Does this reefing line look right?

Quickstep192

Anarchist
845
160
Chesapeake
I put in a reef today and noticed that the loop around the boom prevented the reefing line from pulling the sail fully aft

Should this be rigged differently?

D6DE2A72-C35C-456C-B696-CAEC4ABCC205.jpeg
 

Quickstep192

Anarchist
845
160
Chesapeake
Would it be best to have an eye with a thimble?

Also, on my prior (smaller) boat, the aft end of the reefing line terminated in an eye on the side of the boom. Is that not cricket on a larger boat?
 
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longy

Overlord of Anarchy
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San Diego
Getting the reef clew right down on the boom is nice but not 100% necessary. Sometimes a gap is needed to allow the reefed sail material to exist without being seriously crushed. If you had started the reef process on the other tack, much of the sail material would be stuck under the reef clew. So clew down enuff to keep it fixed in position is what is needed - within a foot of the boom.
Having the reef line looped around the boom will allow the loop to slowly slide aft on the boom, which can over stress the foot of the sail. Having the reef line 'cinched' around the boom will eliminate most of the creep. In the old days one would tie a timber hitch around the boom. Having some hardware on the boom that fixes the loop is good - but if you switch mainsails they will be out of position.
With a reef tucked in like pic, tie a 'safety strop' thru the reef clew & around the boom. This is a backup to prevent damage if the reef line breaks. Those 'press rings' used for the grommet are two pieces and can end up with a ridge at the joint which will chafe right thru a reef line given enuff time
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
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1,156
San Diego
They let you achieve a consistent reefed sail - the dead end is always in the same place. They let you rig a safety strop that is fixed on the boom. In fact you can set the strop & release the tension completely on the reef line.
 

Bump-n-Grind

Get off my lawn.
14,775
3,565
Chesapeake Bay/Vail
They let you achieve a consistent reefed sail - the dead end is always in the same place. They let you rig a safety strop that is fixed on the boom. In fact you can set the strop & release the tension completely on the reef line.
which might come in handy on a big ass swan, but not really necessary on a J92.
 

atnan

Member
140
69
Alameda, CA
I make one of these per reef-point, + an extra in case I want to rig up a preventer:



I usually make them the boom's circumference, then pre-stretch and slide over the boom end (i.e. not with a dog-bone like the preview above).

The advantage over just tying the reef line to the boom is that it's less fiddly / error-prone and easy to describe to someone who hasn't done it before, the cover is extra slippery so it automatically slides to below the reef point as the reef is pulled in, and it distributes the load around the boom compared to a fixed pad-eye / can move with the reef point as the sail ages or you buy new sails.
 

Kenny Dumas

Super Anarchist
1,226
467
PDX
I disagree with the cinch methods. Pinching the sail (and battens) is bad. Your bowline looks good to me. It allows you to crank on more outhaul also
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
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1,156
San Diego
Yes, smashing any flavor of sail cloth is not conducive to longevity of same. If you lead the fall (after going thru clew) of the reef line around to same side of boom as upward length it will (mostly) keep bunt of sail clear of line. Sometimes (depending on tack) you just have to stop halfway & yand the cloth free. In the perfect world you'd pull the reef clew down, strop it around, then use reef line to shape the sail. When wind eases, sometimes just putting some shape back into the bottom of the sail will do to get sail powered up again
 

El Borracho

Verified User
6,698
2,664
Pacific Rim
We usually loop around and tie relatively tightly to the boom. First bcuz the knot getting near the cringle is an issue. Second bcuz if loose it tends to wander fore and aft to cause a problem when reefing time comes.

We always reef on starboard tack. The reef lines are all on starboard so no need to ever cross to or work on the low side. All the sail cloth and all the luff flakes go to leeward. The outhauls are run thru the cringles such that the down part does not pinch cloth or battens.

Padeyes could work if seriously strong. Seems like a waste, though. Extra cranial damage is a possibility.

The clew should really be ground all the way down to the boom for trim, style points, and to keep the boom out of the seas.

A clew lashing is prudent in a long blow. I would not ease the outhaul though as a very flat sail is best.

Cruisers should tack onto port as a squall approaches as a great quantity of rainwater may be collected from the sail folds aft.
 

ryley

Super Anarchist
5,520
668
Boston, MA
I have moved away from using a bowline and gone to using a timber hitch. it gives you unlimited ability to pull down and back, but can easily be undone no matter how much pressure it's been under. I was originally afraid it would shake out when not reefed but two of them made it to bermuda and back on my Freedom 45 last year.

 

Marty Gingras

Mid-range Anarchist
I have moved away from using a bowline and gone to using a timber hitch. it gives you unlimited ability to pull down and back, but can easily be undone no matter how much pressure it's been under. I was originally afraid it would shake out when not reefed but two of them made it to bermuda and back on my Freedom 45 last year.

Looks scary but makes sense.
 




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