DC Designs

TimClark

Super Anarchist
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NYC
What I thought after the boat swap was that the boats all felt like very different animals, but seemed to be similarly quick.I recall a boat swap with Erich Chase sometime around 2001. We both felt the other's boat felt much better ( and faster) than our own and we split races throughout the series. I like the way Phil and Chris's boat slide along, but Chris will be the first to tell you that you have to be pretty careful down wind in big waves or wind with his boat. I think he wants to add some freeboard and volume forward on the next edition, but as always, does this slow him down?

It should be pointed out that Chris had done a superb job of sorting this project. Since I first raced against him in Marion, he made all the crunchy bits tough enough, built a second dagger board, bought a jib cut to the same pattern as we had, and found Anders Peterson and convinced him to make a mainsail. When I learned that last bit, I was pretty dispirited. Anders' mains are really special and I hadn't managed to make the connection, so I felt out gunned.

The more pointy sterned boats don't seem to give up much ever. Phil's boat will be miles easier to sail if he cuts the freeboard down and thus lowers the crew's CG. This will make sailing the hollow log much less like balancing on one. I have spent more than a few minutes during the last week thinking of how to cross Phil's construction with Chris's general concept, as it seems that it would be easy to fold up a canoe that was "about like that."

Of course I'm not sure how many people want to take the cheap and easy way to building a boat like this. There is something to be said for the drool factor.

The Morisson and the Kells are very very nice canoes, both of which had less than 3 hours of sailing before hitting the water in McCrae, so it would be impossible to say anything about them except that they have shown great potential and cannot be dismissed. I liked the way they moved when I sailed them.

My own effort is certainly in tho mix. Oliver probably shot himself in the foot by getting wrapped up in he I-14 last summer and not getting Uncle Walter done anywhere near in time to get sorted out, so he too was doing the sort dance instead of really racing for much of the regatta. Josie is fast, I am going to narrow the waterlines forward just a tad and increase the radius at the turn of the bilge.

As Hayden says, she is really fun to drive on reaches because she seems to flirt with disaster but mostly avoid it. You CAN drive her under, as Willy will attest, But you have to work pretty hard to do it. So, just as Chris thinks String Theory is just on the too dangerous side of OK, I think Josie might be just on the too safe side of OK.

Anyway exciting times ahead, I hope many new people want to come and play with whet I think are extraordinary boats.

SHC
Thanks for another perspective on things. On the other side of things, was there anything else that you noted to make a good difference? One question is does the jib stick provide a worthy advantage? Also, were most of the boats using square top mains? If so, was the difference notable?

TC

 
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Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
Thanks for another perspective on things. On the other side of things, was there anything else that you noted to make a good difference? One question is does the jib stick provide a worthy advantage? Also, were most of the boats using square top mains? If so, was the difference notable?
TC
Plenty of square tops.

Jib stick seemed to help,

Oliver is sold on his gybing board.

Hayden proved that time in a well sorted boat trumps all.

SHC

 

Phil S

Super Anarchist
2,595
224
Sydney
Everyone seems to think my Hollow Log was wobbly. I thought so too a year ago but must have got used to it. I thought everyone else's boats were very stable.

I think I swam only a few times in the races. Once was when I pulled the fin out to clear weed and got an unsettling wave. And I remenber at least two dud tacks. There might have been one or two bad gybes.

If someone buys it I would build it lower next time, but the same shape.

 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
But most important of all, now that the worlds are over, what's the next toy that will come out of the lab of luxury?
I have to finish Dave Penfeild's A cat.

I have to replace "Dunenuf" who I killed in a fit of anger at the A Class worlds.

Then I have to replace josie.

Current thoughts are to modify the bow by narrowing the waterlines a bit and changing the turn of the bilge to be less chine like in the first meter or so of the boat and see what that does. It is pretty easy to do these changes to the Josie mold. I am also thinking about how to roll up a plywood version of String Theory. It would be interesting to try if people thought they could/would build boats that way. Otherwise the mold rules.

SHC

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
59,802
4,559
De Nile
What's the current build method of the boats? build a plug and female mold?

Are there common scantlings folks are building too? I'm contemplating a project now that my workshop is complete and a canoe would fit nicely. I've also got some foam/carbon laying around that needs to be put to good use.

Anyone publish any of the recent designs?

 

TimClark

Super Anarchist
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NYC
What's the current build method of the boats? build a plug and female mold?
Are there common scantlings folks are building too? I'm contemplating a project now that my workshop is complete and a canoe would fit nicely. I've also got some foam/carbon laying around that needs to be put to good use.

Anyone publish any of the recent designs?
There have been a couple different methods. It seems that most are building a plug and female mold and building off of that. However, there are exceptions to that like Wonk and PhilS' canoe that are out of ply. They are a little different in construction as Wonk is ply and a layer of carbon cloth where IIRC, PhilS' is ply with carbon on the seams and the high load places.

TC

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
59,802
4,559
De Nile
Perfect, thanks,

With regards to the issue of a stayed rig, does the canoe class allow carbon tubes(as deck spreaders) or is there a hull continuity requirement?

 

TimClark

Super Anarchist
1,441
0
NYC
Perfect, thanks,
With regards to the issue of a stayed rig, does the canoe class allow carbon tubes(as deck spreaders) or is there a hull continuity requirement?
No deck spreaders allowed. If you check out String Theory, you will notice that the hull has carbon tubes, but the hull shape accommodates the tubes.

TC

 

Phil S

Super Anarchist
2,595
224
Sydney
The hull rule has plan form shape requirements limiting curvature and allowing only one inflection each side. It is intended the hulls look like canoes not porcupines. There is no rule about rigging so big spreaders low on the mast are OK.

 

gui

Anarchist
What's the current build method of the boats? build a plug and female mold?
Are there common scantlings folks are building too? I'm contemplating a project now that my workshop is complete and a canoe would fit nicely. I've also got some foam/carbon laying around that needs to be put to good use.

Anyone publish any of the recent designs?
Join the fun Mitch ... I miss kicking your ass (or was it the other way around?)

3 things about the canoe guys:

1-They don't how to properly use a heat gun

2- " make hulls out of cotton

3-They've kissed their sisi at least once :blink:

 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
The scantlings of the new boats is pretty much a layer or 200 g/m^2 ( or 5.7 oz) carbon cloth on either side of some 6mm (1/4") foam core. H80 density or equivalent.

There are patches and doublers in high load areas, but 50 yards or so builds the boat and bits with a very little left over.

The plywood boats are built out of 3mm ply with some ammount of carbon or kevlar on either the inside or outside. There are more bulkheads or ribs needed to stiffen the plywood boat so you can build over a series of frames or stuff foam bulkheads in as per Phil's method/

The rules are here:http://www.intcanoe.org/forum2/viewtopic.php?t=687

And there are a lots of pictures of the various processes at http://www.intcanoe.us/component/option,co...mid,84/catid,2/

I am still in Oz, but have been doing some doodling on Log Theory. I would have to build at least one model to see how things behaved, so give me a chance to get home and try some things out.

SHC

 

Phil S

Super Anarchist
2,595
224
Sydney
Steve, and other ply boat potentials,

The foam and ply bulkheads do not get stuufed in, they are not intended to change the shape but retain it. They are fitted to the hull shape as determined by the ply cut out shape, by how it is spread and stressed prior to doing the seams, and how it is pulled back to design beam after seaming. Pushing in poorly fitting bulheads only makes bumps.

Phil S

 

Steve Clark

Super Anarchist
Steve, and other ply boat potentials,The foam and ply bulkheads do not get stuufed in, they are not intended to change the shape but retain it. They are fitted to the hull shape as determined by the ply cut out shape, by how it is spread and stressed prior to doing the seams, and how it is pulled back to design beam after seaming. Pushing in poorly fitting bulheads only makes bumps.

Phil S
Sorry for the verb, I didn't mean what you interpreted. I always "stuff" things inside hulls as a self depricating way of describing my ability to cut and fit things.

SHC

 

nzintcanoe

Member
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0
Started my DC build - just jig at the mo. but taking shape! Based very loosely (down to min beam) on Lust Puppet offsets provided by Steve; Cheers by the way! Took a bit of rocker out

Aiming to stitch/glue/carbon 3mm gaboon ply reminisant of Phils holllow log. Hopefully keep it down to weight

As it is my first build I'm trying to keep it simple - nice hard chines should keep her pretty stable.

jig1.jpg

Any advice much appreciated.

AP

 
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