Dinghy Wear

kurio99

Member
It's that time of year again when clothing choice becomes difficult.  The water is 7C while air can be 20C.  Have you found the right combination of topside comfort and immersion safety?

I have a 5/4/3 wetsuit that is killing me.  My friends have drysuits, but they seem fragile with leaks being a regular nuisance.  I'm considering a paddling dry top with lighter weight farmer john wetsuit, but that may be too thin for 7C.

 

TeamFugu

Super Anarchist
5,049
33
SLC, UT
I have a pretty heavy skiff farmer John that I wear all of the time. As much for protection from getting cut as for warmth. If it is too hot, I just roll it down to my waist and select what is comfortable on top. I was taking a lot of crap from my mates one day. It was 90F in the shade and I was there in my wetsuit. Then a cat came in to the beach and the lovely woman hopped off the boat with a six inch long and about half inch deep gash in her leg. I pointed it out and said to my mates, "That's why I wear this all of the time." 

 

LTFF

Member
101
35
I’ve been pretty comfortable in the zhik superwarm skiff suit its nice because it’s sleeveless so you can wear whatever underneath based on the air temp, it gets a little hot on warm sunny days but you can always go in the cold water to cool off

 

Locus

locus
776
99
Seattle, WA
Here in the PNW water is always 52f (11c) I wear just the standard Zhik farmer john, fleece top or rashguard depending on how cold the air is, and a Gill dinghy smock. 

The smock keeps the top half pretty dry and the wetsuit works well in the water. I went in a couple weeks ago, 50 degrees air and water. Didn't really notice the water temp and was fine on the boat. 

Now in the summer when the wind dies and we are sitting out there baking, the wetsuit can be hot. I usually roll down the top and take off the smock. 

For winter sailing i put a layer of clark longjohns and top under the wetsuit to add additional warmth for when the air is really cold. Wetsuit does not do a great job when its dry. 

 
0429-kanye-west-shoes-x17-4.jpg


 

sail(plane)

Anarchist
688
106
It's that time of year again when clothing choice becomes difficult.  The water is 7C while air can be 20C.  Have you found the right combination of topside comfort and immersion safety?

I have a 5/4/3 wetsuit that is killing me.  My friends have drysuits, but they seem fragile with leaks being a regular nuisance.  I'm considering a paddling dry top with lighter weight farmer john wetsuit, but that may be too thin for 7C.
Maybe SHARKSKIN, because you need ptotection from the 7C water but also cope with warmer air temps.

Out of the water:

It is similar to a wetsuit, but more flexible, and most of all, it breathes. It will let out the sweat so you are dry on the inside. (some people even use it inside a drysuit)

it is good protection from the wind, even when wet.

When soaking wet from having been in the water, it FEELS dry, it`s like magic. It takes up alot of water, much more than a wetsuit, but it drains and dries very fast. You don`t feel the water anyway.

You do need to layer up because by itself is equivalent to 2-3 mm of neoprene. Sharkskin+dinghy top or maybe dry gear. Sharkskin socks are fantastic as well. (did I say they feel dry even soaking wet?)

IN the water:

While in the water, it is not as good as a wetsuit because it gets very wet and bags out a little. You need to make sure it is tight.It should be OK for the occasional capsize and recovery.

 

fastyacht

Super Anarchist
12,928
2,597
Maybe SHARKSKIN, because you need ptotection from the 7C water but also cope with warmer air temps.

Out of the water:

It is similar to a wetsuit, but more flexible, and most of all, it breathes. It will let out the sweat so you are dry on the inside. (some people even use it inside a drysuit)

it is good protection from the wind, even when wet.

When soaking wet from having been in the water, it FEELS dry, it`s like magic. It takes up alot of water, much more than a wetsuit, but it drains and dries very fast. You don`t feel the water anyway.

You do need to layer up because by itself is equivalent to 2-3 mm of neoprene. Sharkskin+dinghy top or maybe dry gear. Sharkskin socks are fantastic as well. (did I say they feel dry even soaking wet?)

IN the water:

While in the water, it is not as good as a wetsuit because it gets very wet and bags out a little. You need to make sure it is tight.It should be OK for the occasional capsize and recovery.
My grandmother's tennis dress was made of "sharksin." She was born in 1899. Something tells me this is a different sharkskin.

 
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sail(plane)

Anarchist
688
106
My grandmother's tennis dress was made of "sharksin." She was born in 1902. Something tells me this is a different sharkskin.
it sounded so weird I had to google it, and yes...

Hedge-Tennis-Blog-Email-hedder_1024x.jpg


but this sharkskin would not be good in a firehose 15kt beam reach, try the new one

 
I’ve been pretty comfortable in the zhik superwarm skiff suit its nice because it’s sleeveless so you can wear whatever underneath based on the air temp, it gets a little hot on warm sunny days but you can always go in the cold water to cool off
I wear the same and am usually quite comfortable. Our water temperature is usually around 8 or 9 degrees with air temperature occasionally reaching the 20s. I usually wear a Zhik Titanium top as well to protect myself from splashes. If it's particularly warm I'll just wear the wetsuit with no top.

 

SamuraiEv

New member
10
8
I’m also in Toronto, and am comfortable this time of year with the zhik superwarm skiff suit, then go with a superwarm top and spray top if really cold and reduce to lighter neoprene/rash guard top when it gets warmer out. I’ve found the key is keeping your legs and feet warm then the rest follows, so I wear gill fleece socks under skiff boots

 




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