DC Designs

ICU2

Member
324
18
Australia
Mean while in a shed in rural Australia another IC is being built 90% complete the fun task of paint prep and paint left to do. Only 2 weeks until the OZ nationals no time to waste....

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Willy Clark

Member
188
63
Boston, MA
Is it coming to play at the next worlds?
That's the plan.

Much of the class conversation has moved to FB/Google Groups, but thought I'd post this here as well:

2020 US East Coast Championships
July 11-12, 2020
North Shore Yacht Club, Port Washington, NY
Race Area: Manhasset Bay

North Shore Yacht Club, which is what eventually grew out of the New York Canoe Club in the 1800s, is celebrating its 150th anniversary (or something) in 2020. As such they are looking to re-connect with their roots and thus have invited the IC class to their club for a regatta on Manhasset Bay, one of the earliest homes of canoe sailing in the United States.

All competitors will be housed by club members. Meals (at least some) will be provided. Race committee, safety boats, and spectator boats also provided by the club. Loaner boats will be available. Also likely to award the Steve Lysak "Hangover Cup" at the event, as it seems like an appropriate opportunity to pay homage to our much-loved fallen comrade.

Contact me if you plan to attend so we can sort out your housing. Looks like a good one. Further details to follow.

Also planning to organize a clinic/mess about day on the day before, Friday the 10th.

Contact me if interested.

Mike's boat progresses, as does Dad's Crazy Ivan. There is also a strip planked boat being built further south. Chris has designed a Maas 5 that Geoff is building down under. There are also plans to build at least 2 new Maas hulls prior to the upcoming Worlds. And Hayden has finished his boat and it looks great.

Good stuff for the class heading into this season.
 

Dave Clark

Anarchist
898
839
Rhode Island
I keep trying to post pictures of Mike Costello's new boat, but some sort of new feature designed to block the posting of hardcore pornography keeps blocking the posts...

DRC

 

Willy Clark

Member
188
63
Boston, MA
Fresh content: 

We also spent a lot of time this weekend discussing the merits/pitfalls of larger vs. smaller dagger boards. Much of the conversation revolves around the ability to "go slow fast." That is, when one is lit up like below, the standard Clark dagger boards likely offer far too much side force and results in one consistently having to dump leech to keep boat flat and moving fast. This is solved by aggressively reefing the board in anything more 7-8 knots. So, why not just make a smaller board? Well, there are those critical moments where the extra amount of side force really saves you - trying to hold your lane at the start. Trying desperately to barely make the windward mark that you under stood. Trying not to stall out after a rather bad light air tack. These are the times when the large board pays for itself.

That said, the times when you find yourself going upwind in decent breeze without the board reefed enough does hurt you. It can begin to feel like the boat is being knocked over in the puffs rather than shooting forward like it should.

Consequently believe the plan is for Mike to go with a smaller board this "season" while I stick with the old model. We'll see what happens.




 

Dex Sawash

Demi Anarchrist
2,570
796
NC USA
I've got a less tall car than I had so I can rooftop my Nethercott without help now. Any experience with bow forward or stern forward? Boat is sitting on 150 pound rated kayak saddles. Will lay up a glass transverse bunk for the front (of boat) saddle as it point-loads more than I like it to.

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JimC

Not actually an anarchist.
8,171
1,064
South East England
I used to put the trolley (dolly to you? ) up first, take the wheels off then pick the bow up and push her onto the cradles, so always well supported. The aluminium trolley was a very good Christmas present to myself... 

 

Lifesave

Anarchist
854
43
Heath, Texas
I laid up bolsters on my hull and glassed in an aluminum tube as an axle. Plug in a PVC tongue and dolly wheels when you get where you're going and you are good to go. Used the same system on an Xterra.

IMG_2280.jpeg

 

Lifesave

Anarchist
854
43
Heath, Texas
Pointy end forward always. Bet that stern first arrangement cost you a couple of MPG's. Easier to tie down with the rudder fittings though. I have always trusted straps alone. I thought I knew cars but I don't know what that one is. Not a B-210. Old Datsun? Enlighten me. 

 

Willy Clark

Member
188
63
Boston, MA
Bow first IMO. Two straps should be just about all you need. If on is after of carriage to stop the boat gradually sliding aft you're fine. If you want to tie the bow down, there ought to be a way to make little loops on the front of the car and tie from there to the fitting where your forestay goes. Then tie after to your rudder trunk. But again, with racks and straps you ought to be fine.

Furthermore Dave is definitely right - if bow first is more hydrodynamic it stands to reason that it's more aerodynamic too! Therefor, bow first is the way to go!

Best,
Willy

 

Bill5

Right now
2,812
2,350
Western Canada
Pointy end forward always. Bet that stern first arrangement cost you a couple of MPG's. Easier to tie down with the rudder fittings though. I have always trusted straps alone. I thought I knew cars but I don't know what that one is. Not a B-210. Old Datsun? Enlighten me. 
1972 Datsun 1200. I was theorizing blunt end forward, fine end aft would work best. 

 




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