Dockside Water Filter recommendations

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
I have been using the following water filter on my dockside water hookup, but, its reducing the water flow so badly that the water pressure is terrible. Is there a better one to use that wont restrict the flow so much?
1660450122952.png
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
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5,621
Canada
Is this for taste or a water softener?

Probably not much surface area in that little filter? Maybe the standard 10" type and whatever filter cartridge you want. The ones you show are 20 micron which is good as a particle filter. Easy to get replacement 20 micron types for the 10"

1660456252136.png
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
Is this for taste or a water softener?

Probably not much surface area in that little filter? Maybe the standard 10" type and whatever filter cartridge you want. The ones you show are 20 micron which is good as a particle filter. Easy to get replacement 20 micron types for the 10"

View attachment 534270
Just for taste, and cleaning the water of anything bad. I was wondering about the larger filters. I guess they would have better flow than these skinny ones.
 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,664
5,621
Canada
Well for taste get a charcoal cartridge. Change it every 6 months because eventually bad bacteria can grow in them. Drain the housings in winter if you live in a cold place.
 
The one Zonker showed is cheap and available almost anywhere. The charcoal element should do what you want, the other elements for little creatures will drop your flow considerably, you can go up a size from the 10" to get more volume if you need the better element. Another note only use the dark canister, not a clear one, same with the hose. Clear or white tend to grow things if left charged in the sun. If you drain and stow between use not a problem, but if left hooked up it is.

Also since they are cheep you could use two of the ten inch in parallel with the better filter, home Depot sells all the stuff, we used them as they seem to be everywhere we went, or the home doit center's.
 
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toddster

Super Anarchist
4,262
998
The Gorge
Well for taste get a charcoal cartridge. Change it every 6 months hours because eventually bad bacteria can grow in them. Drain the housings in winter if you live in a cold place.
FIFY. Not necessarily bad bacteria, but lots of bacteria, and lots of bacteria isn't good.
 

2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
The standard 10" type are what I use in my stick house, with a 1 micron filter. (Well, actually, 20", which are the same thing but in a larger housing so they don't have to be replaced as often. I get 3-6 months) Mainly it gets particulate iron and manganese, which makes the (ion-exchange) water softener's life easier. That's with city water that is chlorinated, so that bacteria are not a concern. For drinking water there is a separate 10" filter with an activated charcoal cartridge mainly to get rid of the chlorine. The 10" cartridges are cheap and readily available. I get them from https://affordablewater.us/ or from Grainger depending on who is cheapest.

Filtration is always something you select based on what you want to remove.

The problem with the 10" cartridge filters is that they're bulky and messy to work with at the end of a hose when filling tanks. I too would like to find a solution that is more convenient but still cost effective.
 

SimonGH

Member
409
88
Westbrook CT
For a dockside hookup (i.e. city water) then you can engineer the cartridge filter setup into your city water hookup plumbing before it gets to the rest of your boat (i.e. put it right after the inlet/regulator). I'd also verify that it's the filter that's reducing pressure. Since your city water shouldn't be filling your tanks, you can hook up temporarily without the filter and see if pressure improves. If it doesn't, then it may be your inlet regulator (almost all of them have pressure reducers for shore water that has too high pressure). Typically it drops it down to ~45psi no matter how high the city pressure is...

Just realize that if you put a canister filter in place, you'll need to have good access to it, and space below to drop the cansiter to remove the filter, as well as in a location that will inevitably get wet (and possibly dirty) from filter changes...
 

claudiajohnston

New member
27
5
The standard 10" type are what I use in my stick house, with a 1 micron filter. (Well, actually, 20", which are the same thing but in a larger housing so they don't have to be replaced as often. I get 3-6 months) Mainly it gets particulate iron and manganese, which makes the (ion-exchange) water softener's life easier. That's with city water that is chlorinated, so that bacteria are not a concern. For drinking water there is a separate 10" filter with an activated charcoal cartridge mainly to get rid of the chlorine. The 10" cartridges are cheap and readily available. I get them from https://affordablewater.us/ or from Grainger depending on who is cheapest.

Filtration is always something you select based on what you want to remove.

The problem with the 10" cartridge filters is that they're bulky and messy to work with at the end of a hose when filling tanks. I too would like to find a solution that is more convenient but still cost effective of Inmate Lookup.
I'm looking for suggestions on a good dockside water filtration unit to interface between shore water and my hose running to the boat. I'm not looking for a plumbing project but rather a plug and play setup which will not compromise flow rate. I've seen a few out there and I'm willing to spend what it takes on the right one so I'm looking for some experience-based feedback from anyone who has a recommendation that fits the bill for my 50' M/Y.

Thanks!
 

MauiPunter

Will sail for food
I'm looking for suggestions on a good dockside water filtration unit to interface between shore water and my hose running to the boat. I'm not looking for a plumbing project but rather a plug and play setup which will not compromise flow rate. I've seen a few out there and I'm willing to spend what it takes on the right one so I'm looking for some experience-based feedback from anyone who has a recommendation that fits the bill for my 50' M/Y.

Thanks!
I've been using the one Zonker recommended above. One end plugs into the dock water, and the other end into the boat. It's as easy as connecting a garden hose.

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gkny

Member
356
33
If you are going to use two filters, the first filter should be for bigger stuff and this will help The 2nd and finer filter from Getting clogged so quickly
 




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