Dinghy build: Two-Paw 8 nesting

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
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Canada
B and B Yacht Designs Two-Paw 8.  (Would’ve loved to build the 9 instead but can’t seem to find room on deck for it nested b/c of a small deck box I built that mounts aft of the mast to hold crab trap, wet suit, etc. “outside” or “wet” stuff.)

Drawing the first curve - exciting!   (Guess you had to be there...or maybe it was the beer... :) )  

First time real dinghy build for me.  Staring at the prints and my feeble lines drawn on the plywood —and then the drawing of the boat nested, in 3D— I feel like there’s a part of you that just has to believe..,

https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/

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A guy in the Chesapeake

Super Anarchist
23,965
1,167
Virginia
Please - if you've got time, keep a build log - I've only built about 5 boats in my life, and they were all before "digital media" - wish I'd kept at least 35MM film pics and a build log beyond the materials and $$. 

 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,812
1,485
Canada
Good on ya'. Will you keep posting photos of the build? B&B are good...
Means a lot coming from a boatbuilder, Russell :). Yes, Graham at B&B is a pleasure to talk to with the occasional question I have had.  (BTW, with any luck that skin-on-frame kayak in the pic above will make it to PT this June (7048 Race).

Yup, will keep posting pics of the build for sure, but I can’t promise it’ll be super detailed. It’s a fun learning process, though and I enjoy doing “photo essays”.  (There’s someone on the web who’s done a very detailed photo account/description of his Two-Paw build, including a very custom, brilliant bracket system to easily mate the two halves - I’ll use his idea for that.)

I’ve done a fair amount of boat refit work, and as a electrician I get involved in lots of new build and reno stuff (home/commercial buildings), but have never built a boat. Very different!

 
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Steam Flyer

Super Anarchist
41,126
8,068
Eastern NC
Graham is a genius. Not entirely unappreciated but pretty severely under-appreciated.

Building a dinghy is a great exercise in mental discipline and physical skills. Plus a good practical dinghy is one of the best, most important, pieces of cruising equipment you can have

FB- Doug

 

bridhb

Super Anarchist
3,375
930
Jax, FL
This reminds me...I need to get to work on mine!  I cheated and bought the precut kit as I cannot seem to cut a straight line.

 

Roam

Member
103
47
B and B Yacht Designs Two-Paw 8.  (Would’ve loved to build the 9 instead but can’t seem to find room on deck for it nested b/c of a small deck box I built that mounts aft of the mast to hold crab trap, wet suit, etc. “outside” or “wet” stuff.)

Drawing the first curve - exciting!   (Guess you had to be there...or maybe it was the beer... :) )  

First time real dinghy build for me.  Staring at the prints and my feeble lines drawn on the plywood —and then the drawing of the boat nested, in 3D— I feel like there’s a part of you that just has to believe..,

https://bandbyachtdesigns.com/
Good luck on the build. I built a nesting 11' Spindrift a couple years ago. It's a ridiculous amount of work but it was worth it in the end.

Cutting your boat in half is always a fun day.

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Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,812
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Canada
Can you link to the two-paw build and bracket system/connective hardware? Hello to Graham from me next time you talk to him.
Hi Russell - Will do if (er, I mean, when :) ) I need to run another question by Graham!)

Re: connective hardware/system, see https://pbase.com/onceagain/connector_design  By a guy named Garry who used to post pretty frequently on another board (CSBB) years ago.  (Some months ago, I found another site, someone building another B and B design nester down in the Caribbean who showed some more details on the connectors.  I recall it was a useful site so I’ll try to find it.)

 
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Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
5,812
1,485
Canada
Graham is a genius. Not entirely unappreciated but pretty severely under-appreciated.

Building a dinghy is a great exercise in mental discipline and physical skills. Plus a good practical dinghy is one of the best, most important, pieces of cruising equipment you can have

FB- Doug
Yes - exactly why I’m building one - not b/c I need a great exercise in mental discipline and physical skills (being a parent/spouse, and home and boat owner, respectively gives me practice in those two areas :)).  But b/c it’ll be a “proper” practical dinghy that can never deflate :). (But I can see the value of a good, simple, roll up floor inflatable too.)

Having a sailing rig will, at least locally (I wouldn’t want to cart it far, needing to find storage space on board for it) be fun at anchor - many times have I sat at anchor just wanting to zip around for a little sail...

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Russell Brown

Super Anarchist
1,615
1,174
Port Townsend WA
Hi Russell - Will do if (er, I mean, when :) ) I need to run another question by Graham!)

Re: connective hardware/system, see https://pbase.com/onceagain/connector_design  By a guy named Garry who used to post pretty frequently on another board (CSBB) years ago.  (Some months ago, I found another site, someone building another B and B design nester down in the Caribbean who showed some more details on the connectors.  I recall it was a useful site so I’ll try to find it.)
I'm not super impressed with that connective hardware method. I'd rather see you use studs and wingnuts, or use bolts with knobs bonded on to the heads that thread into threaded washers (or bonded nuts) in the fwd half. My worry is multi: The alignment of the two halves will still be difficult to do in or out of the water. The hardware is not that strong in comparison to bolts and there have been lots of broken nesting dinghies. The recessing and alignment of the metal parts looks difficult to me. Isolating all of those fasteners from moisture intrusion looks challenging too.

You could use alignment clips like we do (to align the two halves) and bolts and it may be better. We have some outdated PT 11 manuals and you are welcome to one if you want to pay the postage. it would give you ideas about something at least. Gussets at the gunwales/connective bulkheads seem necessary to me. It's a failure waiting to happen without. If you squeeze the boat, the gunwales will split the topside planking at the joint.

Use multiple laminations on the gunwales so there's not a kink in the boat when you cut it apart (that's ugly) and if you do use bolts, you could do our method and have fairly sharp edges at the joint, so the boat didn't look like it had been cut in half. That's my two cents on that.

 
I'm a big fan of Graham's boats and of Graham. He not only helped me with advice in building the dinghy, but also in delivering our first boat to MA from NC. I built a nesting Spindrift 10 in 1995 for our first 2 year cruise and we rowed it everywhere as we didn't take an outboard. It was still going strong in 2006 when I finally got around to completing the sailing rig. It has been our favourite dinghy ever, but sadly got left behind with another family in favour of a big RIB and outboard when we headed off cruising a second time in 2012. 

We just used bolts with washers and wingnuts to connect the two parts. It was always a bit awkward putting it together, either on the deck or in the water, but we got pretty good at it.  On the Spindrift there were doublers on the bulkheads where the bolts went through. A tiny bit of water would leak through the holes around the bolts, but not enough to ever be an issue.

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Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
2,822
2,290
Yes - exactly why I’m building one - not b/c I need a great exercise in mental discipline and physical skills (being a parent/spouse, and home and boat owner, respectively gives me practice in those two areas :)).  But b/c it’ll be a “proper” practical dinghy that can never deflate :). (But I can see the value of a good, simple, roll up floor inflatable too.)

Having a sailing rig will, at least locally (I wouldn’t want to cart it far, needing to find storage space on board for it) be fun at anchor - many times have I sat at anchor just wanting to zip around for a little sail...

View attachment 346417
A sailing dinghy has been the best piece of kit for my family for over 20 years. I can't even fathom the hours and miles and experiences it has afforded. Jud, for the rig stowage, we long ago settled on this simple stow. The mast, boom and yard on our rig is sloppily folded a few times and then simply all rolled up into a 10' long, 3" diameter, 10 pound roll(self lashed with the sheet and halyard that roll around it).  

It stays on deck when we're aboard (why below) on a side deck lashed (one lash middle) to a stanchion. Not in the way, off the foot area and doesn't interfere with sheets. 

Leaving the boat at the mooring, I slide the 'roll' through the forward hatch. It stands on the sole until I go below. Below, I pull the roll through, stuff an end into the anchor locker and it rests on either side of the vee berth, out of the sun and weather. We just reverse this when going off for a few days. In 20 years, the limited sun damage has had little effect on the sail. 

I wish I had a dollar for every time I've rigged - unrigged this dinghy. 

Dinghy sailing 2-57pm (1 of 1).jpg

This is the only boat my wife has ever sailed. 

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Roam

Member
103
47
I'm a big fan of Graham's boats and of Graham. He not only helped me with advice in building the dinghy, but also in delivering our first boat to MA from NC. I built a nesting Spindrift 10 in 1995 for our first 2 year cruise and we rowed it everywhere as we didn't take an outboard. It was still going strong in 2006 when I finally got around to completing the sailing rig. It has been our favourite dinghy ever, but sadly got left behind with another family in favour of a big RIB and outboard when we headed off cruising a second time in 2012. 

We just used bolts with washers and wingnuts to connect the two parts. It was always a bit awkward putting it together, either on the deck or in the water, but we got pretty good at it.  On the Spindrift there were doublers on the bulkheads where the bolts went through. A tiny bit of water would leak through the holes around the bolts, but not enough to ever be an issue.
Nice Spindrift.  I'm boat shopping now and I'm hoping to get something that will allow me to carry my Spindrift assembled but if not, well that's why I built a nesting dinghy.

The solution to water leaking in around the bolts is to have a rubber washer between the hulls. I believe Chesapeake Light Craft puts a rubber sheet between the hulls. I'll get around to this eventually but right now just having rubber washers between the hulls is working to keep the water out.

A few pictures of my Spindrift 11N. 

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Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,122
5,034
Canada
Since I designed a nesting dinghy and had years of using one: you can put rubber washers under a fender washer on each side of the mating bulkhead. I used bolts with wing nuts and it was simple to joint part 1 & 2 this way. Kept the water out just fine.

 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
9,624
3,032
Tasmania, Australia
Since I designed a nesting dinghy and had years of using one: you can put rubber washers under a fender washer on each side of the mating bulkhead. I used bolts with wing nuts and it was simple to joint part 1 & 2 this way. Kept the water out just fine.
I've got a Chameleon - bought it, not built it. It came with bolts and wing nuts. They drove *me* (more) nuts so I welded up some captive nuts on backing plates, screwed them to one half and made big knobs from hardwood with M12 stainless allthread epoxied into them. Much quicker & easier.

However it's still a PITA to assemble/disassemble so in the end I designed & made a set of davits and now carry my 8' aluminium dinghy. Takes about 2 minutes to launch/retrieve it. More beamy & virtually indestructible. Doesn't sail of course. Not a good blue water option IMO but currently that's not an issue.

I did add hard lifting points to the Chameleon so I can carry it in davits assembled but as there are no drain ports and it's not really designed to take that sort of lifting stress, it'd only be done for short hops or similar.

FKT

 
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