Don't MoveTo Florida

Jules

Super Anarchist
8,664
3,458
Punta Gorda
We have a pair of them up the street -
The neighborhood we're now in used to be populated with Old Florida bungalows, like the one we live in now. But little by little, the old houses like this
1669465156837.png

are being torn down and replaced with homes that are often no more in square footage as the ones they replaced. BUT! They look bigger because they have high ceilings and columned fronts. And they are new and all mostly alike.
1669465269189.png
This style is so common around here now.

And it seems after home prices skyrocketed here, it created an urgency to buy high, as irrational as that is. Of course many long time residents cashed in and with that brought in a wealthier crowd, many of whom seem a bit less friendly. But that could just be my perception. I do own an old home.
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Jules, are these home remodels restricted in size by maximum coverage, per zoning? That's the only reason I can think of for them not being made larger which is all the fashion here. We lived for 30 years in a 2,000 sq. ft. Ranch house on a waterfront acre with dock, on a Cove of the lower CT River. When our daughters moved to S. Carolina, never to return but for visits, it was time to downsize. The developer who bought our home purchased it only to tear it down and build a McMansion of 6,500 sq. ft. and now asking $6.5 Million, which we think is ridiculous, but it seems there is more money than brains among the New York, Boston and Fairfield County buyers swarming to our area. After a banner year in sales, it is much slower now, and interest rates likely have a part to play in that.
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,810
1,994
Punta Gorda FL
Jules, are these home remodels restricted in size by maximum coverage, per zoning? That's the only reason I can think of for them not being made larger which is all the fashion here.
50% rule.

Bottom line: if Jules or another old home owner does enough work, the WHOLE home has to be brought up to modern codes. And it's always cheaper to just knock it down and start over than to do that, largely because the whole thing needs to be raised and they're concrete slabs.
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
50% rule.

Bottom line: if Jules or another old home owner does enough work, the WHOLE home has to be brought up to modern codes. And it's always cheaper to just knock it down and start over than to do that, largely because the whole thing needs to be raised and they're concrete slabs.

Thanks Tom!! If I understand it the 50% rule has to do with how much of the home is original versus redone, is that right? I was specifically asking about coverage, which is limited by zoning here in our area of New England.
 

Not for nothing

Super Anarchist
3,544
834
jupiter
The neighborhood we're now in used to be populated with Old Florida bungalows, like the one we live in now. But little by little, the old houses like this
View attachment 555923
are being torn down and replaced with homes that are often no more in square footage as the ones they replaced. BUT! They look bigger because they have high ceilings and columned fronts. And they are new and all mostly alike.
View attachment 555924 This style is so common around here now.

And it seems after home prices skyrocketed here, it created an urgency to buy high, as irrational as that is. Of course many long time residents cashed in and with that brought in a wealthier crowd, many of whom seem a bit less friendly. But that could just be my perception. I do own an old home.
Funny the old house looks great, The new no so good, just typical of all the houses being built
down here, just another example of stupid people with stupid money building stupid homes.
On another note, drove to Bathtub beach, the road that was under water in Nicole,
What do I see a brand new foundation just feet away from the ocean, wtf
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,810
1,994
Punta Gorda FL
Thanks Tom!! If I understand it the 50% rule has to do with how much of the home is original versus redone, is that right? I was specifically asking about coverage, which is limited by zoning here in our area of New England.
Yes, you're right in effect. We also have setback rules and square footage rules but those are not what typically dictate that a house be torn down vs remodeled. It's the price of the waterfront lots and the 50% rule that mean it just makes sense to tear down and build new.

The other reason would be wanting a higher floor elevation. We didn't get the flooding from hurricane Ian here like they got down in Fort FatGrifter to the South of us. We could next time.
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Yes, you're right in effect. We also have setback rules and square footage rules but those are not what typically dictate that a house be torn down vs remodeled. It's the price of the waterfront lots and the 50% rule that mean it just makes sense to tear down and build new.

The other reason would be wanting a higher floor elevation. We didn't get the flooding from hurricane Ian here like they got down in Fort FatGrifter to the South of us. We could next time.

I was curious why the developers in Jules neighborhoods are not making the renovated homes much larger, which is all the rage up here, and it sounds like there are footprint area coverage and setback requirements similar to our zoning regs.
 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
69,999
13,202
Great Wet North
View attachment 555924 This style is so common around here now.
Not dissimilar to what is going on here - maybe a bit small. ;)

One thing that amuses me about them - in an effort to make them look bigger they have extremely complex roof shapes - loaded with dormers & gables.

Obviously the cost of future re-roofing was never considered and is going to be a hell of a shock. The house near me that I mentioned will probably cost 6 figures, even for cheap shingles.
 

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
5,569
1,181
So if the repairs are deemed to be greater than the “value “
That would mean a total loss, how is the amount of the insurance check calculated?
Sounds terrible for the homeowner
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Not dissimilar to what is going on here - maybe a bit small. ;)

One thing that amuses me about them - in an effort to make them look bigger they have extremely complex roof shapes - loaded with dormers & gables.

Obviously the cost of future re-roofing was never considered and is going to be a hell of a shock. The house near me that I mentioned will probably cost 6 figures, even for cheap shingles.

The more dormers and gables, the many more "Benjamins" the Architect stuffed his pockets with, as well as the pockets of the Contractor who built it!
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,810
1,994
Punta Gorda FL
So if the repairs are deemed to be greater than the “value “
That would mean a total loss, how is the amount of the insurance check calculated?
Sounds terrible for the homeowner
It's greater than half the value, which is why it's a 50 percent rule.

It can work out badly for home owners. We had friends whose house was badly damaged by Charlie. They started rebuilding and spent quite a bit of money before being told, "Nope, 50% rule, bring the whole thing up to code or tear it down." They sold and left instead.
 

Jules

Super Anarchist
8,664
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Punta Gorda
Jules, are these home remodels restricted in size by maximum coverage, per zoning?
Most of the lots in my area are only 80'x200' and builders build right to the buidable lines. If you want a 3 car garage or a pool or any other space taking element, it has to come out of the home's SQ/FT-age. Out house is bit under 2200 SQ/FT. That's maybe 200-300 SQ/FT less than most of the new ones, at least the ones without a 2nd floor. But now I'm seeing that 2nd floor on more houses.
 

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
5,569
1,181
Most of the lots in my area are only 80'x200' and builders build right to the buidable lines. If you want a 3 car garage or a pool or any other space taking element, it has to come out of the home's SQ/FT-age. Out house is bit under 2200 SQ/FT. That's maybe 200-300 SQ/FT less than most of the new ones, at least the ones without a 2nd floor. But now I'm seeing that 2nd floor on more houses.
Yes and the second floor because of the flood zone and elevation above the bayou
Sadly tis’ the history of Florida
 

Jules

Super Anarchist
8,664
3,458
Punta Gorda
So if the repairs are deemed to be greater than the “value “
That would mean a total loss, how is the amount of the insurance check calculated?
Sounds terrible for the homeowner
...greater than 50% of the appraised value of the building. So if you bought a house for $500K and the land is valued at $300K, the building is valued at $200K. If repairs or remodeling exceed $100K, you have to bring the whole house up to code. And that includes the elevation.

That means if your house is below base flood elevation (BFE) you either have to raise it up or tear it down and rebuild. Or sell it as is.

As for insurance, if you did your homework you can walk away pretty much fully reimbursed, unless the damage is from storm surge where you're capped at $250K
 

veni vidi vici

Omne quod audimus est opinio, non res. Omnia videm
5,569
1,181
...greater than 50% of the appraised value of the building. So if you bought a house for $500K and the land is valued at $300K, the building is valued at $200K. If repairs or remodeling exceed $100K, you have to bring the whole house up to code. And that includes the elevation.

That means if your house is below base flood elevation (BFE) you either have to raise it up or tear it down and rebuild. Or sell it as is.
Me thinks those insurance political contributions are paying off big time!
 

billy backstay

Backstay, never bought a suit, never went to Vegas
Most of the lots in my area are only 80'x200' and builders build right to the buidable lines. If you want a 3 car garage or a pool or any other space taking element, it has to come out of the home's SQ/FT-age. Out house is bit under 2200 SQ/FT. That's maybe 200-300 SQ/FT less than most of the new ones, at least the ones without a 2nd floor. But now I'm seeing that 2nd floor on more houses.

Adding a 2nd floor is always the most economic way to add square footage, and without increasing ones footprint. OTOH, many of us prefer one floor living, as we get older! :unsure:
 

Max Rockatansky

DILLIGAF?
4,031
1,099
The neighborhood we're now in used to be populated with Old Florida bungalows, like the one we live in now. But little by little, the old houses like this
View attachment 555923
are being torn down and replaced with homes that are often no more in square footage as the ones they replaced. BUT! They look bigger because they have high ceilings and columned fronts. And they are new and all mostly alike.
View attachment 555924 This style is so common around here now.
I always called that style of house ‘Florida Drug Dealer’
 

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