Engine control panel wiring

Sea-lution

New member
47
0
95W 29.5N
Hey GeorgB, to put it bluntly, your idea is terrible.  With parallel wiring you've got the buzzer and/or light, with series wiring you have both or nothing.  Even if you find an LED that can pass enough current to power the buzzer, with components being so cheaply made in China these days, plus corrosion potential, its *really* isn't worth the risk of losing the entire alarm circuit over a diode.  BTW, what is your point of using LEDs??  The lights are only necessary when the engine is on, and power isn't an issue when the alternator is turning.  

The wiring harness on my engine was failing, bloody confusing mess, and the panel shot, and that project made it to the top of The List a few weeks ago.  All those effin' wires ... went to nothing!  Do yourself a favor and ditch the wiring harness when you do the panel.  My wiring diagram didn't show the diodes, I found them when I dissected the wiring harness.  The local Yanmar place didn't know about the diodes either, so I couldn't renew them.  For the time being I spliced each one onto its wire from the sensor, and put a ring terminal on the exit-side, which I connected to a bus bar for each one.

As you know the B2 panel doesn't have gauges, so I made one side of a 10-position (2 x 5) bus bar for the temperature sensor and the other for the oil pressure sensor.  Then I connected the lights and buzzer to their respective bus bar, and there's an extra wire on the temperature bar that goes to the DPDT switch to test the temperature alarm circuit - I don't see that on your diagram, it's the only easy way to test that circuit, you should keep the switch.  Well, renew it.

I used a 20 position (2 x 10) bus bar for + and -.  The + bus bar is powered from the AC (on the start switch), which serves the lights, buzzer, tach gauge, hour meter, and completes the circuit through the DPDT switch turn on the tach gauge light.  The - bus bar serves the start switch, buzzer, lights, and to complete the temperature test circuit; that bar is just connected to a nearby terminal block for the fridge.  Good idea to ditch the key for a push button, my key switch is only six years old and already more corroded than the 15-yo one I replaced!  I use a cable stop to cut the fuel feed, the +/- bus bars have available spaces that can accommodate an electric stop device, however those work.

There might be other stuff I'm missing, or maybe I don't remember the above correctly, it's been several projects ago, can't recall without looking at the panel and thinking about it.  Anyway, it's *real* nice to see all the labeled wires, and super easy (ring terminals) if I ever renew any components or whatever.

Oh, back to the harness, I attached pics - all those wires and only four were necessary!!!  Well, five, but I renewed the starter wires quite a few years ago.  I used AWG 18 (wire, bus bars, terminals and heat shrink leftover from the LED lighting project :))  One wire each from the temperature and oil pressure, and two from the tach.  I discovered that my engine has sending units for oil pressure and temperature gauges, but the B2 panel doesn't have gauges .... someday I'll make a gauge panel, but mount it inside the boat near the chart table.  Just need to run one wire from an available position on the + bus bar to the gauge panel ... easy peasy!

My tach gauge didn't work very often, as you can see in the pics, the POs let the heat exchanger leak on the sensor for who knows how long, so I didn't know if the problem was the harness wires/connectors, or the sensor.  The sensor was quite rusty so I renewed that too, now the gauge always works.

Among other problems my B2 panel also was cracked at the fasteners, the new panel was around $75 - WTF?  It is a piece of injection molded plastic with some knock-outs!!  If I had had the time I would have made a panel out of GPO3 (electrical-insulating), and painted it to match the boat.  

Hope you post a pic of your completed panel!

1 hmm.JPG

2 Medusa.JPG

3 Aaahh.JPG

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Moonduster

Super Anarchist
4,823
231
Dude,

If you're worried about the dangers of a diode failing causing the failure of an idiot light and buzzer, you need to find a new sport.

 
Thanks for all the good tips, ideas and opinions.  I'll post pics when it's done but it might take a while since spring is finally here and i'm going to focus on sailing instead of maintenance ;)

 
Things are finally moving with the panel!

The broken yanmar panel was mounted to port but the replacement is going to fit where it was originally on the boat, to starboard behind the throttle.

It looked like this:

2r5yi5z.jpg


And this is the new control panel taking shape. Buttons from left to right, engine power on, start, stop.

2ynjvph.jpg


 

Alcatraz5768

Super Anarchist
I have bought an engine control module off eBay usually used for generators. Has a digital display that can toggle through info and user preset alarms. It can also have a remote start stop button which will go in the cockpit. i will keep you updated in my thread. 

 

pedro_dawn

New member
1
0
I did panel B rebuild a couple years ago. Left the circuit unchanged, but moved / replaced the lights and buzzer and added fuel guage and hour meter. PM me and I'll send you the details.
Hi WoobaGooba! If only I knew how to PM. I've been looking to create my own panel, but with off the shelf components so i can carry some spares, and harness with thicker cables and bus bars for better serviceability..

I am still scratching my head over:
- the diodes thing, most diagrams I see online does not show the diodes symbols.
- on the same note, if I should add a resistor in place of the charge lamp
- if it would be worth it to add a starter solenoid

Cheers!
 

Quickstep192

Anarchist
908
188
Chesapeake
Here’s mine that I fit from AC/DC. There are no idiot lights, instead there are gauges and buzzers for alerts. I had to add senders for oil and water temp, but I really like being able to see the actual value. IMHO, the idiot lights come on after it’s probably too late.

I also like not having a key; just rocker switches. I reach through the oval holes with a finger for start/stop and there are covers for when not in use.

61CB1FF9-8516-495D-8143-A3E5EB11B423.jpeg
 

MiddayGun

Super Anarchist
1,190
449
Yorkshire
but I really like being able to see the actual value. IMHO, the idiot lights come on after it’s probably too late.

Realistically, how often do you actually look at the gauges, if you're completely honest?
For me the answer is unless I suspect something is wrong, rarely.

The best alarm on mine is the exhaust temp alarm, that thing has alerted me to a blocked inlet a couple of times before engine temps got even close to being too hot.
 

Quickstep192

Anarchist
908
188
Chesapeake
I actually look at mine fairly frequently. I mostly look at oil pressure and water temp. I look when I change speed and glance occasionally during use.

Now you’ve got me wishing I had an exhaust temp alarm. What are you using for a sender/sensor?
 
Last edited:

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
7,089
1,465
worldwide
Hey GeorgB, to put it bluntly, your idea is terrible. With parallel wiring you've got the buzzer and/or light, with series wiring you have both or nothing. Even if you find an LED that can pass enough current to power the buzzer, with components being so cheaply made in China these days, plus corrosion potential, its *really* isn't worth the risk of losing the entire alarm circuit over a diode. BTW, what is your point of using LEDs?? The lights are only necessary when the engine is on, and power isn't an issue when the alternator is turning.

The wiring harness on my engine was failing, bloody confusing mess, and the panel shot, and that project made it to the top of The List a few weeks ago. All those effin' wires ... went to nothing! Do yourself a favor and ditch the wiring harness when you do the panel. My wiring diagram didn't show the diodes, I found them when I dissected the wiring harness. The local Yanmar place didn't know about the diodes either, so I couldn't renew them. For the time being I spliced each one onto its wire from the sensor, and put a ring terminal on the exit-side, which I connected to a bus bar for each one.

As you know the B2 panel doesn't have gauges, so I made one side of a 10-position (2 x 5) bus bar for the temperature sensor and the other for the oil pressure sensor. Then I connected the lights and buzzer to their respective bus bar, and there's an extra wire on the temperature bar that goes to the DPDT switch to test the temperature alarm circuit - I don't see that on your diagram, it's the only easy way to test that circuit, you should keep the switch. Well, renew it.

I used a 20 position (2 x 10) bus bar for + and -. The + bus bar is powered from the AC (on the start switch), which serves the lights, buzzer, tach gauge, hour meter, and completes the circuit through the DPDT switch turn on the tach gauge light. The - bus bar serves the start switch, buzzer, lights, and to complete the temperature test circuit; that bar is just connected to a nearby terminal block for the fridge. Good idea to ditch the key for a push button, my key switch is only six years old and already more corroded than the 15-yo one I replaced! I use a cable stop to cut the fuel feed, the +/- bus bars have available spaces that can accommodate an electric stop device, however those work.

There might be other stuff I'm missing, or maybe I don't remember the above correctly, it's been several projects ago, can't recall without looking at the panel and thinking about it. Anyway, it's *real* nice to see all the labeled wires, and super easy (ring terminals) if I ever renew any components or whatever.

Oh, back to the harness, I attached pics - all those wires and only four were necessary!!! Well, five, but I renewed the starter wires quite a few years ago. I used AWG 18 (wire, bus bars, terminals and heat shrink leftover from the LED lighting project :)) One wire each from the temperature and oil pressure, and two from the tach. I discovered that my engine has sending units for oil pressure and temperature gauges, but the B2 panel doesn't have gauges .... someday I'll make a gauge panel, but mount it inside the boat near the chart table. Just need to run one wire from an available position on the + bus bar to the gauge panel ... easy peasy!

My tach gauge didn't work very often, as you can see in the pics, the POs let the heat exchanger leak on the sensor for who knows how long, so I didn't know if the problem was the harness wires/connectors, or the sensor. The sensor was quite rusty so I renewed that too, now the gauge always works.

Among other problems my B2 panel also was cracked at the fasteners, the new panel was around $75 - WTF? It is a piece of injection molded plastic with some knock-outs!! If I had had the time I would have made a panel out of GPO3 (electrical-insulating), and painted it to match the boat.

Hope you post a pic of your completed panel!

View attachment 237722

View attachment 237723

View attachment 237724
I despise electrical connections located on the engine block..if you rewire get rid of that plug nonsense and locate the junctions inside of a junction box …located someplace dry, cool and convenient for troubleshooting
 

harrygee

Member
391
121
Tasmania
I'm probably a bit late to respond to a post from 2017 but your original post hints that you misunderstand the function of the diodes in the Yanmar panel.

The diodes are one-way valves / non-return valves so current will only flow one way.

Each of the lights and the buzzer have a positive 12 v going to one terminal, switched by the key switch.

In the event of a temperature or oil pressure switch closing, it will earth the other terminal of your light and the light will activate.

The buzzer will also activate, via the appropriate diode.

You can connect all of your temperature switches and pressure switches to the buzzer without diodes and any one of the alarms will get your attention and a glance at your gauges will probably tell you where to look. All the lights will also light, if you still have them.

I like to rig a car horn via a relay instead of the buzzer, which is pretty anaemic when the engine is running.

The charge light, if you have one, should be left as it is.

If you don't have an exhaust temperature alarm, it's easy enough to rig a button switch of the type used in clothes dryers, column heaters etc, eBay has plenty in a range of temperatures, they're cheap. I use exhaust webbing and hose clamps to fit them and, if there's a nuisance alarm, go for a higher temperature switch.
 




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