Dieletric grease, yes or no?

Windward

Super Anarchist
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Ok,  I'm having corrosion problems with connections.  Boat is stored where it gets salt water spray regularly.  Lots of spray.

I use the red CRC spray on battery terminals about 2x per year.

All the other accessible bus bars, starter terminals and a myriad of other exposed connections have just historically been cleaned.

There are various Boeshield like products for a blanket spray, but whenever I have used in the past something has always shorted.   Coils were the last victim.

I'm thinking of cleaning all the connections and then slathering with dielectric grease.

Good idea?  Bad? 

Do you put into the snap together electrical connections as well?  I see people doing this...  Dielectric does not conduct, so into a snap fitting seems dubious.  

 

El Borracho

Verified User
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Pacific Rim
….Dielectric does not conduct, so into a snap fitting seems dubious.  
Yes, confusing. But most connectors push a bit of the metal thru the grease to make contact. So it works fine. Go lightly on the contact surfaces though. Things like terminal blocks and push connectors really benefit from dielectric coatings.  Also the cut ends of wire insulation to keep salty moisture out of the wire. 

 

El Borracho

Verified User
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Lithium is a metal so would the grease be non-conductive?
The lithium in grease is not in a metal state but as a salt or such. Many salts are conducive when wet. Sounds like a bad choice for electrical work. 
 

The real thing, dielectric grease, works well. Use it. 

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
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Outer Banks
I asked because I have a bunch and also have some food grade silicone goo. Rewiring the engine harness and want to do it as close to real pro as possible. I didn't google upfront but now I've read the real key thing about DE is the non-conduction in a multipin connection. Otherwise, almost any greasy goo on the OUTSIDE of the connection provides the waterproof aspect. 

 

phill_nz

Super Anarchist
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internet atm
i use lanolin ( spray or grease ) for that problem

not sure if its suitable for what you want to do with it

and it gets sticky on hot days and hard to move on cold ones

but as a salt / water barrier it works well ( the whole of my outboard under the cover is bathed in it )

 

sailak

Super Anarchist
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AK
I have found Corrosion Block or Superlube to be superior to plain old dielectric. They don't wash out.  Corrosion Block has been the best performer and is far easier to cleanup and apply.  Both of those products are recommended by their manufactures for electrical unlike some of the other suggestions up there but hey, its a free country.    

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
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Outer Banks
"Corrosion Block Waterproof Grease out performs lithium and most synthetic greases, and meets or exceeds requirements for NLGI Service Classification GC-LB (automotive wheel bearing and chassis lubricants) confirming to ATMD4950 performance requirements.

  • Waterproof
  • Multi grease compatible
  • Excellent thermal / oxidative stability
  • Resists bleeding / melting at high temperatures
  • Dielectric / non-conductive"
 

silent bob

Super Anarchist
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New Jersey
Gotta be a NZ sheep joke there somewhere.
81fUPhkQDjL._AC_SX679_.jpg

 

Kiwi Sex Doll!
 

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
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Fwiw, I've been using No-Ox-Id Special A for years and it's been great in wet applications.

 

Blue Crab

benthivore
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Outer Banks
Turns out I had half a jar of Superlube. Sez it's dielectric and it composed of synthetic grease and itsTeflon. 

.33 oz runs 6 at West. Ancor .33 oz is $12. I saw a fingerful for .89. Small potatoes for Canadian 1%ers. 

Or it's about 8 bucks a pound if ya take the "marine" out, much as I figured.

 




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