Food, fixes and notes from the casual coastal sailor.

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
I feel sorry for people that sail year-round. They don't get the exhilaration of that first stiff wind sail when you wonder what holds it all up. That's the real shakedown sail. You can see which turnbuckles need tightening and other bits that need adjustment in the 20-knot gusts.
IMG_4253.jpeg


That was at the end of 4 days of much-needed time on the water. Plus you finally get to enjoy the rewards of projects you took on over the past off-season.

Thanks to the Dyneema thread here, the Dyneema main halyard on the reel winch is a great upgrade. Firstly, gone is the springy tendency of the last few turns of wire to jump off the reel and jam. The Dyneema lays on the reel right to the last inch. Evans knot works like a charm. I even hoisted my daughter on it in the bosuns chair to the spreaders (a mis-lead lazy jack). I told her to keep her eye on Evans knot,... as my son backed her up with the spinnaker halyard on a regular winch and cleat. I almost forgot the reason to switch was to stop chewing the varnish off the spruce spar! It's very easy on the hand in comparison.

The LED spreader lights light the boat up like a stage. I'd be embarrassed to go on deck they're so bright but good to have if you need to. And the LED mast top anchor light works great and I couldn't drain off even 10% of my small house bank firing my usual gizmos.

The ice box! I put just 3, 10-pound blocks in on Friday morning. The box was only half full for the 4 days. By Monday afternoon when we got off, we still had enough of the blocks to go another day. That's great in our experience and should be even better when we fully load the box with the normal 50-60 pounds and usual week provision supply. Plus the yoga mat over the 3 doors is easy to use and likely helps.

The composting toilet, so far, has exceeded my expectations. But I won't review it until I've gone through the entire process. But I will say that my wife - who was a somewhat reluctant proponent - can't stop raving about it.

2 adults, 4 days, we've given it some use. It's super easy, there's nothing to clean (outside of an occasional spray with a simple mix of water and a bit of bio dish soap). It works! We just kept walking into the head and enjoying the smell of fresh clean sea air.

There is no boat head smell so far, none. A first for us. But more about the composting head later in the season.

OGO 1.jpg


Clear sailing (and not sailing), now. We spent one night anchored in Pulpit.

IMG_4228.jpeg
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
The neighborhood millennials went sailing instead of playing video games on their phones all weekend. When we left the harbor Friday afternoon, kids were stepping the mast on a Hunter 25 with no crane or A frame. Just muscle. Nice to watch.

My daughter took a couple on her $1 sailboat; an old friend and her boyfriend. They went overnight into the islands and had a grand time.

Our son and boat partner took 3 more for an overnight as well on their new (to them) 5k Vanguard. They are still sorting things out on that boat and haven't paid much attention to sailing systems, nor do they have a mount for the inflatable OB, so they tow a rubber brick.

The 26' $1 sailboat showed them it's stern. That must have hurt.

FullSizeRender (6).jpeg
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
There was almost one more, but we decided on Long Cove off Tenants after much discussion as we slowly sailed up from rounding the corner at Old Man Ledge.
It turned out to be a mobo flotilla from a Boothbay club. 35 in all. It was good to know because I have never seen that many boats in this anchorage.

A nice group, they had a lobster support boat with 100 lobsters onboard that put a shoreside lobster bake on. We anchored near one that thankfully only ran the generator for a few hours a day. We're one of the two last sailboats to the left, way down.

The flotilla pulled up anchor at about 11 and headed for Seal Bay.

IMG_4310.jpeg
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
My daughter can't get enough time on her $1 sailboat. She grew up on the water but having her own boat is all new. She's understandably nervous about docking and texted me to see if I could meet her at the dock. Like all sailboats, this one is tricky to maneuver, more so because of the outboard you have to control with the tiller and the ancient underbody with keel and attached rudder in the middle of the boat, a heavy little boat at that.

She was well prepared and did a good job with the exception that she set up for starboard side to (standard with our southerly winds), and didn't notice it was coming out of the North.

There's little to no stop in the reverse on the OB. No matter, she had the whole dock for me to stop along, and stayed well clear of bowsprit on the schooner.

Any tips on operating this type of OB in a lazarette, old boat?
IMG_4302.jpeg


She's really into sailing her own boat! Amazing time this is, a few finger moves and this pops up in the 'family' message group:

Screenshot 2022-07-10 at 14.56.53.jpeg
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
SWEET GALE has been evicted, again. I found her a nice dry shed in town at a wooden boat builder 3 years ago.

People get old though, and he's sold his business. She had to go.

IMG_4323.jpeg


It's been 30 years since she last floated (the 1992 registration sticker).

Her days of hiding in the dark are over. I've scheduled a launch for next week.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,176
2,193
We finally launched Monday morning at high tide, and were on our mooring in NE Harbor a couple of hours later.

Just chilling out for a week or so in a harbor that is unusually quiet for this time of year. Fewer lobster pots than normal in some places. With fuel at $6/ gallon, bait twice as high as last year, and a landed price of about $4/lb, lobstermen are working for nearly nothing.

We were late launching because I did the Newport Bermuda race with a friend, then flew home to FL to batten down the house before making the 1600 mile drive to Maine over two long days just before July 4. Then a week with the boat still in the shed re-sealing deckhouse windows plus other jobs best done under cover. Then launch and head off.

I spent most of yesterday sleeping for what seemed like the first time in
almost a month.

A beautiful day in Maine today reminds me of why we still do this.

Keeping my eyes open for Christmas, Restive, and others in the area this
summer.

Life could be worse…
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
We finally launched Monday morning at high tide, and were on our mooring in NE Harbor a couple of hours later.

Just chilling out for a week or so in a harbor that is unusually quiet for this time of year. Fewer lobster pots than normal in some places. With fuel at $6/ gallon, bait twice as high as last year, and a landed price of about $4/lb, lobstermen are working for nearly nothing.

We were late launching because I did the Newport Bermuda race with a friend, then flew home to FL to batten down the house before making the 1600 mile drive to Maine over two long days just before July 4. Then a week with the boat still in the shed re-sealing deckhouse windows plus other jobs best done under cover. Then launch and head off.

I spent most of yesterday sleeping for what seemed like the first time in
almost a month.

A beautiful day in Maine today reminds me of why we still do this.

Keeping my eyes open for Christmas, Restive, and others in the area this
summer.

Life could be worse…
Maine 'commodities' are out of whack. We paid $9/lb for 15 lobsters from a family run (husband fishes, wife runs a lobster 'store') last week, and paid $12/ pound for steamer clams. I can only guess that supply is up while demand, purely driven by summer tourism, is behind. If the fishermen only stalled setting their traps in the spring, they might turn this unpredictable market to their advantage.

Good to hear you're back in NEH. It is a glorious time of the year to be on the coast of Maine. All around me are lush greens and cool blues to compliment the warm days and cool nights. It seems everyone I know is on and off the water right now.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
Every season, before the last boats are launched, the first accidents limp in for repairs. There's no rest for the weary boatyard workers,...

1657799298558.png


 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,176
2,193
Every season, before the last boats are launched, the first accidents limp in for repairs. There's no rest for the weary boatyard workers,...

View attachment 528489 "

"The boat will be fine"? I don't think so. Two engines running just before the boat was totally submerged. Everything except the hull and deck is a write-off: two engines, electronics, all electrical components, every piece of soft goods.
 

ProaSailor

dreaming my life away...
6,105
790
Oregon
Every season, before the last boats are launched, the first accidents limp in for repairs. There's no rest for the weary boatyard workers,...

View attachment 528489


But Camden Harbor has its treacherous rocks, some visible at high tide, some not. As the Bandwagon traveled toward the Inner Ledges, the captain slipped to the wrong side of Nun No. 6, and slammed into a sharp edge of underwater granite. The force of the impact ripped a large hole in the fiberglass hull.
[...]
“She was only under water for 20 minutes,” he said, adding that the boat should be fine.
IMG_3977.jpeg

 
Last edited:

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
“She was only under water for 20 minutes,” he said, adding that the boat should be fine."

The boat will be fine, once several large piles of money have disappeared into the boatyard.
That was my thought. The harbormaster has seen many boats dragged, underwater, into the travel lift at Lyman Morse (previously Wayfarer Marine).

The sopping seaweed covered boat then goes into one of the big sheds.

An insurance adjuster comes in next.

Finally, the boat comes back out in a month - or a few, or (sometimes), a year later, and it looks better than new.

Back in the water it goes.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,063
2,613
The Schooner KOUKLA waiting for spars I suppose.

IMG_4332.jpeg


SPIRIT the Brownell Bass boat I care for sporting her new coatings and bimini. SPIRIT taught my clients that they need more boat if they want to take the whole extended family out.

IMG_4330.jpeg


So we have a 40' Nimbus T11 arriving in a couple of weeks. Never a dull moment.
 




Top