Craigslist - Not mocking

paps49

Super Anarchist
8,909
295
Adelaide Australia
I think so too, someone asked me for more info and I contacted the seller with no reply.

The only thing that made me skittish about it is that according to the current owners is that it was sheathed with Dynel/epoxy in the early 90s.  When asked for details the seller said the bilge was still bare wood, and that they always kept it wet, then went on to note that it naturally stayed wet anyways, but no inspection had been done since then other than some small repairs.  They also said they had a big roll of the Dynel on board for repairs.  When I asked if they would be comfortable with a potential buyer having a couple fasteners pulled to check(and the grind off/re glassing and filling/fairing/paint at buyers expense (really not hard on a 4" patch max) they said there was no way they would consider any sampling of the hull/fasteners.  37 year after sheathing, I would like to see what condition the underlying wood/fasteners were in before buying.  Then I found out the boat was in Mexico, not Canada where it was posted.

The links you posted note a boat with two cabins, and two heads.  The one for sale was a single head where the V-berth would be, one quarter berth, and a convertible dinette.  I wonder if it was later converted or if there is more than one out there?
Yeah, interesting.

It was modified by the previous owner, he put a workshop in the aft cabin but left the bunks underneath.

 

jgbrown

Anarchist
584
35
Vancouver
maybe he's thinking of the 20,000 brass screws they brag about in the construction?
Correct.  If the bilges were dry, and kept dry I would not think anything of it. But that was the first time an owner of a cold moulded boat told me that they kept the wood wet, and that it keeps itself wet because otherwise it would move and dry out and leak more.  The couple of them that I have met were fanatical about dry bilges.  But salt water saturation and glass on one side for 30 years... I would like to see the condition of them, specifically the condition of the wood layer closest to the dynel.  More modern cold molding with epoxy in between has some advantages that way and I might suspect that even if the innermost surface was saturated, the rest might still be OK).  I wanted to see a few of those fasteners, and to see how well the dynel was still bonded to the wood.  Rot in a boat with that style of construction would be unpleasant to fix to put it mildly, and corrosion of brass in wood that was saturated with trapped salt water might be exciting    They did say that several fasteners were pulled during the sheathing and inspected so they must be accessible with the Dynel off.  Sounds like they're totally ok according to the sellers, but a day of checking and repairing the checked areas plus the cost of haul out is money well spent. 

 

paps49

Super Anarchist
8,909
295
Adelaide Australia
maybe he's thinking of the 20,000 brass screws they brag about in the construction?
True but none in the outside layer, nailed and then the nails removed. Anyway it's nice to dream, I just hope whoever bought it knows what a special boat she is. The Canadian couples heart was in the right place but were novices I suspect.




 

jgbrown

Anarchist
584
35
Vancouver
True but none in the outside layer, nailed and then the nails removed. Anyway it's nice to dream, I just hope whoever bought it knows what a special boat she is. The Canadian couples heart was in the right place but were novices I suspect
Interesting, from the description they sent me when I asked, it really sounded like a traditionally fastened hull sheathed in Dynel.  They specifically referenced fasteners were removed and checked before the sheathing, and specifically mentioned keeping the bilges wet(and pickling them) so that the wood didn't dry out and move.  Which all makes it sound much more like a sheathed wood boat than something built originally as described in the magazine article you posted, I think they would have had a lot more interest with that article.    I wonder if that was part of the challenge in selling it, if I wasn't the only one who took their explanation that way.   They did mention several thousand miles and a long time cruising but that they were returning to work. 

 

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
19,045
4,456
Poland
Interesting, from the description they sent me when I asked, it really sounded like a traditionally fastened hull sheathed in Dynel.  They specifically referenced fasteners were removed and checked before the sheathing, and specifically mentioned keeping the bilges wet(and pickling them) so that the wood didn't dry out and move.  Which all makes it sound much more like a sheathed wood boat than something built originally as described in the magazine article you posted, I think they would have had a lot more interest with that article.    I wonder if that was part of the challenge in selling it, if I wasn't the only one who took their explanation that way.   They did mention several thousand miles and a long time cruising but that they were returning to work. 
What?  Sailors that ran out of money?  Inconceivable!

 

paps49

Super Anarchist
8,909
295
Adelaide Australia
Interesting, from the description they sent me when I asked, it really sounded like a traditionally fastened hull sheathed in Dynel.  They specifically referenced fasteners were removed and checked before the sheathing, and specifically mentioned keeping the bilges wet(and pickling them) so that the wood didn't dry out and move.  Which all makes it sound much more like a sheathed wood boat than something built originally as described in the magazine article you posted, I think they would have had a lot more interest with that article.    I wonder if that was part of the challenge in selling it, if I wasn't the only one who took their explanation that way.   They did mention several thousand miles and a long time cruising but that they were returning to work. 
Five years from now I would have bought it in a heartbeat, oh well....

Yes they bought it in WA and then sailed south to Mexico briefly before returning to San Diego. I think the trip back home was a bit daunting for them. Funny thing is they referred to the magazine article and said there was a copy of the magazine onboard sealed in plastic! Maybe they never bothered to unwrap and read it!

 
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paps49

Super Anarchist
8,909
295
Adelaide Australia
This is beautiful but why plow that much money into a old IOR boat??? Listed at 34' but looks more like a 2 tonner to me.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/yacht/273045843096?hash=item3f92ccec98:g:A5wAAOSw~T9abtpB

1 tonner.jpg

 

Sail4beer

Super Anarchist
9,517
3,092
Toms River,NJ
That AMF would do well as a beer can killer. Rates well and fun to sail. A local Olympic sailor bought one from our esteemed rule beater before I knew about it...

 

Pertinacious Tom

Super Anarchist
60,961
1,625
Punta Gorda FL
The AMF 21 that was in my driveway for a while (and got nominated for Admiration by the Society) is now being actively raced by some of the kids from the sailing center. So it's more Admirable than it was, but still ugly.

 

Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
40,087
7,612
Eastern NC
The AMF 21 that was in my driveway for a while (and got nominated for Admiration by the Society) is now being actively raced by some of the kids from the sailing center. So it's more Admirable than it was, but still ugly.
It's a Ted Hood design..... or at least, from his office........ it is kind of an ugly duckling, however much one likes flush decks (and I love flush decks). I've never sailed one myself but I've sailed in company with them a couple of times, they do OK. The lifting keel takes up far too much room below, but that's a worth while sacrifice IMHO.

Somebody in the area is sitting around wishing they could afford a nice sailboat. I hope they find this one.

FB- Doug

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
65,119
10,608
Great Wet North
Always reminded me of a mini Pearson Flyer - I like them and don't think they are ugly.

They do need a contrasting stripe through those hull ports though.

 
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