Craigslist - Not mocking

aremmes

Member
65
29
Reading, PA
I wonder what issue the engine has that made the seller give up on this Formosa 43.


00s0s_iw0sPCLXS5qz_0CI0q3_1200x900.jpg
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,546
2,549
Those Taiwanese teak decks would worry me a whole lot more than the engine.
Engines are generally far easier (and cheaper) to replace than teak decks, at least on most sailboats.

However, the new engine I'm putting in my powerboat right now cost more than my first house in Newport.
 

kinardly

Super Anarchist
I think Bob Perry had some very blunt criticism of the Formosa yard. That would be enough to discourage me from considering one of their used boats, even if it were in fantastic shape. This one is clearly not.
 

Hukilau

Member
417
188
Branford, CT
I'm a big fan of the looks of the Alberg 35, even if I've never been a fan of how they sail. I thought the electric conversion of this one made it interesting enough for here:


1672154942332.png
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
70,136
13,298
Great Wet North
Alberg's design was a good looking boat but that's about all that can be said for it.

Note I say design in the singular because he only designed one boat - and offered it in a variety of sizes.

I sailed a 30 that a friend of my father owned - probably the worst boat I ever sailed with the possible exception of my Vivacity 20.

Slow, but it did have the strongest weather helm I've ever experienced.

In case I was too subtle, I'm not a fan of the design.
 

Hukilau

Member
417
188
Branford, CT
About 15 years ago, an acquaintance was selling her Alberg 35. The boat was Bristol: he's a finish carpenter, and she's persnickity. The brightwork was varnished to perfection, and they had made a few custom additions to the interior that were quite useful and tastefully done. The boat had been repowered with a diesel not too long before, and was in top shape. Sails weren't new, but still had plenty of life left. In short, if one were prone to purchase an Alberg 35, you weren't going to get a much better specimen. They gave me the subtle soft sell a couple of times, but I wasn't biting. I had sailed on another friend's Alberg 35 a few years before; the winds were blowing about 15 knots, and we were pretty much burying the rail. Not to mention I thought the weather helm might break my arms. This was definitely not the boat for my (at the time) young family and non-sailing wife.

Still, ol' Carl drew very pretty boats indeed.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,287
2,924
Speaking of great designers and old fiberglass boats, you have to be careful with Pearson love.

A bad recipe: Take a classic design that was well enough built by Pearson, and take it to Hinckley for the carte blanche restoration.

The result is a bill for over a million for your beautiful classic glass boat that is hard to sell for more than 200K.


 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,546
2,549
Speaking of great designers and old fiberglass boats, you have to be careful with Pearson love.

A bad recipe: Take a classic design that was well enough built by Pearson, and take it to Hinckley for the carte blanche restoration.

The result is a bill for over a million for your beautiful classic glass boat that is hard to sell for more than 200K.



You can buy what was virtually the last Bermuda 40 built for substantially less money than they are asking for the "Hinckleyfied" Pearson 41.

I know which one I'd rather have.

Hinckley does beautiful work, and they bailed me out big time a couple of years ago when I had a fuel system issue.
.
But I also had a friend who took his big Farr there 20+ years ago to have a hydraulic stern platform installed. Even back then, it cost him more than $300k for that job.
 

slap

Super Anarchist
6,135
1,609
Somewhat near Naptown
Speaking of great designers and old fiberglass boats, you have to be careful with Pearson love.

A bad recipe: Take a classic design that was well enough built by Pearson, and take it to Hinckley for the carte blanche restoration.

The result is a bill for over a million for your beautiful classic glass boat that is hard to sell for more than 200K.




And here is a Pearson Rhodes 41 yawl in fairly good shape for $62,900 -

https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/1963-pearson-rhodes-41-7505375/
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,287
2,924
You can buy what was virtually the last Bermuda 40 built for substantially less money than they are asking for the "Hinckleyfied" Pearson 41.

I know which one I'd rather have.

Hinckley does beautiful work, and they bailed me out big time a couple of years ago when I had a fuel system issue.
.
But I also had a friend who took his big Farr there 20+ years ago to have a hydraulic stern platform installed. Even back then, it cost him more than $300k for that job.

You'll like this one better. Hinckley 41 restoration.

But this vid brings to mind the debate; Do you want to sail or are you primarily a project person drawn to boats?

I don't get the feeling this owner was much into sailing.

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,287
2,924
It took me a while to understand it is okay to be drawn to nice objects without actually wanting to operate them.
For instance, rare watches or chariots with scythes on the wheels.

I agree. Like the sports car he restored (does he drive it?), the restoration was the goal, not sailing.

That's why I love these finished-for-sale videos. The project is all done, and so is the owner-doer.

I hope to see it sailing. Seems like a good deal although, I found some things curiously un-done, and under-equipped, which surprised me.

Maybe the best deal is in the future; after a sailor buys it and uses it for several years, and then sells it.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,546
2,549
You'll like this one better. Hinckley 41 restoration.

But this vid brings to mind the debate; Do you want to sail or are you primarily a project person drawn to boats?

I don't get the feeling this owner was much into sailing.


The problem with the Hinckley 41 is that it is essentially an Owens cutter, and is very small inside for her length--more similar to the Pearson Rhodes 41 than the Bermuda 40.

This one is very nice, but I'd pass. If you want a 40' Hinckley, you really can't beat a Bermuda 40, the newer the better. The Mark III versions with the sit-down nav station and dinette are my favorites.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,287
2,924
The problem with the Hinckley 41 is that it is essentially an Owens cutter, and is very small inside for her length--more similar to the Pearson Rhodes 41 than the Bermuda 40.

This one is very nice, but I'd pass. If you want a 40' Hinckley, you really can't beat a Bermuda 40, the newer the better. The Mark III versions with the sit-down nav station and dinette are my favorites.

We did notice how narrow/small below it was. If you could live with that, wouldn't it be a stronger sailor than a B40, especially to windward?

A plus (I think) in those first glass Hinckleys like this or the Pilot (older than the B40) is that they are all solid glass. They didn't use any coring, anywhere.

I deal with a hands-on boatyard owner that raves about the P-35 after restoring one for a customer. He especially loves that so many fittings are tapped into the solid glass.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,546
2,549
We did notice how narrow/small below it was. If you could live with that, wouldn't it be a stronger sailor than a B40, especially to windward?

A plus (I think) in those first glass Hinckleys like this or the Pilot (older than the B40) is that they are all solid glass. They didn't use any coring, anywhere.

I deal with a hands-on boatyard owner that raves about the P-35 after restoring one for a customer. He especially loves that so many fittings are tapped into the solid glass.
If I were by myself, I might well have a Pilot, If I couldn't afford a Morris 36. There are few sweeter-looking boats, but they are small.
 




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