Fiberglass repair recommendation.

Pinching

Anarchist
609
18
There are many.

Have heard good things about Muller Marine in eastport (no connection) esp for boats under 33 feet. His hoist cannot handle bigger boats I don't think.

 

Trendsetter

Super Anarchist
1,855
0
Cape Cod
Let me start by saying I love muller good guy and does great bottom jobs, however I wouldn't let him touch a boat that needs structural repairs!! They may look ok for a few months but I have never seen one if his jobs hold up worth a shit.

Sadly if you want great glass work in Annapolis you have slim pickins'. If it's a. Insurance job go back down to Deale and let the boys at osprey do it or go up to Baltimore for the boys at tidewater.

Annaplois is full of a lot of guys who work from the back of there truck. Your results may very with them. I know a guy named fenelly (sp?). Drives a red dodge truck does great work but ya can't pay him until the job is done other wise you will have to go find him at Davis and hope he is sober enough to finish your job

 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,281
Edgewater, MD
Memo-

There is a dead transducer under my v-berth, directly on the "V" of the hull. The fucking PO bedded it with JB Weld or Qwiksteel. Now, it's slowly leaking.

I'm not confident in my ability to recreate the shape of the hull there. If it were on the flat part of the hull, I'd jump right on it. Sure, I could fill in the hole, but it would look like shit and not be fair with the rest of the hull.

 
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4ktsb

Super Anarchist
If it is easy to get to the transducer inside the V berth, you might really want to try this yourself. It's obviously way to cool out right now, but that just gives you a little more time to plan your attack. A quick google came up with these instructions which I used to replace a pretty big ripped out cleat (albeit above the water line. Still, it wasn't nearly as difficult as I expected.

http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/fiberglass-repair.asp

This had some interesting tidbits too: (Details on the hull construction)

http://books.google.com/books?id=jUYzDQaiZhUC&pg=PA58&lpg=PA58&dq=Is+Pearson+a+cored+hull?&source=bl&ots=Eusrr44Gou&sig=1vuwrwJ278jIO2_9rbsK9u5FJtw&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8WbAUvPJCozJsQTNrIGIDg&ved=0CEsQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=Is%20Pearson%20a%20cored%20hull%3F&f=false

 
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Bugsy

Super Anarchist
2,548
852
Canada
Ajax,

I read once somewhere on SA something like "if you follow good advice for any repair, the worst outcome is you may disappoint yourself".

I say describe your problem, provide some pictures, and eventually someone will give you excellent advice on how to make the repair.

You can probably do as good of a job yourself (hey, it is *your* boat) as anyone else.

Go for it!

 

Memopad

Super Anarchist
1,712
0
Marquette, MI
Memo-

There is a dead transducer under my v-berth, directly on the "V" of the hull. The fucking PO bedded it with JB Weld or Qwiksteel. Now, it's slowly leaking.

I'm not confident in my ability to recreate the shape of the hull there. If it were on the flat part of the hull, I'd jump right on it. Sure, I could fill in the hole, but it would look like shit and not be fair with the rest of the hull.
I dunno man I think you'd be surprised what you can do ;) I'm guessing your limitation out there would be yard time vs. your free time. Would be pretty simple to layer some glass over the hole and build it up. Once your glass is in place, mix up some fairing compound in your epoxy and goop it on to match it to the rest of the hull, sand, repeat. The hole you're patching should only be like 3 inches right?

Ajax,

I read once somewhere on SA something like "if you follow good advice for any repair, the worst outcome is you may disappoint yourself".

I say describe your problem, provide some pictures, and eventually someone will give you excellent advice on how to make the repair.

You can probably do as good of a job yourself (hey, it is *your* boat) as anyone else.

Go for it!
Unless you're paying out top dollar for your super-maxi repairs, I'm convinced you can do as good as most boat yards yourself. Especially for a job like this. Only limits are your free time!

 

MW4506

New member
15
1
Save your money for more difficult tasks - this should be an easy fix. In the V-Berth, use a Dremel tool and grind out some of the crap the PO used to install. Take your time and grind it out carefully, not cutting into the transducer. Then mix up a slurry of West System Epoxy and a microfiber additive (to thicken it up), and mini-trowel it around the transducer, and it will harden up, seal properly, and be just fine.

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,676
1,082
Ajax, I agree, this is not difficult. You can easily do it, if you have the time.

Pop out the old transducer one way or the other.

Grind the inside of the hole at a 1:12 taper. Make sure you have all clean glass, and rag out all the dust.

Tape something smooth, that will conform to the hull shape, over the outside of the hole - some people use milk jug plastic, some people just use a couple layers of duck tape. Just make sure it will not sag when the resin heats up.

You can use simple polyester resin for this. Vinylester and epoxy will give you extra properties but you don't really need them.

Put a layer of chop strand mat in first. Let it cook off and remove the plastic/tape from the outside.

Then build up with alternating cloth and mat, progressively bigger to fill the taper. Note: by the way, if the laminate is really thick, some 'experts' epoxy a round precured plug (glass or simply filled epoxy) into the hole to let you do the job with fewer layers of laminating.

Let cure.

The one area I disagree with don Casey (in the link above) is for below waterline repairs I think you should bond to both sides rather than just the inside side of the hull, just for safety.

So, now grind back a taper on the outside and laminate in 1 layer of mat, 1 layer of cloth and then a finish layer of mat (you can do more depending on what is necessary to slightly overfill the taper you ground out, but that's probably enough)

That repair should be a pretty close fit to the hull if you got the outside plastic conforming nicely and did a clean smooth job on the outside laminates. But you can now build it up with either something like marinetex or chopped mat and then shape it with a grinder and sander to make it 'a perfect invisible fit'.

You could do it in an afternoon. . . .two afternoons would be better to let stuff cure.

 
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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,281
Edgewater, MD
Ok. Which one of you geniuses is going to come help me un-fuck it, when I start screwing it up and ask for help?

 

estarzinger

Super Anarchist
7,676
1,082
You know I am happy to . . . just call

I specialize in project management, sitting in a chair with a beer in my hand :)

But, I have actually gotten my hands dirty and done this job a time or two.

It would help if you had a fiberglass roller

I hate grinding fiberglass . . .I will leave that to you.

I have been cutting, drilling and tapping aluminum all weekend .

bench.JPG

 
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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,281
Edgewater, MD
I would seriously be fine with an experienced person guiding and correcting me while I do all of the work. After doing it once, I'll be ok.

 




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