Dyer Dhow Rehab

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
2,820
2,278
Don't try pirate. Few people can do that. This is the only quality pirate reference I've come across. She was a tender for a pinky schooner. 

Picaroon.jpg

 

gkny

Member
338
25
@gkny  Great tips. I'm pretty sure there isn't any foam under the aft-most seat. I should find a way to fill that void with foam or something. The bleach bottle is a good tip.

Although the Dyer rarely ships water during towing, I thought that the little bow cover would be prudent to have to keep water out. Speaking of towing, do you think the bull nose ring on the bow is sufficiently strong or should I be rigging up some sort of bridle hardware for 2 or 3 points?  I've towed and even hoisted the boat onto the foredeck just by that little ring but that doesn't mean that it's smart to keep doing it.
I have not towed a Dyer at speed with water in it but we regularly tow half-filled dhows that have capsized back to the RC and tow boats in when the wind has gone flat.  Never seen a problem with the existing hardware for the painter.

If you do not have foam under the back seat, I would certainly add it.  When I first got my Dhow, I capsized it trying a tight mark rounding.  It floated so low that I could barely bail the boat.  When boats in the fleet capsize they take forever to bail out.  I found an old piece of dock flotation foam when I rebuilt the dhow.  I am not sure if the rigid foam sheets at box stores are sufficiently closed cell as not to take on too much water.  The piece of thin ply that forms the vertical panel at the front of the aft thwart is a pretty good template to start with.

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,500
2,793
Edgewater, MD
Well,  the good news is the Dyer is buoyant when capsized.

I was able to right it and pump out a lot of water while I was in the water but I doubt I could re-enter without swamping it again.

 

sailman

Super Anarchist
8,290
416
Portsmouth, RI
Well,  the good news is the Dyer is buoyant when capsized.

I was able to right it and pump out a lot of water while I was in the water but I doubt I could re-enter without swamping it again.
If you are looking for a project you could do the double hull conversion that older model Penguins have done.  It turns the boat into a self rescuing model.

 

sailor-cfn

Member
241
67
Well,  the good news is the Dyer is buoyant when capsized.

I was able to right it and pump out a lot of water while I was in the water but I doubt I could re-enter without swamping it again.
Don't try to right it by standing on the CB.  It'll break right off.

 
Yup...first thing I did getting into my new-to-me Dyer was having it scoot out underneath me dockside.  Stepped down in the 4' of water and shot back out onto the dock without even getting my phone wet in my pocket.  

My buddy thought it very funny.

It was...

Been spoiled by those RIBs et al.

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,388
3,029
The dinghy shape is pretty wobbly  with the seats and gunwales removed, so they may tell you to do one side at a time. 
I knew a couple in the VI that had sailed down from the Chesapeake in a nicely restored sloop about 28' or so. They had the smallest Dyer (Midget?) that pretty much took up the whole foredeck on the offshore passages. They lived aboard near me in the harbor and could have been YouTubers these days and were very shipshape in every way. The name of the sloop was STEADY but what I really liked about them was that they named the small dinghy PROBABLY WOBBLY.

 

freewheelin

Anarchist
611
122
WLIS
The Dyer needs a name. The mothership is "Alacrity."  A search for antonyms yielded mostly derogatory words.

What's a good word that sums up relaxed/unhurried or moving at a relaxed pace?
What about Slack? Or Slackrity if you are feeling punchy.

 
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