Dyer Dhow Rehab

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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Edgewater, MD
White oak is a good choice for steam bending, although that's a pretty serious curve around the bow so if there's much grain runout then you might run into problems.

Rule of thumb is 15 minutes in the steambox for every 1/4" of thickness.

When building the steam box, try and insulate it a bit to keep the heat in. It's actually the heat that lets you bend - the steam is only a convenient way to transport that heat.  I would angle the box up from the kettle, and leave an opening at the far end so you get good flow of hot steam along the length.

You want to get some bend into the wood ASAP after pulling it out of the box. Put a good bend in that bow portion with your hands as you carry it over to the boat, then fine tune it in place. Getting the major bend in immediately before it cools makes a big difference.
Question on this:

I'm not positive, but I think it's actually two pieces of wood, joined at the bow with some kind of scarfing joint? I intend to check out the wooden boat forums linked in this thread to find out.

In any case, you're right about the need for speed. I intend to have a shit load of speed clamps at the ready and extra hands. I want it clamped to the hull in 15-30 seconds.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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Edgewater, MD
Oh wow, that's a lot.  The old thread that I found on WBF had it for $95, which is in the "of course I'll go that route" option.
$500 is what I'm hearing on the Dyer Facebook page. Maybe they are unaware of a cheaper source.

 

andykane

Member
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Victoria, BC
I'm not positive, but I think it's actually two pieces of wood, joined at the bow with some kind of scarfing joint? I intend to check out the wooden boat forums linked in this thread to find out.
Oh, I'm sure you're right. I was just thinking of the curve on each side being sharper than your typical gunwale.

 

2airishuman

Anarchist
Question on this:

I'm not positive, but I think it's actually two pieces of wood, joined at the bow with some kind of scarfing joint? I intend to check out the wooden boat forums linked in this thread to find out.

In any case, you're right about the need for speed. I intend to have a shit load of speed clamps at the ready and extra hands. I want it clamped to the hull in 15-30 seconds.
You would want the scarf joint(s) in the straightest area possible and would want the inwale and outwale scarfs in separate places rather than right across from each other.  You might need, two scarf joints, to make the gunwales work with the lumber available and the size of steamer you're willing to build.

I wouldn't clamp it to the hull.  Make a jig.  There's going to be a fair amount of force involved and it would tend to distort the fiberglass hull.  You can use the same jig for the inwale and the outwale as long as you wait half an hour to unclamp the first one and then attach it to the boat or something to hold its shape while it dries.  The curve doesn't have to be perfect because there will be some give in the wood to allow for final adjustment.  As with a laminate, the attachment of the two pieces (inwale and outwale) to the hull using adhesive and/or fasteners so they cannot slide relative to each other will be what holds the exact shape.

That's a pretty deep curve.  Might want to get some extra wood to save yourself a trip to the yard if the whole thing explodes on you just when you think you have it in the right shape.  It can happen, ask me how I know.

 
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I dont think I paid $500 for the wood, but given the pre-bend it had and it being custom built for the boat, I would never attempt this job with a DIY coaming.  Not an easy job.  Building steam boxes etc... it seems it may be costing more (time) than you think and be closer to a pre-cut piece.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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Edgewater, MD
@sail69 Ok, here's the patient.  Your wood rails seem to be much thicker than mine. My wood pieces are .5 inches each for a total of 1-1/8 thickness including the fiberglass hull.

You're saying that you bought that piece(s) from Anchorage?

@2airishuman you're saying that the scarf joints will be along the gunwales and not in the curve at the bow? Hmmm, amazing to bend a piece of wood that sharply even with a steam box and not have it explode!

Hmm...the forum isn't letting me post these photos.



 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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2,801
Edgewater, MD
There we go...

20210121_152035.jpg

20210121_152047.jpg

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
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Edgewater, MD
@Alex W @sail69 @2airishuman Sigh...2air put the fear in me that the bend is so nuts that I'll just keep screwing it up.

I called The Anchorage. The compleat kit is not $500, it's $246 plus another $100 or so for air freight because it's too big to ship any other way. It's steam bent oak and all the fasteners. I folded like a house of cards and ordered the kit.  By the time I buy all the PVC, fittings, fasteners, a million clamps and the lumber, I'll be into it for $200 or so. It's worth another $100 to get the wood properly shaped.

So, no steam box or browsing for wood at Exotic Lumber. :(

The kit is on back order. They've been waiting for their shipment of oak for months and they don't know when it'll arrive but she's certain it'll be well before my trip to Maine.

 

Ishmael

Resting Bitch Face
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Fuctifino
You missed a great learning experience. Steaming white oak is a piece of cake.

I used 1/4" steam-bent laminations glued together with Weldwood plastic resin adhesive to make two 1"X4"X18" diameter half-circles for the end pieces of a sofa table I built. Still holding 40+ years later.

It took about ten minutes to make a steam box out of plywood offcuts and two more to hook up a kettle with a salvaged bonnet hair-dryer hose. Those hoses might be really hard to find these days. 

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
4,354
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Lower Loslobia
You missed a great learning experience. Steaming white oak is a piece of cake.

I used 1/4" steam-bent laminations glued together with Weldwood plastic resin adhesive to make two 1"X4"X18" diameter half-circles for the end pieces of a sofa table I built. Still holding 40+ years later.

It took about ten minutes to make a steam box out of plywood offcuts and two more to hook up a kettle with a salvaged bonnet hair-dryer hose. Those hoses might be really hard to find these days. 
?

Bright-as-a-star-softhood-WINNER-1200px.jpg


 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
66,072
11,022
Great Wet North
Semi, what's good for rot resistance?
I'm not sure what to recommend.  The most rot resistant woods are in two caregories: the ones that are too hard to work, and the ones that are too brittle. Or, like teak, too damned expensive.  

I'll consult my sources. White oak won't rot if kept clean and dry.

https://www.diy-wood-boat.com/Timber.html
Clear fir.

Steams, bends, laminates, pretty good rot resistance, looks good varnished and it's as cheap as any sort of suitable wood.

Someone (Guzzwell?) once said that it was the only wood that an entire boat could be built of.

 

2airishuman

Anarchist
I folded like a house of cards and ordered the kit.  By the time I buy all the PVC, fittings, fasteners, a million clamps and the lumber, I'll be into it for $200 or so. It's worth another $100 to get the wood properly shaped.

So, no steam box or browsing for wood at Exotic Lumber. :(
Unfortunate, but wise.

 

2airishuman

Anarchist
@2airishuman you're saying that the scarf joints will be along the gunwales and not in the curve at the bow? Hmmm, amazing to bend a piece of wood that sharply even with a steam box and not have it explode!
I bent white cedar ribs about 1/4" thick to a radius of about 8" for a canoe project.  It worked out but, how shall we say, the yield was not 100%.  Perhaps my steaming technique was off.  Perhaps I was too slow.  Who knows.

The thicker the wood, the harder it is to bend, of course.  The mechanics are that the outside part of the wood that is in tension more or less stays the same length while the inside part is compressed like a sponge.  So the thicker it is the more compression is necessary given the same radius.  Some species bend better than others, and green wood bends better than air dried bends better than kiln dried.  And any knots or other discontinuities concentrate the force and therefore limit how much you can bend.

Years ago my father brought back from a trip to rural Spain, a traditional pitchfork made of wood.  The bends and branches in the pitchfork were achieved by bending a sapling while it was still alive and allowing several more years growth to accumulate before cutting it.  Though time consuming it is an ideal way to make bent pieces of wood that are strong.

 
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