flying in pro Race Officers

JMOD

Super Anarchist
1,193
108
Netherlands
Hi all, 

starting to organise a world cup. the club involved is knowledgeable, But we want to make sure sailing is top notch. therefor we are thinking of getting a commercial, professional race committee/officer on board with the help of the local club, so they can also learn something or strengthen their skills.

Who knows good european race officers who might be interested in a set up like this?

thanks in advance!

 

sunseeker

Super Anarchist
3,586
549
Hi all, 

starting to organise a world cup. the club involved is knowledgeable, But we want to make sure sailing is top notch. therefor we are thinking of getting a commercial, professional race committee/officer on board with the help of the local club, so they can also learn something or strengthen their skills.

Who knows good european race officers who might be interested in a set up like this?

thanks in advance!
I love it when someone decides the locals aren’t good enough to run a regatta, so they fly in the pro from Dover.

That’s exactly when I take my volunteer services and apply them where others work for the betterment of the sport, and don’t expect a paycheck.

Running a race is not rocket surgery, and flying in judges and race officers makes it a business, not a recreational sport.

 

Murphness

Super Anarchist
1,148
74
Boston
Anderson Reggio or his dad Peter are probably some of the best in the biz.

Bill Canfield puts on a good regatta.

If you want to put on a world class regatta, look who other world class regatta chairs have used. Melges, J-Boats, TP52, etc...

 
I love it when someone decides the locals aren’t good enough to run a regatta, so they fly in the pro from Dover.

That’s exactly when I take my volunteer services and apply them where others work for the betterment of the sport, and don’t expect a paycheck.

Running a race is not rocket surgery, and flying in judges and race officers makes it a business, not a recreational sport.
TO be fair....some people really suck at running regattas and an outside perspective might do them so good. 

 

LB 15

Cunt
I love it when someone decides the locals aren’t good enough to run a regatta, so they fly in the pro from Dover.

That’s exactly when I take my volunteer services and apply them where others work for the betterment of the sport, and don’t expect a paycheck.

Running a race is not rocket surgery, and flying in judges and race officers makes it a business, not a recreational sport.
You know one thing I found out working along side Pro's on a race course as a volunteer is how much I learnt. You should try it some time instead of taking offence that the RO have recognized that it can be done better by hiring a Pro. 

If that doesn't work apply this liberally to the affected area.

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Just A Skosh

Super Anarchist
1,386
65
New Hampshire
TO be fair....some people really suck at running regattas and an outside perspective might do them so good. 
At the J/80 East Coast Champs last year the RC decided to start a race in under 5 knots, and abandoned on the last leg.  Not a big deal, right?  Except that they were planning on abandoning BEFORE they even started.

 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
16,900
1,586
South Coast, UK
Running a race is not rocket surgery, and flying in judges and race officers makes it a business, not a recreational sport.
Running a major international regatta is a business. Clubs do it for the revenue and sailors who are expending a lot of  holiday time and money to attend expect a professional-quality  event.  The vast majority of the team running such events remain unpaid club volunteers and I've found it an interesting viewpoint to be a small cog in such a team. It is not the same as running the club's weekend racing or even a national championship.

 
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Presuming Ed

Super Anarchist
11,031
192
London, UK
Eurosaf run the race official exchange program in Europe. http://www.eurosaf.org/

Common for the RYA to fly in the Chief Umpire (Call sign "Chump") for things like the UK Match Racing national finals. Plenty of qualified IUs here, but an outsider has the advantage of greater impartiality - justice being seen to be done, and all that.

 
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sunseeker

Super Anarchist
3,586
549
Running a major international regatta is a business. Clubs do it for the revenue and sailors who are expending a lot of  holiday time and money to attend expect a professional-quality  event.  The vast majority of the team running such events remain unpaid club volunteers and I've found it an interesting viewpoint to be a small cog in such a team. It is not the same as running the club's weekend racing or even a national championship.
If it’s a business, then pay everyone who works on the event.

 

dogwatch

Super Anarchist
16,900
1,586
South Coast, UK
^

No. It's raising money for the club, there's no reason for club volunteers to be paid. It is normal around here for club members to have to contribute a few days a year to help run club activities. Some clubs allow you to pay an additional membership fee if you don't want to do that. 

 
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Brass

Super Anarchist
2,759
171
Eurosaf run the race official exchange program in Europe. http://www.eurosaf.org/

Common for the RYA to fly in the Chief Umpire (Call sign "Chump") for things like the UK Match Racing national finals. Plenty of qualified IUs here, but an outsider has the advantage of greater impartiality - justice being seen to be done, and all that.
One or more  'foreigner' IJs or IUs are required to constitute an International Jury or a Grade 1 MR Umpire team.

 

Rum Runner

Rum Runner
5,305
312
Illinois
My vote is for Mark Foster. He ran the J70 worlds last year and has done many other regattas in the US and other countries. 

 
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Svanen

Super Anarchist
1,036
292
Whitby
starting to organise a world cup. the club involved is knowledgeable, But we want to make sure sailing is top notch. therefor we are thinking of getting a commercial, professional race committee/officer on board with the help of the local club, so they can also learn something or strengthen their skills.
If you consult the club’s ROs and they support this approach, it could work out very well.

But it should be a real consultation: soliciting and acting upon their collective input. If you just pay lip service to wanting their opinions, and actually have your mind already made up which direction you’re going, you can expect frustration, disengagement, and general lack of commitment.

At the end of the day they are volunteers. Disrespecting their expertise will yield many future problems that will long outlast the specific Regatta.

It goes almost without saying that if the club decides to hire a professional RO it should ensure that the local ROs have full opportunity to be involved in deputy positions. If not, no genuine learning can occur.

 
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