Dynex Halyard

JeffD

Member
Hi,

I'm using a 4mm Dynex halyard led out of the mast through a Ronstan mini cam-cleat. Now and then at worst possible moment this decides to slip through the teeth of the cleat by a few inches. The teeth on the cams seem OK and the lead angle is perpendicular to the cleat so it should be OK. Its fair to say the halyard is always gripped at the same position, so maybe its wearing a little at this point but again this is not noticable on inspection.

Is this stuff just too damn slippery for a cleat to hang on to reliably? Anyone else had this problem?

Thanks

 
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warbird

Super Anarchist
16,594
1,342
lake michigan
Two or three ideas. Try a different brand cam cleat. Try a new cam cleat, the appearance may be fooling you to believing it is OK when it is really worn just to the point of not gripping well. Move the cleat closer to, or further from the halyard sheave. Shorten (lengthen?) the halyard, these steps intended to get the cam cleat gripping a different section of the line!

 

Wet Spreaders

Super Anarchist
2,496
292
SF Bay
Pull 18" of thin line into the core of the halyard around the point where the cam grips. Thickens up the line and helps cams hold onto it.

 

markvannote

Member
376
25
Newport, RI
When you say your halyard is Dynex are you referring to Dynex Dux? A Dyneema single-braid will rarely hold in a cleat under load. It is too slippery. In the case of a J-24 halyard which is held by a cam cleat on the side of the rig we add cover to the area where the line is cleated at full hoist. Hope this help.

Thanks.

Mark

 

JeffD

Member
Thanks guys, I appreciate you taking the time to make some suggestions. I'll give these ideas a try.

Cheers,

Jeff

 

pickles

Member
308
0
Melbourne
Sounds like you are using straight 4mm dynex with out a cover? Add a cover where it is cleated and it will fix all your issues. It is just too slippery and smooth a surface for the cleat to get a grip on the dynex.

Mark there is dynex. And dynex dux

Dynex is a 12 strand dyneema with a pollyureathan coating made by hampijdan

Dynex dux is a 12 strand dyneema that is heat set and streched only available above 5mm

 

markvannote

Member
376
25
Newport, RI
Pickles,

We actually carry inventory of Dux here in my shop. I am just predisposed up here that everyone who say Dynex is trying to say Dux. It can be quite a buzzword. Wasn't thinking when JeffD originally wrote 4mm though.

Thanks.

Mark

 

JeffD

Member
I should have taken more note when you mentioned Dynex Dux

It is 4mm Dynex 75 - (12 strand I think) from Hampidjan, therefore has no cover as such. As suggested by the vendor I pre-stretched it before use. I was quite amazed how much it crept under initial tension, until at a certain % extension it became tight as a drum and that was it. The masthead setup has a 2:1 purchase on a C-Tech carbon fibre mast, the halyard is then cleated at the step. I have found that this gives about 20mm of stretch once everything is grunted in. So I just pull the sail as far as it will go and the allow for the stretch to give some clearance at the top.

I just need to stop it jumping out of the cleat and order will be restored to the universe!

Thanks,

Jeff

Pickles,

We actually carry inventory of Dux here in my shop. I am just predisposed up here that everyone who say Dynex is trying to say Dux. It can be quite a buzzword. Wasn't thinking when JeffD originally wrote 4mm though.

Thanks.

Mark
 
I just need to stop it jumping out of the cleat and order will be restored to the universe!
Granted inserting some cord into the core at full hoist works to increase diameter, you can try that or how about 6" or so of external cover? if you can pull it back into the core at each end, the cover then becomes the softer sacrificial fibres the cleat bites into & the easy to see full hoist mark in one

 
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Gappy

Member
70
2
first off Ronstan cleats suck they just slip full stop made of plastic you need alloy ones

secondly core into a cleat is not a good idea either. Put a cover on the cleat area or splice a loop into the end and put it onto a hook rack or something like that.

 
another thing to consider is that cam cleats are often not the choice for highly loaded lines. They will rotate slightly so that the line is able to come out no matter what type of line you put in. You might think about changing out to a jammer or if you want to keep the cam cleat, put a second one in-line behind the first

 

Pinner

Member
99
1
Try gently wetsanding the coating off the line where it is cleated. Use a horn cleat and do a few wraps on it before the final cleating. So simple

 

Christian

Super Anarchist
Try gently wetsanding the coating off the line where it is cleated. Use a horn cleat and do a few wraps on it before the final cleating. So simple

That's a pretty srupid solution. The right solution is to add a cover (with proper bury at each end) in the area where the line is cleated. Period. A horncleat will kill Dynex due to tight bends.

 
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Pinner

Member
99
1
I agree with adding the cover when using a cam cleat for a jib halyard b/c you are probably adjusting it throughout the day. That is certainly what I do

On a main halyard you want to go max hoist and make sure it doesn't move. Tons of boats use a horn cleat on the main halyard (5o5, 470, j80 to name a few). When you do a few wraps on a horn cleat you are ensuring that it won't slip.

 

Mysanne Throhppe

Super Anarchist
1,321
0
@Gappy's eye is a good solution if you can do that. See below pic of downhauls. In first picture you can see the eyes spliced into the halyard. The halyard is hauled to the working eye which is hooked into the downhaul and adjusted from there.

2984222094_c21d37c588_z.jpg


2983365893_b3a63d2e18.jpg


 

mojounwin

Anarchist
532
1
Queensland
Any ideas how the Sk75 will go in a lewmar clutch? The clutch will obviously have a bit more bite then a cleat, but still not sure if that will be enough.

Cheers

Mojo

 

Christian

Super Anarchist
Any ideas how the Sk75 will go in a lewmar clutch? The clutch will obviously have a bit more bite then a cleat, but still not sure if that will be enough.

Cheers

Mojo
Fine with a cover. No dice without. Dyneema is extremely slick - a desired property as it means low abrasion - but it also means slippage in clutches without a cover

 

Merit 25

Super Anarchist
2,009
0
VA and MD USA
Heck, even with cover they tend to slip inside the core.

Is lock stitching the best way to prevent this? I just changed out my main halyard to Endurabraid and am very afraid of this.

 

Mike in CT

Anarchist
604
15
CT
does anyone have a link to instructions on how to add a piece of cover to 12 strand line (yale crystalyne I think). my jib halyard (uncovered) is chaffing on the sheave and I thought adding a cover in that spot might help.

 
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