Cruising a Beneteau 40.7

Kiwi Clipper

Member
86
57
The trouble is, literally thousands of good boats are left with structural uncertainty because it seems like no one has organized an economic evaluation and fix. Some surveyor needs to develop a detailed expertise regarding the issues and their potential fixes, together with the measurement instruments required. Does anyone know anyone who is doing that?
 

Ericson

New member
13
2
Virginia
My close friend bought a Bene 38.1 about 7 mos ago (new). He gets water in the bilge when sailing. About 1/2 a quart in two hours. Can't find the leak yet (he or the dealer). Very little water if just setting in slip.
 

Ericson

New member
13
2
Virginia
He cut the top off a plastic 1 qt oil container and uses it as his bilge scoop.

I thought rudder packing glands, prop shaft packing, water tank (and lines and outlets), Yanmar leak, Sail Drive leak, exhaust hose leak, chain locker leak (when washing down). He said he has eliminated those with the broker in a methodical manner. Mast is deck stepped.
 

Kiwi Clipper

Member
86
57
If this is a new boat which has not been subjected to any kind of grounding or other serious damage the problem is a PIA but probably not serious; however it should be tracked down so you know that it's not serious.
Is the water salty or fresh. Could be nothing more than rain water getting into anchor locker or elsewhere then moving when the boat heels. Water could also get in there from splash when sailing. Could be a rail leak.
Sponge the boat dry then see where the dribbles are coming from.
Maybe the keel bolts were not tightened enough, or inadequately caulked when putting the keel on the boat. If it's the keel bolts, he can clear the area around the keel bolts and then try to tighten them. There is a long handled wrench that bends and gives you a reading of how much tightening torque you are using. There are standards for how much torque is too much. If it's a keel bolt leak you might have to haul the boat and reset the keel.
 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,687
1,098
My close friend bought a Bene 38.1 about 7 mos ago (new). He gets water in the bilge when sailing. About 1/2 a quart in two hours. Can't find the leak yet (he or the dealer). Very little water if just setting in slip.
Personally, I would look at the hull rudder shaft seal. If it is slightly worn or damaged, it can slow/small seep just exactly like that. Hard to see unless you are specifically looking for it.
 

Upp3

Anarchist
718
260
He cut the top off a plastic 1 qt oil container and uses it as his bilge scoop.

I thought rudder packing glands, prop shaft packing, water tank (and lines and outlets), Yanmar leak, Sail Drive leak, exhaust hose leak, chain locker leak (when washing down). He said he has eliminated those with the broker in a methodical manner. Mast is deck stepped.
If it is one of the bolded ones then it certainly isn't the other.
 

Panoramix

Super Anarchist
Some would argue you're not a cruising sailor if you've never touched bottom. Not applicable to Wednesday night club racers...

Depends where you sail...

27a6fd8d8e6099cfb326e8ad7320d4fe.png


In some places you really don't want to take risks....
 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,798
863
Nova Scotia
Can your boat survive a grounding in these conditions ?

Touching wood but I've only grounded on sand or mud in sheltered areas where I was taking risks. If you do it in an exposed place, you lose most boats.
Of course not - any prudent sailor knows that hard coasts mean hard ends for wrecked boats. However, there is a small cove by Sambro lighthouse (pictured) that allows access to the island on a calm, settled day. I would hope that a cruising boat can take a bump from the bottom in that cove that would not result in a compromised structure. Can a modern, grid-hung keel even dry out alongside without damage to grid or hull? Probably not. My point was that the criteria I would use for a cruising boat is probably not met by many modern design 'Wednesday night club racers". Touching bottom will happen sooner or later if you are cruising IMO.
 

andykane

Member
473
228
Victoria, BC
Can a modern, grid-hung keel even dry out alongside without damage to grid or hull? Probably not.
Jeanneau seem to think otherwise - from their current brochure

sunodyssey.png

When beaching, please take into account the sea and wind conditions, as well as, the type and angle of the seabed. If the boat is to be left unattended, beaching legs are recommended. It is the responsibility of the user to beach the boat in a safe and secure manner
 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,841
2,799
Pacific Rim
Depends where you sail...

27a6fd8d8e6099cfb326e8ad7320d4fe.png


In some places you really don't want to take risks....
Looks like a place to never take one of these popular Bump ‘n Sink boats. There is a difference between banging a hard bottom in otherwise navigable water and running a boat hard aground on those rocks. I have hit coral heads at moderate speeds … somewhat more than once. Once got stopped dead from sailing speed by a part of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, too. One marina slip’s mud lifted the boat at low tide every day … ULDBs … not Beneteau-like things … no damage a few tablespoons of bog couldn’t fix.
 

Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
1,798
863
Nova Scotia
Boats are designed to be able to sit on their keels when hauled out, with stands keeping them upright. Why would this be significantly more different?
Perhaps its no different. But would you lean a Bene 40.7 up against the harbour wall and let her dry out on a ten-foot tide? I have no idea if this is possible, unlike the Jenneau pictured above, drying out on the beach. I come from a different generation of sailors and boats. All my boats have been able to dry out and stand on their keels (and often did).
 

Panoramix

Super Anarchist
Of course not - any prudent sailor knows that hard coasts mean hard ends for wrecked boats. However, there is a small cove by Sambro lighthouse (pictured) that allows access to the island on a calm, settled day. I would hope that a cruising boat can take a bump from the bottom in that cove that would not result in a compromised structure. Can a modern, grid-hung keel even dry out alongside without damage to grid or hull? Probably not. My point was that the criteria I would use for a cruising boat is probably not met by many modern design 'Wednesday night club racers". Touching bottom will happen sooner or later if you are cruising IMO.
I am sure that lot of 40.7 have touched the bottom at 2 knots without major damage while entering a narrow cove. Drying it along a quay ? I would not try because IMO the chord of the keel is too narrow and you would end up relying on lines or halyards to keep the boat longitudinally upright.
 

kinardly

Super Anarchist
While that tide is running out with your boat securely anchored or tied off to a quay or breakwater, it’s going to rise and fall with each wave that washes in. There is going to be a period during your beaching/drying exercise when the boat will be slamming hard on its keel and no dagger keel-pan grid hull is going to survive that. It’s not what those kind of boats is for. Take your time, conduct a thorough sounding survey by dinghy, consult your charts and tide tables, avoid the anchorage in the first place or- get a boat designed for that kind of abuse.
 


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