rest of the boat is alright.  That said,  these are all 30 years old now.

Car (or truck) -topping would be a lot better than 'throw it in the bed' -- as very few truck beds accommodate a 14' hull.
Yeah, it's not bad. A bit stodgy, like the Laser. But definitely worth every penny of $300.

 

rcbrds

Member
66
38
Olympia
Per the seller, both the hull and deck are wood.  His use of the word gelcoat may not be correct - not sure of his boat construction knowledge.  
 

He looked for a builder’s plate but could not find anything.   
That boat was clearly modified. It has features of a 70's boat and also that of a 80's boat.    I believe I found it in this issue of Trapeze.  Look for the project in here:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1gsnLl1kiD4-mjxVPQtjii2JnCvqTSGR7/view   So the answer is a  wood Bob Hoare hull with a KDV (KDE) deck!  A pretty cool boat.  Also, the flat square box in one of the pictures may be more divinycell to complete the aft false bottom.

 
rcbrds, thanks for that article.  It is your opinion that the boat in the article is the FL boat?  We have a Bob Hoare that is grounded at the moment in the backed up line for repairs and projects with my boats--I am going to glass and carbon fiber in and out.  We live in the Sierra Foothills but I have a place in TN that needs (another) boat for use down in New Bern...I wish I had a week off.  As we all do.  

 

craigiri

Super Anarchist
8,434
143
Sarasota - W. MA.
Since I bought it in this thread - my "craigslist" lady slipper is "driveway rigged" and I figured I'd ask if I am doing it right. The sail was brand new. Seems simple enough. I guess I could add a block down on the centerboard area? 
It seems to me that a porta-seat on the floor of the vessel toward the stern might be a good place to sail it from? That would keep the weight low and the boom out of the way and not jack the bow high up?
 

I bought it for rowing but will sail a little just to mess with it. If it sails well - then I will sail more!

IMG_4310.JPG

IMG_4309.JPG

 

craigiri

Super Anarchist
8,434
143
Sarasota - W. MA.
The Force 5 isn't bad - it's a bit heavier than it should be and it suffers from having a terrible AMF/Sunfish rudder that has more flex than cooked pasta,  but the rest of the boat is alright.  That said,  these are all 30 years old now.

Car (or truck) -topping would be a lot better than 'throw it in the bed' -- as very few truck beds accommodate a 14' hull.
Someone should write a short book on dinghy designs and the basics of it and how they have improved (or not). When you look at the ads you see so many from 1950, 1960 designs! Was is just that they had naval design down pat and that's pretty much (other than materials) as far as you can go (foiling aside) ?

Are there really many innovations left in these classes other than said materials and slight tweaks? 

If I look at aircraft, which are similar in many ways, they are all just tweaks - and they have unlimited $$ to throw at design and good reason to do so. More innovation in aircraft seems in the engines than in the bodies, although they surely have figured out more and more that overkill is not needed (computers and experience make it a more sure thing). 

It's easy to see why the market for new Dinghies is mostly club involved - when someone can buy a knock-around 40 year old model for 1K. 

As with mostly ALL sailboats, many you find are old. The market for new ones has been poor for decades so there are not a lot of newer "used" boats around. 

 

rcbrds

Member
66
38
Olympia
rcbrds, thanks for that article.  It is your opinion that the boat in the article is the FL boat? 
No, I'm almost sure the boat in the article is the boat in New York.  Where else would you find that combination of hull and deck?  

The Boca Raton boat is hard to identify from just the bottom. I think the beautiful sailing photo may be a different boat because on the FD website it says "The other photo is an oldie but goodie from Bob’s earlier adventures in FD sailing."  Classifieds of www.sailfdusa.org

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,733
1,113
San Diego
Since I bought it in this thread - my "craigslist" lady slipper is "driveway rigged" and I figured I'd ask if I am doing it right. The sail was brand new. Seems simple enough. I guess I could add a block down on the centerboard area? 
It seems to me that a porta-seat on the floor of the vessel toward the stern might be a good place to sail it from? That would keep the weight low and the boom out of the way and not jack the bow high up?
 

I bought it for rowing but will sail a little just to mess with it. If it sails well - then I will sail more!

View attachment 439511

View attachment 439512
Weight placement - try to stay in the middle (for/aft)  No pic of the tiller, so can't see if it's easy to do that. Sail rigging: the bridle across the transom wants a block/ferrule to let the mainsheet slide across easily. Mainsail clew needs a strop thru grommet around boom to keep boom snug to sail. Main tack needs a adjustable cunningham. Mast needs to be tied down to boat.

Just copy a Laser

 

craigiri

Super Anarchist
8,434
143
Sarasota - W. MA.
Another Comet Class - restored 1973, looks like a decent job done! 

https://westernmass.craigslist.org/boa/d/dalton-comet-class-16-ft-one-design/7295517010.html

Not cheap - but I suppose for those who truly know what they are looking at (that is, someone who can verify that all restoration is perfect and not "cover-up"), they could be a nice item. But only "if". 

It might be my New England bias but when I read the description and see the boat and understand the Yankee Mindset (and there are exceptions), this may just be one of the good ones. On the other hand you have Joe Blow just about everywhere fixing up "project boats" and unless you can interview the person doing it and know what you are looking at, it could be a real shit job! 

The nice job on the trailer bunks speaks to me...that he cared about this boat. 

1348848381_ScreenShot2021-04-25at11_27_51AM.png

 
Last edited by a moderator:




Top