Flying Tiger

SURGE

New member
23
1
I believe they still race OD in Cali, and the last hull #118 was delivered in August of 2015 as far as I know.

 

SURGE

New member
23
1
I wish it would have taken off it’s a great boat! I did ask Tom at Flying Tiger Boats about what a new build costs these days (about 90k to get it to the US) if I remember right. I was just wondering when I was looking into buying one. I have hull #26 currently.

 
LIFTING THE KEEL ON A FT10

i have the FT10 in Auckland NZ. She lives in a Marian berth and I don't think the keel has been lifted since she was launched in 2010.

I have what looks like a Tripod arrangement that has never been used.

Does anyone in FT10 world have any photos or diagrams of how the Tripod arrangement is fitted and set up on the boat?

Thanks

RTT

 

Team Subterfuge

Anarchist
730
21
San Diego
LIFTING THE KEEL ON A FT10

i have the FT10 in Auckland NZ. She lives in a Marian berth and I don't think the keel has been lifted since she was launched in 2010.

I have what looks like a Tripod arrangement that has never been used.

Does anyone in FT10 world have any photos or diagrams of how the Tripod arrangement is fitted and set up on the boat?

Thanks

RTT
Since no one else has chimed in with a response and photo, I'll give it a try.  Sorry, I do not have any photos.

1.  Remove both vang blocks near the mast on the cabin top.

2.  There are two rods - approximately 3/4" in diameter - with the tri-pod/Bi-pod.  Attach the rods with pins at the locations where the vang blocks  were previously removed .

3.  The Bi-pod has slots cut in each foot.  Slide the slot in the Bi-pod feet on the port and starboard chain plates.  As I recall there is only one way the bi-pod fits and the Bi-pod should be angle toward the stern.

4.  Attach the other end of the rods, described above, to the B-i-pod.  The Bi-pod should now be rigid and stable.

5.  Attach chain hoist to shackle on Bi-pod.

6.  The rest should be obvious.

Note:  Do not raise the keel more than necessary.  It is possible to have the keel bulb against the hull and still have room between the top of the keel and Bi-pod.  (Which makes it mechanically possible to try and pull the keel bulb up through the bottom of the boat.)  Once raised, the keel can move about in the trunk - fore, aft, and side to side. I would recommend having some foam or other packing to wedge the keel in place.  Otherwise, the keel is like a clapper in a bell and can swing about.

 

DSE

Member
183
3
Keel hoist2.JPG Keel hoist.JPG

 
Thanks Subterfuge for the write-up and DSE for the pics.

All is clear now.

I got the Bi-Pod thing and the rods when I took over the boat but did get a chain block. So  next weeks job when everyone is back at work is to go and buy a chain block.

RTT

 

DSE

Member
183
3
This is what I'm using. I think it's 2 ton. I think the previous owner replaced the chain loop used for hoisting with SS and shortened to 2-3 feet (0.7-1.0 m) so that it doesn't snag on the cabin top. It's kind of awkward to use when hoisting and not very efficient, but does work. I thought about going to a ratcheting type, but wouldn't know which one to go with or if it would work any better.

image.png

 
Splash

Someone more techy than I will chime in and provide you a link to that piece of sordid history.

I recall those days (somewhat) fondly.  Some were very productive, others just plain crazy

The low point - the weeks of discussing the shape of the cabin windows

The high point - when the group decided to bite the bullet and upgrade to carbon mast, boom, sprit.  No better decision could have been made.  Would have been a totally different boat without them.

Only regret - we didn't discuss any potential upgrade to the carbon rudder/tiller that ultimately took about 50 lbs off the butt end.  Maybe tried the "drop-sleeve" approach to the engine door.

Even though I no longer own MHK I thoroughly enjoyed my ten years with her and know that one could not have found more boat for the money at those entry level costs.  Light, fast, easy to sail, strong enough to thrash offshore if you like.

Cheers

Phillip

 
Hi Philip,

I remember reading some pages of that thread back then. At the time I owned a similar boat like the FT10, (a Cork 1720) and I did not see how the FT10 could turn out much better than that. I have since seen the yacht in person and now I am curious about the crowdsourcing yacht design process and the interaction with Bob Perry. I also read all the 144 pages of the Sliver thread (the 60 ft by 10 ft double ender yacht, also by Bob). I hope indeed that someone could give me a link or a hint to what the name of that thread was!

Splashtest

 
Last edited by a moderator:

Christian

Super Anarchist
Hi Philip,

I remember reading some pages of that thread back then. At the time I owned a similar boat like the FT10, (a Cork 1720) and I did not see how the FT10 could turn out much better than that. I have since seen the yacht in person and now I am curious about the crowdsourcing yacht design process and the interaction with Bob Perry. I also read all the 144 pages of the Sliver thread (the 60 ft by 10 ft double ender yacht, also by Bob). I hope indeed that someone could give me a link or a hint to what the name of that thread was!

Splashtest
A 1720 and FT 10 in the same sentence ?????????????????  Sure they both are boats and float but they are so far apart in most aspects it is not even funny.  What have you been huffing?

 
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