ePropulsion Pod Drive

Bull City

Bull City
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North Carolina

Beanie 101

Member
64
36
UK
The new items will take a while to arrive and in some cases a long while.  I suspect that some of them will be in high demand.  For example, the next shipment to the UK may not be until March and German distributors mention April for items in the Katalog.  A 12V power take-off adapter has been on the cards for several monthe and may not arrive until even later.  I think that the folding prop may be the same.

 
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Bull City

Bull City
6,848
2,501
North Carolina
The new items will take a while to arrive and in some cases a long while.  I suspect that some of them will be in high demand.  For example, the next shipment to the UK may not be until March and German distributors mention April for items in the Katalog.  A 12V power take-off adapter has been on the cards for several monthe and may not arrive until even later.  I think that the folding prop may be the same.
I mentioned this to my dealer, and they confirmed that there are new products, but were sworn to secrecy. What does a "12V power take-off adapter" do? Allow you to run a 12V system off a 48V battery?

I was also wondering about running the eProp pod drive, which is 48V with a 24V battery. Could it be done? Are there draw backs? The reason I ask is that Torqeedo makes a 24V LI battery with 3500 Wh, which would fit nicely in my storage bin. It would provide ample range. Also, I have a Torqeedo remote throttle.

 

TwoLegged

Super Anarchist
5,665
2,081
I was also wondering about running the eProp pod drive, which is 48V with a 24V battery. Could it be done? Are there draw backs? The reason I ask is that Torqeedo makes a 24V LI battery with 3500 Wh, which would fit nicely in my storage bin. It would provide ample range. Also, I have a Torqeedo remote throttle.
I'd have thought that you need two 24V batteries to drive a 48V motor.

Also, I think that unless you have a lot of expertise, it's safer to buy the whole package from one manufacturer.  That way, any failures land on them.

 

TwoLegged

Super Anarchist
5,665
2,081
Personally, I think that you'd want to develop a lot of expertise, on this and any other critical systems, before you did much more than day sailing.
Bull sails on a lake.  Probably not much scope for more than daysailing.

 

allweather

Member
392
76
baltic
running the eProp pod drive, which is 48V with a 24V battery. Could it be done? Are there draw backs?
Probably not. The motor could be run on 24V. Kind of.(wrong constructions, likely to burn out due to high current) But the electric controller will not start it.
Have you considered a non torqeedo/Epropulsion battery? 48V are a bit rarer(though serial connections are supported by some 24V batteries) but do exist in various measurements that would fit the drawer.

 

Beanie 101

Member
64
36
UK
I mentioned this to my dealer, and they confirmed that there are new products, but were sworn to secrecy. What does a "12V power take-off adapter" do? Allow you to run a 12V system off a 48V battery?

I was also wondering about running the eProp pod drive, which is 48V with a 24V battery. Could it be done? Are there draw backs? The reason I ask is that Torqeedo makes a 24V LI battery with 3500 Wh, which would fit nicely in my storage bin. It would provide ample range. Also, I have a Torqeedo remote throttle.
Bull,

Given that the official catalogue/catalog/Katalog with all the new developments is now available on the web, there’s not much scope for secrecy any more!

Yes, the power take-off adapter or DC/DC converter is for using the 48V battery to do other useful stuff like pumping up an inflatable dinghy with a 12V pump.  A UK distributor has even suggested that with hydro-generation and the DC/DC converter, the eProp battery could be used to recharge a boat’s 12V battery.  See https://forums.ybw.com/index.php?threads/epropulsion-spirit-1-evo-hydrogenerator-in-ym.557173/post-7511576

I agree with the others - you’re better off sticking with one supplier for complicated systems like this.  I’ve taken a loss by selling a whole load of Torqeedo gear on eBay to partially finance my purchase of an eProp.  It was worth it!

 
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Diarmuid

Super Anarchist
3,364
1,369
Laramie, WY, USA
I mentioned this to my dealer, and they confirmed that there are new products, but were sworn to secrecy. What does a "12V power take-off adapter" do? Allow you to run a 12V system off a 48V battery?

I was also wondering about running the eProp pod drive, which is 48V with a 24V battery. Could it be done? Are there draw backs? The reason I ask is that Torqeedo makes a 24V LI battery with 3500 Wh, which would fit nicely in my storage bin. It would provide ample range. Also, I have a Torqeedo remote throttle.
DC-to-DC converters do exist, and they are sometimes used in renewable energy systems to reconcile generating sources of different output voltages; also trucking, as some vehicles have both 12VDC and 24VDC onboard systems and losses there don't count for much. Efficiencies are so-so,  finding one large enuf would be tricky, they are expensive, and they produce substantial waste heat.

Probably the Torqueedo battery cells are wired in series, so you can't just re-jumper internally to double your voltage. We could do that on our home bank, as it was originally 48VDC output, which we cut in half for twin 24V banks in parallel. My guess on the "12V power take-off" is just that, they tap the battery bank at the 12V junction and wire a cigarette lighter socket there. Not best practice, but the alternative is to tap all four quarters of the 48V bank and parallel them to a 12V output, which seems like it might confuse the BMS?

 
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Bull City

Bull City
6,848
2,501
North Carolina
Another thing. Should I get the Top or Side Mount Remote Control? I'm inclined to go with the Top Mount, but would be interested opinions.

The Top Mount is very similar to what I have for my Torqeedo. I have a secure place to stow it at the aft end of the cockpit, and could easily route the cable. It can be cable or wireless, but I would use the cable. Cost is $300

The Side Mount is like a regular inboard throttle. The display is separate. I'm not sure where I'd put the display. Cost is $450

Top Mount:

https://www.epropulsion.com/product-page/navy-remote-control

image.png

Side Mount:

https://www.epropulsion.com/product-page/side-mount-control

image.png

 

DDW

Super Anarchist
6,239
972
I'd do the side mount, looks more like it belongs in a sailboat. 

The 12V tap is almost surely a DC-DC converter with limited output. These are very cheap to build in low current outputs. Tapping the cells would lead to serious balancing issues. A DC-DC up converter to get you from 24 -> 48 V can be done, but in the very high currents you need it would be expensive. They are about 90% efficient. 48V batteries exist from other vendors, not sure they are much cheaper than the eProp.

 

weightless

Super Anarchist
5,607
581
Probably the Torqueedo battery cells are wired in series, so you can't just re-jumper internally to double your voltage.
S-P matrix of 18650s. Spot welded connections. The whole mess is embedded in urethane. Of course, the cells can be rearranged into different battery configurations but it's a project. 

 

Crash

Super Anarchist
4,938
919
SoCal
True, but I can’t think of where to put the display. 
How often to you need to "access/see/use" the display while actually motoring?  At start up, to confirm everything is nominal (like with a diesel?) then mostly not look at it while maneuvering and motoring, then again, at shut down?   If that's all, then it doesn't need to be instantly at hand nor in your "immediate" line of sight, which should expand the options.  Send some pics of the cockpit around where you would mount the throttle/shift lever, and where your current instuments (if any) are mounted.  I'm sure the brain trust here will come up with a range of good ideas

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
8,877
4,789
Canada
Do the controls have identical IP ratings?

I'd put the display anywhere in the cockpit. You don't have to look at it steadily; just probably tells you consumption/remaining battery power or range.  Just on the fwd end of the cockpit?

 
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