"Equity".....The dumbing down of 'Murica

Burning Man

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The last paragraph in red is the most important and something I've been saying for years here.

Virginia Eliminates Accelerated Math Courses Because Equity

The Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) is eliminating accelerated math courses before 11th grade to “mprove equity in mathematics learning opportunities.”

Loudoun County school board member Ian Serotkin announced Tuesday that the “Virginia Mathematics Pathways Initiative (VMPI),” is a “a sweeping initiative by the Virginia Department of Education to revamp the K-12 math curriculum statewide over the next few years” by “eliminat[ing] ALL math acceleration prior to 11th grade.”

“That is not an exaggeration, nor does there appear to be any discretion in how local districts implement this” Serotkin wrote. “All 6th graders will take Foundational Concepts 6. All 7th graders will take Foundational Concepts 7. All 10th graders will take Essential Concepts 10. Only in 11th and 12th grade is there any opportunity for choice in higher math courses.” 

The VDOE website says that in addition to improving equity, the change will “[e]mpower students to be active participants in a quantitative world.” 

However, a Loudon parent told Fox News Thursday that the initiative would actually “lower standards for all students in the name of equity.”

“These changes will have a profound impact on students who excel in STEM-related curriculum, weakening our country’s ability to compete in a global marketplace for years to come,” the parent said.

VDOE spokesperson Charles Pyle told Fox News the VMPI would “support increased differentiated learning opportunities within a heterogeneous learning environment.” 

Delegate candidate for Virginia’s 50th House District, Mike Allers, told The Federalist that VDOE “didn’t level the playing field —they destroyed it.” 

Oftentimes initiatives, like one created by the Virginia Department of Education, are pitched as a way of giving black and brown students a necessary leg up, but Allers said barring students from taking accelerated courses will have the opposite effect.

“This decision from the VDOE stunts natural growth, choice, and progression for students, and is incredibly belittling, arrogant, and racist in assuming that children of color cannot reach advanced classes in math,” he told The Federalist. 

“The racial achievement gap in schools will never be closed if higher opportunities are not provided for all students, while at the same time pushing common core and mediocrity,” Allers continued. “As long as Common Core and curriculum like it is pushed, civics isn’t taught at younger ages, and economic concepts aren’t introduced earlier, REAL actual non-political equity will not be achieved.”

“We need real solutions, such as investment in Pre-K , tackling discrepancies at the source and early, making sure there are more opportunities available — that is how you make education equitable,” he said. “If you are not solving the problem at the root, it’s window dressing.”  

https://thefederalist.com/2021/04/23/virginia-eliminates-accelerated-math-courses-because-equity/

 

AJ Oliver

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What a bogus source. 

No wonder you put up such bizarre posts 

  • Overall, we rate The Federalist Questionable and far-Right Biased based on story selection and editorial positions that always favor the right and promotion of propaganda, conspiracy theories, and numerous failed fact checks.
 

Rain Man

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This debate has been raging in the education community for years.  In my high school, we ultimately discouraged accelerated classes, and went instead with integrated curriculum classes (eg. Biology/English).  

The key issue with accelerated classes is that they extract the top students from the other classes.  The regular classes lose their peer role models for both math learning and often work ethic.  That makes those classes more difficult to teach.   I would commonly create seating plans that deliberately placing weaker students between stronger students.  The stronger students benefit too (see one, do one, teach one).

A good teacher can find ways to stimulate stronger students in a regular classroom, but really the solution is self-paced learning.  Toward the end of my 25 years of teaching I was getting better at this, and had converted all my IT and Robotics classes to self-paced.  Eventually I would have done this in Physics too.  

Are accelerated classes needed?  Not really, if the teacher is good.  

 
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Ease the sheet.

ease the sheet
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This debate has been raging in the education community for years.  In my high school, we ultimately discouraged accelerated classes, and went instead with integrated curriculum classes (eg. Biology/English).  

The key issue with accelerated classes is that they extract the top students from the other classes.  The regular classes lose their peer role models for both math learning and often work ethic.  That makes those classes more difficult to teach.   I would commonly create seating plans that deliberately placing weaker students between stronger students.  The stronger students benefit too (see one, do one, teach one).

A good teacher can find ways to stimulate stronger students in a regular classroom, but really the solution is self-paced learning.  Toward the end of my 25 years of teaching I was getting better at this, and had converted all my IT and Robotics classes to self-paced.  Eventually I would have done this in Physics too.  

Are accelerated classes needed?  Not really, if the teacher is good.  
But, but white kids are being disadvantaged!

 

Rain Man

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But, but white kids are being disadvantaged!
I sort of thought that the accelerated classes were more about parents egos than the kids' learning.  Parents would sign up kids for these classes who had no business being there.  

Going deeper into the curriculum is a better choice than going faster, IMHO.

 

ShortForBob

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This debate has been raging in the education community for years.  In my high school, we ultimately discouraged accelerated classes, and went instead with integrated curriculum classes (eg. Biology/English).  

The key issue with accelerated classes is that they extract the top students from the other classes.  The regular classes lose their peer role models for both math learning and often work ethic.  That makes those classes more difficult to teach.   I would commonly create seating plans that deliberately placing weaker students between stronger students.  The stronger students benefit too (see one, do one, teach one).

A good teacher can find ways to stimulate stronger students in a regular classroom, but really the solution is self-paced learning.  Toward the end of my 25 years of teaching I was getting better at this, and had converted all my IT and Robotics classes to self-paced.  Eventually I would have done this in Physics too.  

Are accelerated classes needed?  Not really, if the teacher is good.  
Years ago we went the other way. 

You had to pass maths to get your "leaving certificate" end of year 10 age 16.. 

They were doing horrible things like quadratic trinomial equations by then and trigonometry . Ugh.

So, in recognition that some kids are somewhat Maths challenged even though they were perfectly competent or even brilliant in other subjects, they introduced a "practical maths' subject for those struggling . Calculate percentages, averages etc. Useful life stuff. I passed that :D

 

Rain Man

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Years ago we went the other way. 

You had to pass maths to get your "leaving certificate" end of year 10 age 16.. 

They were doing horrible things like quadratic trinomial equations by then and trigonometry . Ugh.

So, in recognition that some kids are somewhat Maths challenged even though they were perfectly competent or even brilliant in other subjects, they introduced a "practical maths' subject for those struggling . Calculate percentages, averages etc. Useful life stuff. I passed that :D
I think most of the world's education systems have realized that factoring trinomials and the quadratic equation are not useful things to learn unless pursuing a career in science or engineering, and have courses in math that people should actually know for real life.  The real battle is to get parents to let go of the idea that their kids are going down those career paths.  If you are giving your math teacher the finger in grade 8, you probably aren't going to be a nuclear physicist.

My favorite example in grade 9 math was showing kids how to calculate how much they were actually paying for their "free" cellphone through higher monthly rates compared to "bring your own device" cellphone plans.

 
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ShortForBob

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I think most of the world's education systems have realized that factoring trinomials and the quadratic equation are not useful things to learn unless pursuing a career in science or engineering, and have courses in math that people should actually know for real life.  The real battle is to get parents to let go of the idea that their kids are going down those career paths.  If you are giving your math teacher the finger in grade 8, you probably aren't going to be a nuclear physicist.
Heh, we had one or two of those. One became a very good criminal Lawyer..

after a stint in Turana age 15.

so some obviously see the light after 6 months of harsh treatment and abuse. But Jeff was exceptionally intelligent.

 

Fah Kiew Tu

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Heh, we had one or two of those. One became a very good criminal Lawyer..

after a stint in Turana age 15.

so some obviously see the light after 6 months of harsh treatment and abuse. But Jeff was exceptionally intelligent.
Some of us never got caught.

My school, year 12, almost as many ended up attending Long Bay as university. Most did neither of course, but I've always found that amusing.

FKT

 

ShortForBob

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Some of us never got caught.

My school, year 12, almost as many ended up attending Long Bay as university. Most did neither of course, but I've always found that amusing.

FKT
You had criminal year 12 students in the early 1970's?

White collar criminals I assume?

(most kids that could make year 12 (or HSC) were too busy studying while looking after younger sibs, cooking dinner for working parents etc to get into serious mischief)

The "troubled" ones had already been weeded out end of year 10, even in state high schools

 

Raz'r

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My kids college doesn’t accept High School AP classes for credit. If that was common, there’d be a lot less demand for those classes in HS.

 

AJ Oliver

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"practical maths' subject for those struggling . Calculate percentages, averages etc. Useful life stuff. I passed that :D
As @Rain Man above sorta suggests, they should also teach personal finance: interest rates, Rule of 72, inflation, compounding, poverty stats for their own communities, and a whole host of predatory financial scams from loans on car titles, rent to own, reverse mortgagees, payday loans, tax preparer scams, for-profit universities, and college loans. 

The Wall Street financial engineers sneeringly refer to the US young folks and working poor as "low hanging fruit" and steal from them totally without mercy. 

And some of ya wonder why I am a democratic socialist. 

 
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SloopJonB

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The key issue with accelerated classes is that they extract the top students from the other classes.  The regular classes lose their peer role models for both math learning and often work ethic.  That makes those classes more difficult to teach.
Removing the smart kids turns the class into Sweathogs?

 

Olsonist

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“We need real solutions, such as investment in Pre-K , tackling discrepancies at the source and early, making sure there are more opportunities available — that is how you make education equitable,” he said. “If you are not solving the problem at the root, it’s window dressing.”  
The Federalist. What whiny garbage. You're not going to introduce Abelian group theory in pre-K. In fact, what is your great pre-K study plan? I would suggest mud. What sez you?

The state needs to provide a good education for everyone and equity is a concern. Parents need to provide a good education for their children. These are not the same thing and are often at odds. So outcomes will be different. Rich parents can afford great schools and even private tutors for academics and sports. We have great equalizers such as junior colleges. I had a wrong side of the tracks JC transfer buddy at Cal. Arrest record wrong side of the tracks. JC-Cal->Columbia grad school. He's a hedge fund manager in NY now.  Ritchie Rich gets a head start but we have multiple avenues for equalization. And for re-invention; bankruptcy is no different from lighting out for the territory.

Max chillage on the right wing SoCon whining.

 
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Olsonist

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His criminal background and proclivities were good preparation for that. (sorry, could not resist) 

One thing to say about the US is that (at one time anyway), people can get second chances. 

such as me. 
The difference is that you realize and more importantly, appreciate that fact. The United States of America really should be renamed the United States of Second Chances. What the fuck are immigrants anyways? Jeff's right wing SoCon nonsense is just a Marlboro ad.

Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"


 
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phillysailor

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I disagree with presenting this decision to remove all advanced courses as striving for “equity.”

“Equity” could be better achieved by presenting appropriate material to students rather than giving them all the same material.

It seems this change is being made to make education standardized and homogeneous. Probably a cost-cutting motive paired with use of the word “equity” as packaging verbiage to try to win a supportive parent group. 

 
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