DH spin retrieval

Anybody have any suggestions for designing/configuring a double handed spinn retrieval system? 33' asymetric boat, frac rig but MH kites. There are lots of options but anything applicable purely to a DH situation that I'm not thinking about?

 

Guitar

Super Anarchist
spring loaded drum somewhere or you could add a DC motor to the drum and use cordless technology to spin it. My boat (22 footer) had a close-line reel to retrieve the spin halyard when dousing.

 

pogen

Super Anarchist
5,092
8
SF Bay
Good topic.

If people have good ideas or tricks for DH spin retrieval on mid-size symmetric kite boats, I'd like to hear about them!

 

HamishMacdonald

Super Anarchist
2,675
0
That remote trigger spinlock fid on the tack/guy tylaska, then drop it down the back of the main and through the main hatch?

 

daffy

Super Anarchist
2,052
2
NW
spring loaded drum somewhere or you could add a DC motor to the drum and use cordless technology to spin it. My boat (22 footer) had a close-line reel to retrieve the spin halyard when dousing.
how long of a take up on that close-line reel? what size line?

spring loaded drum somewhere or you could add a DC motor to the drum and use cordless technology to spin it. My boat (22 footer) had a close-line reel to retrieve the spin halyard when dousing.
how long of a take up on that close-line reel? what size line?

 

Schnick

Super Anarchist
2,645
75
Vancouver, BC
Doublehanded I don't find the procedures change much from fully crewed. On the Express 37 if we are hard reaching DH we will spike the guy and drop the kite down the companionway, if we are going downwind properly I go to the front of the boat and stuff the kite down the forehatch while the other guy drops the halyard from back near the wheel.

Singlehanded is another matter entirely - my personal preference is to do all my spinnaker maneuvers out of the companion hatch when SH, just like a J24. I leave the corners connected whenever possible, stand on the kite halyard when I need it to stop running, and hope the waves are small enough that the boat will hold a course for a few seconds while I stuff the thing down the hole under the boom. Then I can set back out of the hatch with a bit of planning.

 

BalticBandit

Super Anarchist
11,114
36
Doublehanded I don't find the procedures change much from fully crewed. On the Express 37 if we are hard reaching DH we will spike the guy and drop the kite down the companionway, if we are going downwind properly I go to the front of the boat and stuff the kite down the forehatch while the other guy drops the halyard from back near the wheel.

Singlehanded is another matter entirely - my personal preference is to do all my spinnaker maneuvers out of the companion hatch when SH, just like a J24. I leave the corners connected whenever possible, stand on the kite halyard when I need it to stop running, and hope the waves are small enough that the boat will hold a course for a few seconds while I stuff the thing down the hole under the boom. Then I can set back out of the hatch with a bit of planning.
Agree with Schnick. DH the kite gets handled just like it always would the only diff is that the halyard and sheets need to be lead so that the helm can handle the running of them. Consider if you were fully crewed, you would have at most one extra hand helping to stuff the kite down the hatch and one hand on the strings, but otherwise your crew is busy doing other stuff (like trimming the jib and the main or hiking hard as you drive up to close hauled).

obviously you have to douse a bit sooner. And if you are shy reaching in a bit too much breeze, you need to turn down to unload the kite behind the jib and main, but otherwise - it should be done normally. Frankly this is a very good case where you do a weather takedown because of the safety factor you get.

 

markvannote

Member
376
25
Newport, RI
One thing you may want to add is having your spin halyard run through a ring which is at the end of a shock cord system which sucks the halyard into the mast at the hounds. As you hoist it keeps the spinnaker tight into the rig until it reaches the hounds and then the shock cord stretches as you go to the masthead. During the douse it keeps that head into the rig, behind the main and all that. I am sure people have done it forever but my first hand experience was in the Melges 32.

Sorry this is not a direct response to your question but something to think about.

Thanks.

Mark

 
I sock them all. With a sock, I am guaranteed not to shrimp the kite. But that required me to make peace with the loss of speed associated with using a sock. The sock/collar combo is not light or wind-friendly. So I deal with increased pitching and drag.

 

duncan

Super Anarchist
1,686
0
Brooklyn
we flake the halyard, open the clutch and put it on a cam cleat. unfurl the jib. i go fwd and grab the sheet...1-2-3 and blow everything while helm drives down. suck it up and jam it down the hatch, helm opens tackline.

 

Raz'r

Super Anarchist
62,334
5,516
De Nile
Doublehanded I don't find the procedures change much from fully crewed. On the Express 37 if we are hard reaching DH we will spike the guy and drop the kite down the companionway, if we are going downwind properly I go to the front of the boat and stuff the kite down the forehatch while the other guy drops the halyard from back near the wheel.

Singlehanded is another matter entirely - my personal preference is to do all my spinnaker maneuvers out of the companion hatch when SH, just like a J24. I leave the corners connected whenever possible, stand on the kite halyard when I need it to stop running, and hope the waves are small enough that the boat will hold a course for a few seconds while I stuff the thing down the hole under the boom. Then I can set back out of the hatch with a bit of planning.
+1

 

treef

Member
138
0
Single- or double-handed, letter-box drop if you have a loose-footed main.

Take the lazy sheet, run it over the boom through the gap between the main and the boom. (Make sure the outhaul is not too tight.) Turn the boat down a bit if you are tight reaching. Blow the tack line, pull the lazy sheet until you have the clew, release the halyard as you gather the kite through the companionway. At some point you have to release the active sheet as well.

After a number of shrimping excursions, I just let the tack line run free and re-rig it after the douse. I would rather spend 60 seconds rerunning the tack line than risk shrimping. (However, this is with a tack line that is external to my sprit so it is easy to re-run.)

If you need to slow down the drop (i.e. the kite lays on top of the water too fast), flake the halyard and then drop it off the back of the boat. The resistance of the halyard dragging in the water will slow it down nicely.

I tried the Tylaska remote-trigger shackle and it was finicky. I am sure there are guys better than me that can make it work.

The local doublehanded gurus mostly use socks, but them complain that they get twisted until they need a remedy with a knife, and sometimes cause more trouble than they are worth. I like the simplicity of the letter-box. Lots of spaghetti to clean up afterward, but it is reliable.

Good luck.

 

Foolish

Super Anarchist
1,712
389
Victoria, BC
Single or doublehanded:

Take guy (or tack line) in your windward hand, but leave wrapped on winch.

Take sheet in your leeward hand under the boom.

Release guy and let run.

Grab as much of the foot as you can, but don't worry about it. Even a little bit is fine.

Pop the halyard and let it run.

Pull the chute under the boom into the cockpit. You will have lots of time if you go quickly. The sail won't touch the water

In high winds if you are pointing high, the chute will swing back behind the main. No problem, just pull it in behind the main instead of under.

I've done this many hundreds of times.

Socks are WAAAAAY to slow. With the method above, you can douse at the very last second, just like crewed boat. There is no reason for you to be any slower.

 

WunHungLo

Super Anarchist
5,896
4
PNW
.......snip...............

I tried the Tylaska remote-trigger shackle and it was finicky. I am sure there are guys better than me that can make it work.

.....snip.......

Good luck.
If you're going to use a Tylaska and trip it, one neat approach for dousing short handed is to put a loop of line through the trigger opening and tie it off on the tackline block's shackle. Make the loop longer than the height you'd ordinarily raise the tack to when sailing deep. When you want to trip, just ease the tackline and as the trip line takes up the load, it'll pull down on the trigger and trip. Job done and no spikes needed..

 

Delta Blues

Super Anarchist
6,212
0
Depending on the wind speed, put all wraps around the winch of the halyard to hold it up. Throw the rest of the halyard overboard to trail alongside. Grab the recover line, and start removing one wrap at a time of the wraps around the halyard winch. You will find a balance where you can pull the spinnaker down where it doesn't fall down, or where it doesn't hang in the up position. I've done this on a 45-footer mast-head double-handing in 35 knots of wind (with the driver keeping the spinnaker blocked by the main sailing dead down wind. The spinnaker recovery was easy!

 

Infidel

Super Anarchist
Wireless autopilot on a necklace and helm is covered. Most DH SIs allow this and should.

Letterbox! Especially with asymms and the hotter angles.

Find a partner with long arms.

I like the halyard wraps on the winch idea. Nice.

Under IRC?You can pick your smaller most versatile kite and rate yourself separate from your full crewed configuration.

 




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