Florence

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,283
Edgewater, MD
you'd think houses in strom prone zones would have roll down metal shutters for the windows, sure save having to store all that plywood, taking it down / up ..   maybe something the ins companies would cut you a break on..
It's common in Florida. Well...some are roll down and some are more like large, flat metal shades that get lowered when a storm comes. The further north along the east coast you go, the less common shutters are, because the frequency of hurricane hits decreases but nearly the entire east coast is a target area. Everything from Irma hitting Florida to Sandy hitting New Jersey, New York and even causing damage and deaths in Ontario and Quebec.

 
Some of the newer high end construction does have metal roll down shutters. I've seem some in south Florida that have mounts for storm shutters to be easily mounted in the event they are needed and then removed and stored so as not to spoil the architecture.
Yes, they may have drilled the holes to hang the shutters, but they are far from easy to hang when the pressure is on to get them done, especially second story shutters.

- Stumbling

 

Innocent Bystander

Super Anarchist
11,749
757
Lower Southern MD
Issue with fitted or permanent storm shutters is cost and not much of an insurance deduction for installing them. As discussed, high end in areas prone to regular storms are the permanently installed roll down shutters.  Prefitted with helicoils for mounting studs are pretty common in Florida new construction to current codes.  My daughter and SIL in Tampa have those on their place.  Challenge is storing the shutters until needed and knowing when to install them as the house becomes a dark fortress once they are installed.  Of course, they do nothing for surge, upstream flooding.

NC gets an average of one hurricane every 2 years and "major" hurricanes a lot less frequently.   Hard to justify the 15K plus for retrofitting roll downs or even the lower cost for stock panels based on the specific risk and the fact that insurance covers wind damage (subject to deductibles, of course).  I think a lot of commercial places board up more to limit inventory damage from wind/water getting in if a window is broken as well as a deterrent to looters helping themselves due to broken windows.  

When I was a kid on the Florida east coast, you boarded up "picture windows" with ply if you expected a direct hit.  As I recall, our biggest problems were downed trees, water intrusion and flooding rather than wind damage to the house, at least up to Cat 2.   

 

Not for nothing

Super Anarchist
3,587
844
jupiter
Flo 2 

two_atl_5d0.png


 

LarryE

Anarchist
664
29
Florida
 I believe most single family new construction, at least in this county, require storm shutters.

The real sad thing is those effected people, in NC, will be effected for months, maybe years. The president will do the photo op at the next disaster, the TV cameras will be gone and they will be left to deal will all the aftermath. 

Lived through it after Andrew.

 

jerseyguy

Super Anarchist
Commander Bonespurs to New Bern resident with someone else's boat in his backyard: “At least you got a nice boat out of the deal.” 
If that person is not a MAGA type he ought to get an estimate to remove the boat from his property, repair whatever Damage to his property it might have caused, and then get an estimate to repair the  boat so that it is in sailable condition.  Then post the cost  on social media somewhere.

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,205
2,847
North Carolina
In what is perhaps a final coda to Florence in my neighborhood.... my upstairs AC was not cooling properly for the last three nights. I thought it might have had something to do with the thermostat programming, but I decided it must be something else, since it began after the heavy rains of Sunday -> Monday. Today I inspected the outdoor compressor to see if a dead hog or chicken had screwed things up. Turned out that a large twig had fallen on the compressor, and had slipped between the guard bars and positioned  itself so as to stop the fan from turning. Removed twig; problem solved. What are the chances of that happening?  

 

Max Rockatansky

DILLIGAF?
4,031
1,099
you'd think houses in strom prone zones would have roll down metal shutters for the windows, sure save having to store all that plywood, taking it down / up ..   maybe something the ins companies would cut you a break on..
You can, they’re called storm shutters, but fugly and absolutely would not have worked with my house. 

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
14,126
3,670
After the last major storm Ivan (14 years ago!) here on the Alabama coast, we had these panels installed. Got a break from the insurance company and they are fairly quick to install with the clip and wingnuts they use. I made a tool to chuck into my cordless drill that spins the wingnuts on much faster. Only put them up once since and then only on the East and South exposure.

clear-polycarbonate-hurricane-storm-panels-florida.jpg


Ivan was no laughing matter between Fort Morgan and Pensacola. We were just about 3 miles west of ground zero.

Here are the clips for those Lexan corrugated panels.

3799088_orig.jpg


You can buy the same extrusion in galv steel for cheaper but the light that the lexan makes it much less depressing being inside if you opt to stay.

Another lexan product that I used on my Dad's condo right on the beach in Gulf Shores. 

poly-4.jpg


 

Foreverslow

Super Anarchist
you'd think houses in strom prone zones would have roll down metal shutters for the windows, sure save having to store all that plywood, taking it down / up ..   maybe something the ins companies would cut you a break on..
May start to see more of them in the future.

Got an update to my homeowners insurance Friday. This is from Metropolitan.

New named storm wind damage deductible.

Besides the normal deductible, if the damage is due to a named storm, there is an additional $7k deductible  in force.

first they shirked water damage.

Now they are starting to dodge wind claims.

So protecting your glass may save you from making a claim they are to try and skip out on.

 

Innocent Bystander

Super Anarchist
11,749
757
Lower Southern MD
May start to see more of them in the future.

Got an update to my homeowners insurance Friday. This is from Metropolitan.

New named storm wind damage deductible.

Besides the normal deductible, if the damage is due to a named storm, there is an additional $7k deductible  in force.

first they shirked water damage.

Now they are starting to dodge wind claims.

So protecting your glass may save you from making a claim they are to try and skip out on.
Insurance is a lot more than a dollar value and a premium. I’m surprised that Virginia is just getting around to named storm deductibles unless It’s just Metro that’s adding it well after the State allowed them. Check with other companies.  In Maryland, most have a hurricane deductible tied to being in a hurricane warning zone within 24 hours. Named storm is a bit risky when the weather pattern from a hurricane is several hundred miles wide. Different companies apply them differently. USAA, for example does not apply a hurricane deductible but withdrew from offering insurance in Florida to anyone but active duty under orders. 

Really important to read and understand your policy.  In Maryland, hurricane deductibles were slipped into policies after Isobel.  When Irene hit, a lot of folks discovered that their coverage had changed and they now had massive deductibles (several percent of total insured value).  

 


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