Craigslist - Not mocking

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
42,281
8,597
Eastern NC
I’m kinda partial to the latest 5.5’s anyway  The older ones are beautiful in their own right, but the new ones just seem to have more appeal (to me) 
I raced a ~1940 6M for a while, fun boat. For as heavy as it was, it was tiny. We usually sailed it 3 up, 5 was definitely a crowd. Beautiful is right. I think the 5.5s have some differences in the proportions but they are certainly eye-catching and worth keeping.

- DSK

 

SemiSalt

Super Anarchist
7,752
269
WLIS
The O'day Tempest.  A Rhodes design that I always thought presaged the modern "classic" daysailer like the Alerion.  Although the Tempest had very traditional lines in keeping with its contemporaries (the overhangs and swoopy sheer line), it had a modern split underbody with a fin keel and spade rudder.  I looked at two or three of them when boat shopping about 25 years ago, and none of them were worth trying to save even back then.  The construction quality didn't seem high to start with, and they didn't age well.  This example is about the best I've seen in pictures or in person.  By all accounts, a sweet sailer, especially for its time.

https://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/d/westbrook-fun-for-new-or-experienced/7449797292.html
I owned the prototype of the Tempest class back around 1971. It was fun to sail, but in any kind of breeze it threw an astonishing amount of spray back onto the crew.

 

valcour2

Member
51
36
My wife’s family had a tempest when she was little, and she has fond memories of overnighting on it with her dad and sister.  
 

 
The "Pandemic Regret" selling has begun.

Real talk, always surprises me that even with exchange rate and sales tax it is far better for me to buy a boat in Puget Sound than anywhere in BC. The same vessel, same year, also with the inboard removed and glassed and a recent bottom job, is listed for $15k CAD in Nanaimo. Double what this is listed for.

Canadian opinions on what their junk is worth are insane.

pandlol.PNG

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,173
964
The Gorge
Maybe so... I did my periodic procrastination YachtWorld search for "the next boat" yesterday and there seemed to be quite a lot of new listings that fit my criteria.  A lot of them were obviously "we-bit-off-a-project-bigger-than-we-could-handle."  But without looking closer, sometimes it's hard to find the line between "project" and "bargain."

 

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,823
1,090
Buena Vista, Colorado
Maybe so... I did my periodic procrastination YachtWorld search for "the next boat" yesterday and there seemed to be quite a lot of new listings that fit my criteria.  A lot of them were obviously "we-bit-off-a-project-bigger-than-we-could-handle."  But without looking closer, sometimes it's hard to find the line between "project" and "bargain."
Yea, like this one, too good to be true. For the hell of it I contacted the broker to see what work remains. At least he was straight up, sent me the survey findings. It's a project.

https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/1987-robert-perry-south-pacific-42-7280650/

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
2,887
1,973

bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,823
1,090
Buena Vista, Colorado
It would be nice to know what the issues are, but that looks like a very, very nice boat. Lots of older equipment, but an excellent layout and a really good design.
Give the broker a call, he'll send the report. Multiple places of wet core, broken loose tabbing and lots more. Wrong computer right now or I could look at the rest.

Really nice boat, caught my eye for sure. If it was a minor project I'd be all over it.

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
2,887
1,973
Give the broker a call, he'll send the report. Multiple places of wet core, broken loose tabbing and lots more. Wrong computer right now or I could look at the rest.

Really nice boat, caught my eye for sure. If it was a minor project I'd be all over it.
The wet core is problematic, depending on what and where it is.

 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,953
1,561
Canada
The wet core is problematic, depending on what and where it is.
But for $65k, bid lower, doesn’t seem terrible.  I’m certainly not up on the used boat market, but that looks like nothing a few ten k notes wouldn’t bring back up?   I mean, I guess, what do you expect for a $65k ask for a 42 footer?  
 

Have a $100k budget is the answer, I guess?

 
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bmiller

Super Anarchist
5,823
1,090
Buena Vista, Colorado
But for $65k, bid lower, doesn’t seem terrible.  I’m certainly not up on the used boat market, but that looks like nothing a few ten k notes wouldn’t bring back up?   I mean, I guess, what do you expect for a $65k ask for a 42 footer?  
 

Have a $100k budget is the answer, I guess?
Which is probably what this boat would be worth in decent condition. 

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
2,887
1,973
Boy, that article brought back memories. I had forgotten that Peter Rachtman was involved in that project. I knew him when he had So-Pac, which was the first introduction to the NZ marine industry for a lot of American consumers.

He was a real proponent of and spokesman for the NZ boat industry, particularly when it came to export to the US.

I am surprised to see problems associated with Divinycell core, unless it is a core bonding issue, which could be a fatal problem.

 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,953
1,561
Canada
Boy, that article brought back memories. I had forgotten that Peter Rachtman was involved in that project. I knew him when he had So-Pac, which was the first introduction to the NZ marine industry for a lot of American consumers.

He was a real proponent of and spokesman for the NZ boat industry, particularly when it came to export to the US.

I am surprised to see problems associated with Divinycell core, unless it is a core bonding issue, which could be a fatal problem.
Not knowing much at all about fibreglass boat building - but I feel like I should in case I buy a glass boat one day (even though buying and maintaining another boat again is a terrifying prospect :) ) - by “core bonding issue” you mean the core delaminating/delaminating from the skins?  

I was under the (naive) impression that only balsa and wood cores were ever a problem (b/c of rot).

 

accnick

Super Anarchist
2,887
1,973
Not knowing much at all about fibreglass boat building - but I feel like I should in case I buy a glass boat one day (even though buying and maintaining another boat again is a terrifying prospect :) ) - by “core bonding issue” you mean the core delaminating/delaminating from the skins?  

I was under the (naive) impression that only balsa and wood cores were ever a problem (b/c of rot).
I'm talking about the failure of the bond between the core and the fiberglass skin or skins. Depending on the type of construction, you typically use either a resin-rich layer, such as glass mat, against the core, or a glue film layer when bonding to cell-type cores such as nomex or aluminum. Those are typically used in high-tech racing boats, not in cruising boats.

Core-bonding failures are different from core rot problems resulting from water saturation, which typically happens around poorly-sealed penetrations in balsa cored construction or ply-wood cored decks.

 

mckenzie.keith

Aspiring Anarchist
499
152
Santa Cruz
Not knowing much at all about fibreglass boat building - but I feel like I should in case I buy a glass boat one day (even though buying and maintaining another boat again is a terrifying prospect :) ) - by “core bonding issue” you mean the core delaminating/delaminating from the skins?  

I was under the (naive) impression that only balsa and wood cores were ever a problem (b/c of rot).
Sometimes people draw a distinction between de-bonding of core to skin and de-lamination of the skin itself. I am sure PVC core materials such as divynicell don't rot or spread moisture as fast as balsa, but moisture is still not supposed to be in there and it can still cause problems such as progressive destruction of core/skin bond or whatever. All cored boats need to manage moisture intrusion into the core. Also, it is imossible to build a light rigid boat without either a core material or a large amount of stringers and other reinforcement on the inside of the hull.

 

Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,478
1,482
Laramie, WY, USA
I'm talking about the failure of the bond between the core and the fiberglass skin or skins. Depending on the type of construction, you typically use either a resin-rich layer, such as glass mat, against the core, or a glue film layer when bonding to cell-type cores such as nomex or aluminum. Those are typically used in high-tech racing boats, not in cruising boats.

Core-bonding failures are different from core rot problems resulting from water saturation, which typically happens around poorly-sealed penetrations in balsa cored construction or ply-wood cored decks.
We did have some localized foam core bonding failures due to moisture penetration + freeze/thaw cycling. It was a Chicago/Wisconsin boat before it came to us. Repair was made somewhat challenging due to the strange 'eye loop' method Albin used to tie the skins together.

Tho it was the solid wood, probably some kind of fir, serving as core under the genoa tracks that had completely turned to gravy.

 
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