DH spin retrieval

puddin

Anarchist
884
0
Bump.

We have been practicing our spin handling, dousing with the jib raised and in lighter air just dousing with no jib up. If we are going to run deep before blowing the guy and letterboxing/companionway drop, how much does the jib help to blank out and collapse the spin, especially in bigger wind??

Usually we would raise the jib first before dousing the spin but there are times when it might not be possible.

We have already given up on the sock idea!
SOunds like you're talking blade weather. We've done both. It really depends on the driver keeping the boat deep and in control. So long as the chute's behind the main, it doesn't seem like that big a deal one way or the other. The jib will certainly help get the bow back downwind if you screw the pooch and round up hard.

 

KmLury

New member
I have a J 105 with a 110 sq meter asymm which I single hand and double hand frequently. Launch and retrieve asymm out of the forward hatch. Head almost dead downwind to take pressure off kite. To douse double hand is easy. Roll out jib. Crew to foredeck, release sheet. Crew grabs lazy sheet, I pop the tack clutch. When foot is in hatch, I pop halyard clutch and bring halyard tail back to helm where I feed it out as crew stuffs kite into hatch. One the key things in any asymm douse is to put lazy jib sheet behind the hatch. If it is a "windward" douse, the only difference is first the crew hauls on the lazy sheet to bring the kite in front of forestay and to windward. The jib will keep it from going off to leeward.

If you douse it properly, no need to run the tapes for next launch.

If I am alone, I use this technique I found on the J 105 forum. Set autopilot for nearly dead downwind course. Take tackline back around winch (no wrap, just turn) and bring forward to tie off on foredeck. Do the same with halyard. When I am ready, release sheet, pop clutches and go on foredeck. Grab lazy sheet with one hand, untie tack line with other and get foot into hatch. Then untid halyard, try to keep it under my foot so I can release slowly and stuff like crazy as chute comes down.

Never had a problem yet.

Good luck.

Check out the J105 class site forum and search for spinnaker take down. Lots of good ideas.

 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,543
681
Boston, MA
you can also use a lazy tack. blow sheet so kite depowers, open pole and tackline, yank lazy tack to bring sail back to companionway or wherever, ease halyard as necessary. hardest part is making sure the lazy tack is run properly in the first place.

 

Streetwise

Super Anarchist
1,728
76
Lake Champlain
I love the spin retrieval line setup on our Viper 640. Would it be possible to mirror that setup on a larger boat, or is there a max size for that feature to be practical?

jason

 

pogen

Super Anarchist
5,092
8
SF Bay
Well this morning I was looking at Gladstone's NorthU Trim book, he says the best it to do stretch-and-blow (pole forward, stretch sheet, blow halyard, gather) or if it is heavy, to letterbox. But he says the "traditional leeward douse" is not good (run or trip the guy, gather foot, let off halyard), although this is almost the same as a letterbox or pulling under the boom into the companionway. He presumes 4 - 6 crew throughout though.

??

 

Daimond

Super Anarchist
4,118
0
SF Bay Area
Well this morning I was looking at Gladstone's NorthU Trim book, he says the best it to do stretch-and-blow (pole forward, stretch sheet, blow halyard, gather) or if it is heavy, to letterbox. But he says the "traditional leeward douse" is not good (run or trip the guy, gather foot, let off halyard), although this is almost the same as a letterbox or pulling under the boom into the companionway. He presumes 4 - 6 crew throughout though.

??
I think he recommends stretch and blow for dousing at higher angles

 
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Delta Blues

Super Anarchist
6,212
1
I've done it on a 44-footer double-handed mast head rig in 35 knots of breeze. It was easy.

1. Keep the chute behind the main.

2. Keep the wraps around the winch drum.

3. Throw the haylard overboard (there is more drag when the chute is near the top of the mast, and less drag in the water as the sail comes down.

4. Sit under the boom, on the spinnaker halyard (post winch side of load).

5. You will need to adjust the number of wraps on the spinnaker halyard drum to get it to work right.

6. Life your butt cheeks to let some of the halyard down, then sit back down on the halyard, collect the spinnaker. Keep repeateding this collecting the spinnaker in your lap.

7. Carry the spinnaker to the hatch and drop it down.

 

KmLury

New member
Also, I would think stretch and blow would only work if you are dousing into the cabin via the companionway as with a J 80

Well this morning I was looking at Gladstone's NorthU Trim book, he says the best it to do stretch-and-blow (pole forward, stretch sheet, blow halyard, gather) or if it is heavy, to letterbox. But he says the "traditional leeward douse" is not good (run or trip the guy, gather foot, let off halyard), although this is almost the same as a letterbox or pulling under the boom into the companionway. He presumes 4 - 6 crew throughout though.

??
I think he recommends stretch and blow for dousing at higher angles


 

leonsuperfly

Anarchist
604
0
Also, I would think stretch and blow would only work if you are dousing into the cabin via the companionway as with a J 80

Well this morning I was looking at Gladstone's NorthU Trim book, he says the best it to do stretch-and-blow (pole forward, stretch sheet, blow halyard, gather) or if it is heavy, to letterbox. But he says the "traditional leeward douse" is not good (run or trip the guy, gather foot, let off halyard), although this is almost the same as a letterbox or pulling under the boom into the companionway. He presumes 4 - 6 crew throughout though.

??
I think he recommends stretch and blow for dousing at higher angles
not true it works better in the forward hatch as its closer to the centre of the kite,

i

 


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