Delaming wood bulkheads

Bowchow

Anarchist
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13
Not sure what my options are here.. Thin laminate to re cover the bulkheads?  Any ideas? Water leak has been fixed 

1040619734_IMG_2435copy.jpg

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,509
665
Boston, MA
I had a similar situation in the aft cabin and ended up tearing out all the wood and replacing it. In the main saloon we were able to cut out the damaged wood, lay in a new piece, and stain to match. you've got some disassembly to do, unfortunately, if you want it to really look good.

 

MiddayGun

Super Anarchist
1,179
442
Yorkshire
In an ideal world, you'd replace it. That top veneer looks to have delaminated across a much larger area than the photo shows.
Even if you just re-veneered then you'd be gluing onto a suspect substrate.

 
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PaulK

Super Anarchist
Seems like the companionway is leaking at the corner, allowing water into the plywood and causing the top layer to delaminate first.  The substrate plywood is also suspect because of this, and may also need to be replaced.  If the leak isn't also fixed, your repair will need re-doing shortly. Sorry.

It might be easiest to cut out all the plywood (and veneer) and replace it with new plywood with a veneered face.  Cutting and gluing veneer to fit on a bulkhead and having it lie flat and join properly with the existing veneer is tricky. 

 
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Bowchow

Anarchist
615
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Is that a bulkhead (implying structural) or just a decorative piece of the companionway?
After I posted this that got me thinking.. 

To be honest I'm not sure. She's a 1981 and a decent designer so I would hope and assume that there is a glass bulkhead and this is just decorative.. 

Especially if I need to replace it 

 

steele

Super Anarchist
1,729
229
Land of the locks
It looks to be a lot of work to disassemble that part of the boat to get to the damaged area. The curved frame around the hatch and the handholds may even be glued in addition to the bungs and screws. Removing just the veneer and damaged top layer of plywood would be do-able, but as mentioned the underlying wood would be suspect and uneven. 

As long as it seems structuraly sound and the leak fixed I would use a cardboard template to cut a piece of 1/8 or even 1/16 plywood to cover the damaged area. If you ran it under the frame to other side and made it symetrical it would look better. It would stand proud of the surrounding bulkhead but if he edges were eased and stained to match it would look good enough.

I suspect the damaged area is not structural, the area in question looks to end at cockpit floor level and is not a full bulkhead, and the area is reinforced by companionway hatch frame. Do not take my word for it, further investigation is needed. A few more photos and noting the type of boat would help.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,666
12,346
Great Wet North
More pics needed to be sure but it looks to me like a huge amount of work to replace.

From that one pic my inclination would be to fill, fair and paint.

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,509
665
Boston, MA
After I posted this that got me thinking.. 

To be honest I'm not sure. She's a 1981 and a decent designer so I would hope and assume that there is a glass bulkhead and this is just decorative.. 

Especially if I need to replace it 
I would be very surprised if it weren't glass behind the veneer. Look at it this way, there is some work involved here, but every good job starts with good prep. On my Freedom, I have yet to find decorative trim that was glued to the fiberglass. I'm in the middle of a revamp of my v-berth. It looked like this:

before.jpg

Notice that it looks like long slats screwed into the hull. Turns out, the long slats are glued to a luan backer and yes it's screwed in, but it came out as a sheet, not as individual pieces. It wasn't glued in at all, not even around the porthole cutouts. So now it looks like this:

After.jpg

To get there, I had to disassemble a lot of trim. When I did the overheads in the main saloon, I had to bust out the bungs on the handrails, but even they were only lag-screwed in.

I'll bet almost nothing is glued down on that face. You could start by taking out those three bolts and seeing what you can see, but while this looks like a big job, it's not terrible, and I am not sure I'd want to just fill fair and paint. For one thing, you'd at least know if you really got the leak fixed.

 

PaulK

Super Anarchist
We were lucky on our J/36 when leaking chainplates made the veneer lift on the main bulkhead, and the bulkhead itself was solid fiberglass. That meant only the veneer needed replacing, and we stopped the leaks by recaulking the chainplates on deck.  This repair looks like there is plywood underneath that will also need replacing, and that will not be as easy a fix.

 




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