Dinghy Racing/Olympic Class

Gotta Go

New member
Hi Everyone,

I need some direction and you guys are the best.  I currently own an S2 7.9 that I have raced, very successfully on a club level in PHRF.  I am now looking for an aggressive dinghy to sail at a national level.  I am 6'1" and 210 lbs, sailing weight 204.  I've done a lot or research and found the Finn Dinghy because: 1, it is an olympic class boat and 2, Although very technical, it is made for bigger guys like me.  I am a former triathlete and weight lifter so the aggressive boat doesn't scare me.  Now finding out that it is not longer an Olympic Class boat (after 2021, it was dropped) is a deterrent.  I figure I'm too big to compete in a laser and dropping that much weight would adversely affect my life.  Is there another high profile boat to compete in?

Second question.  My club has a championship every year, besides fleets, in which we compete in sunfish sailboats.  I was considering purchasing a new one and also racing it on a national level.  Because of my weight and size, am I going to not be able to compete against 150 lb people and therefore will never have an opportunity to win, even though my skills may be on par with them?

Thanks

 

some dude

Super Anarchist
4,161
155
You weren't going to the Olympics anyway.  You're a Finn sailor. Stop resisting

Where are you?   Regatta at SDYC 12/12-13. 

 

Rum Runner

Rum Runner
5,266
291
Illinois
Why your hang up on Olympic class boats? Find a fleet where you are comfortable and competitive and go for it. As some dude said, you will never be in the Olympics. Why not compete against a group of people you have fun with and enjoy? 

 

Wavedancer II

Anarchist
696
168
1. Winning isn't everything...

2. 204 lbs isn't outrageous for a Laser sailor and you might do really well if the breeze is up (>15 mph).

 
You are prime 505 crew material. 
 

Possibly the nicest sailing, most fun boat to sail ever. 
 

Since you aren’t going to the Olympics you may as well enjoy sailing (Finns look like a lot of work). 

 

Spoonie

Anarchist
742
91
Sydney
1. Winning isn't everything...

2. 204 lbs isn't outrageous for a Laser sailor and you might do really well if the breeze is up (>15 mph).
92kg’s is definitely on the heavier end for a laser.   he will have to work pretty hard in the lighter stuff but yes, will likely fair well in the heavier stuff.   

 

garrett818

Member
116
0
Perfect I14 crew weight! If you aren't going to the Olympics there's no reason to sail an Olympic class. Stick with better built, cheaper equipment. 505, I14, F18 etc.

 

wpbeardsley

Member
375
5
Sail whatever they either have a lot of in your area or whatever makes you want to go sailing the most.  At 204 lbs, you can still make it work in a Laser or even a Sunfish.  Yes there will be days when the lighter guys eat your lunch, esp. downwind, but upwind in breeze they'll wish they were in your boat.  If you're looking to really campaign something hard and be competitive nationally, there are still a few pockets of Finn sailing in North America and most of those guys I don't think are aspiring to go to the Olympics (esp. now that there's no longer a winner-take-all trials) but are still getting decent turnouts for their larger events.  I am on the wrong side of 190 lbs these days and still sail Sunfish and Lasers locally and enjoy it.  Not out there trying to win a major class championship in those like we are in our Viper 640 but that's ok, and it's a good excuse for me to try to at least not get heavier, if not in better shape. Paul-Jon Patin is sometimes around 190 lbs and still does very well in Sunfish internationally even in lighter conditions (top 3 at the Worlds close to a dozen times and a masters champ), and it sounds like it may be a good excuse for you to practice for your club championship.  If there are 505s in your area, getting on the wire in a 505 is great too if you have a friend who can drive - plenty of 505 crews own their own boats and source drivers as needed.  

 

RSsailingNA

Member
110
76
Boston, MA
Shameless plug, but check out the RS Aero, the 9 rig is about 15 sq feet more than a Laser, with a hull that weighs half as much and a higher boom. 

20ish boats at Cedar Point Yacht Club in Westport, they race all summer and frostbite and some travel to Florida to race in the Winter Series there.

I can definitely help get you on one to try it if you'd like.

 

Couta

Super Anarchist
1,075
767
Australia
Finn....you want world class competition against the legends of sailing? wanna benchmark? want to hang out with some of the best informed, physically fit and intellectual sailing gurus? How about some of the most friendly, encouraging and knowledgeable bunch of buggas you're ever likely to meet on a beach or start line? You had the answer all along! 

 
A

Amati

Guest
Contender?  Tres chic!

1E706F60-AF3A-4E2F-A2C3-EAE749DF798F.jpeg

 
Last edited:
A

Amati

Guest
As long as you are flexible enough to get under than boom.

II think the OP has left the building.
I have some scars on my shoulder blades from from Finn tacks.  You can’t roll under a Contender Boom?  Bailers?  Not enough room in back of the centerboard?

 
Last edited:

maxstaylock

Anarchist
663
380
The Finn will steal your lunch money, and leave you crying and broken in the gutter, so you think you are a man?

Prove me wrong.

 
A

Amati

Guest
The Finn will steal your lunch money, and leave you crying and broken in the gutter, so you think you are a man?

Prove me wrong.
I’d hate to prove I’m a wimp?  But I never lost any teeth sailing a Finn, so.... what price pleasure?

 

SailMoore1

Member
256
16
California
Gotta Go, the Finn is a great boat and so much more than the Olympics. Most people that sail the Finn have no intention of ever going the Olympic route. I am north of 200 and have a Finn and Laser.  Sail both regularly. But preference is the Finn. Looks like you are out of Connecticut. You will have to work hard to get Finns out in that area. The Laser might be a better option if one design racing is what you are looking for.

 
Top