Drones or Queens

Do you own a boat

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

luminary

Anarchist
714
54
I'm curious about the kind of work that provides sufficient income to support a sailing habit. I've a pair of graduate degrees and typically consult. I personally funded the last recession (2001) and am getting kicked in the teeth again by the current economy. Yet I know trades and semi-skilled friends who are doing well even now.

My boat, small as it is, is taking a long time to build as a result of these fluctuations. So I am curious about the strategy taken by others to enable them to support a sailing habit in these times.

(Only get 5 options so the poll is a bit limited....)

 

PuffyJman

Super Anarchist
3,659
7
panhandle fla
I'm curious about the kind of work that provides sufficient income to support a sailing habit. I've a pair of graduate degrees and typically consult. I personally funded the last recession (2001) and am getting kicked in the teeth again by the current economy. Yet I know trades and semi-skilled friends who are doing well even now.
My boat, small as it is, is taking a long time to build as a result of these fluctuations. So I am curious about the strategy taken by others to enable them to support a sailing habit in these times.

(Only get 5 options so the poll is a bit limited....)

Trust fund baby.

ps I am not that lucky!

 
I have been a business owner and an employee. But, it has always been important to me to be on the water, so I (we, as a family) have given up other things in our lives to sail. I've rebuilt boats I've bought for short money (I have some interesting stories about my Pearson Ensign and the things I learned rebuilding it) I've partnered in bigger boats with friends and family and generally done whatever I could to stay on the water. If you love sailing, you do what you have to do. When we sold our last boat 6 years ago, knowing the move from the East to West coast was temporary, we've set aside money each month in our boat fund. We've used some of it to charter and the balance is going to buy another boat when we get back to NE later this summer. (It has been refreshing to not have entered a West Marine for 6 years!) With our "boat fund" in the bank, we've had a great time, looking at boats, planning and dreaming about sailing with friends, family and sticking the bow into a race or two. I've missed regular sailing and owning a boat, since the past 6 years is the longest I can remember being boatless...but crewing and chartering have filled the gap and knowing that when our California tour ended we'd be ready to buy again has kept us focused on the future. If sailing and ownership are important, most of us have to give up something else to do it...the really, really rich guys I know in sailing set their sights much higher than the rest of us, so when they order the new tricked out Alden 54, they give up something. Guys in racing spend 100's of thousands of dollars every year on their boats, crews, travel, etc..believe me they're giving something up, too! We could have a bigger house, I could race vintage sports cars, we could spend a month in Italy, we could buy a vacation home. We choose to put that money into sailing because that's what we love and that's what makes us happy. In the past two years, I've had a life long friend die of cancer less than a year after he sold his business, another just had a quad by-pass and I'm seeing another later this week who is re-hab because of stroke. Life is short, you need to do what makes you smile, there is nothing like being anchored in a new harbor after a long day of sailing and have your wife turn to you, smile and say, "This is nice, really nice."

 

Jangles13

Anarchist
774
7
Maine
I'm a residential construction contractor, but let me say if I lived in a different part of the country I might not be able to afford owning and sailing a keel boat. My annual boat budget is <$2k, which I gather is what many people spend on slips...

 

Derek Grebe

Super Anarchist
6,127
109
Dubai, UAE
i own my own cat, but it's not a money pit, and i do what i want / upgrade as and when i can afford it.

yes, running a big programme makes a big hole in one's pocket, but a sailing habit can be cheaper to manage than even the most innocuous sports.

as boats often require 3 to 12 bodies, and we assume that usually only one of those bodies actually owns and funds the hardware, a sailing habit can be well maintained for the cost of new gear every once in a while.

It is the drinking habit associated with the sailing habit that requires one to be 'independently wealthy'

 
I'm a residential construction contractor, but let me say if I lived in a different part of the country I might not be able to afford owning and sailing a keel boat. My annual boat budget is <$2k, which I gather is what many people spend on slips...
The slip cost in California are outrageous, probably the biggest reason we never bought a boat during our 6 years out here, we came close a few years ago and with the payments and the slip we'd have been pushing $1,800 a month plus "utilities".

 

#13

Super Anarchist
Silicon valley sales guy.

Do well, and keep the "big" boat campaign as gold-plated as I would like, of course "big" is 28' with a crew of 5. Other boat is an 18' two man keel boat, which is more cost effective in this economy.

Due to very young children and a lack of a real fleet this summer, my only racing is OD in the 18'.

So, let the funds sit in the bank rather than tithing at the marine industry establishments I indulge in.

Cheers,

#13

 
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