Food, fixes and notes from the casual coastal sailor.

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,282
Edgewater, MD
It doesn't take long for ten foot-itis to set in with new-to-boating owners.
Well, I bought my Coronado 25 knowing that it was a training boat that I would only keep until I had a handle on sailing. It was cheap, tough, simple and forgiving. It didn't go to windward very well at all.

I intended my Pearson 30 to be my final boat. My wife, not I, decided that it lacked sufficient storage and amenities. She chose the Tartan 33. She is still happy with it so I'm still happy with it. Unless we win some kind of lottery, this is the last boat.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
That was my thought. The harbormaster has seen many boats dragged, underwater, into the travel lift at Lyman Morse (previously Wayfarer Marine).

The sopping seaweed covered boat then goes into one of the big sheds.

An insurance adjuster comes in next.

Finally, the boat comes back out in a month - or a few, or (sometimes), a year later, and it looks better than new.

Back in the water it goes.
Anything can be fixed. The question is economic feasibility. The two main engines and generator have been underwater.

The mains might be saved if they were not running when the boat went under, but what type of warranty might they get? What happens when you go to sell the boat?

The boat probably has 2x600+ hp, at about $120k each plus r&r. About $20k for the generator

The generator engine might be salvageable, but who wants anything electrical or electronic that has been immersed in salt water? Every inch of wiring, every pump and motor, every bit of electronics, all furnishings: replace.

Depending how how Sabre does their interiors, wood components are probably salvageable.

They said there is a big hole in the hull, presumably all under the waterline. How much interior might have to be removed to get to that to repair it properly?

Yes, it may be rationally salvageable, but there are a lot of caveats here. The insurance company may want to cut their losses.

One thing you can be sure of is that if LM does the work, it will be done properly. Alternatively, they may truck it back to Sabre, which may be more willing to give a warranty on the work.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,289
2,929
Steamed maine lobster is like a package from Amazon. By the time you get to whatever it is that is in there, you’re surrounded by the packing.

Lobster, like life, is best enjoyed, ‘neat’.

Either lightly warmed in a skillet of hot butter, or chilled and tossed with fresh chopped celery, onion and a small dollop of mayonnaise.

Lastly, you should choose a suitable dining setting.

My favorite dining room is an hour and a half
93631A96-D26D-4183-814A-F92D907D6481.jpeg
beam reach from home.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
Steamed maine lobster is like a package from Amazon. By the time you get to whatever it is that is in there, you’re surrounded by the packing.

Lobster, like life, is best enjoyed, ‘neat’.

Either lightly warmed in a skillet of hot butter, or chilled and tossed with fresh chopped celery, onion and a small dollop of mayonnaise.

Lastly, you should choose a suitable dining setting.

My favorite dining room is an hour and a half View attachment 528803 beam reach from home.
The next time I see you in Pulpit, I’m coming over for lunch or dinner. I’ll bring a cold NZ Sauvignon blanc.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
The Schooner KOUKLA waiting for spars I suppose.

View attachment 528628

SPIRIT the Brownell Bass boat I care for sporting her new coatings and bimini. SPIRIT taught my clients that they need more boat if they want to take the whole extended family out.

View attachment 528629

So we have a 40' Nimbus T11 arriving in a couple of weeks. Never a dull moment.
I assume the Nimbus is for your clients, not for you. For just a moment, I thought the world had shifted on its axis.

The Nimbus concept is similar to the smaller Axopar friends of mine have in Bermuda. A larger Axopar—probably a 37 cruiser model— has visited NE Harbor several times in recent years when we’ve been there.

Boats of this type are useful for day cruises and week ending because they can cover a lot of water in a short period of time. They are also surprisingly good in rough water if you keep the speed fairly high.

You do need to be immune to the price of fuel.

It’s a long, long way from the Brownell bass boat, in both time and space. I suppose you now have to find a home for that one, unless you are keeping it yourself.
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
We splashed, moved from FL; what is staying is safely ensconced in storage, and I am now in the process of loading 10lbs of stuff into a 5lb boat. So far it all seems to fit somehow and we're not down on our lines... yet. At the same time we got some varnishing, last minute installs...among other things. We hope to be out and about after the Boothbay Classics. Good news is the solar, not yet fully installed, seems to keep up with the fridge and our modest electronics suite.

One tranche of many.
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accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
We splashed, moved from FL; what is staying is safely ensconced in storage, and I am now in the process of loading 10lbs of stuff into a 5lb boat. So far it all seems to fit somehow and we're not down on our lines... yet. At the same time we got some varnishing, last minute installs...among other things. We hope to be out and about after the Boothbay Classics. Good news is the solar, not yet fully installed, seems to keep up with the fridge and our modest electronics suite.

One tranche of many.
AM-JKLUzeh4tOhn2dwbA437i-qy-H2vQdSDNX7MWd5qlPec8eiKBB9upi4XpYJDqb1pcZN7bSCr7n6IO7BRgq7od6sEG-oCQw_Rp5mFNXd7dQo1QT7m6gk5VAt-B515Y_8wUiyfXnYY-d1jOFQdgF8-1vSbvBw=w1896-h1422-no
Just remember where you put it all, and stow it so that the things you need most regularly are easiest to reach. (I realize this is an inherently impossible task)

Remember also that on your boat, every 1500 pounds or so of stuff Is an inch of sink. (This from the guy who built a boat with a lightship draft of 6’ 6” and an actual departure draft of just under 7’.)
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
Just remember where you put it all, and stow it so that the things you need most regularly are easiest to reach. (I realize this is an inherently impossible task)

Remember also that on your boat, every 1500 pounds or so of stuff Is an inch of sink. (This from the guy who built a boat with a lightship draft of 6’ 6” and an actual departure draft of just under 7’.)
Thanks. Great points.

According to a sistership's ORC Cert, we sink 1mm every 21.42kg, so we only get about 1,200lbs/inch. We've tried to be mindful of weight, but I won't know the final answer until I fill the water tanks.

It's been quite a challenge to meet the competing requirements of ease of access, getting the heavy stuff lower and in the center and fitting into whatever strange shape the storage location came in. Luckily there were squarish lockers next to the mast for the tools and spares. The PO twice removed converted the pilot berths to storage for fluffier things. I had a struggle to find a place for my 7.5' oars, so I attached them to the salon ceiling rather than store them on deck.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
We took so much weight off the boat before Bermuda that the speedo didn't work, came out of the water on every wave. Boat never sailed so sweet.
Setting up a boat for racing vs cruising is a big exercise. My “race” boat this year was a friend’s big Oyster. It was measured virtually empty a few years ago—per ORR requirements—but is a serious cruising boat.

Over several weeks, we probably removed several thousand pounds of unnecessary stuff that was not aboard for measurement.

The cruising sailboat I built was obviously going to be a lot heavier than the designed loaded weight, so I designed and sized the rig for the “real” sailing weight.

Where and how you load the tons of stuff you need for extended cruising makes a huge impact on both comfort and performance.

Stan Honey’s Cal 40 may be the best example I’ve seen of how to set up a dual purpose boat for both racing and cruising. The boat was measured in light racing trim, and all the heavy cruising gear, such as windlass, heavy anchors and chain, heavy saloon table, is installed in a manner that it can easily be removed for racing.

On our racing boats, the drill at the start of every season was to go over every removable item aboard, and ask “do we need this for our racing this year?”

If the answer was “no”, off it came.
We do the opposite on our cruising boats.

The payoff has been if we need a spare, we have the spare.
 

Cruisin Loser

Super Anarchist
Steamed maine lobster is like a package from Amazon. By the time you get to whatever it is that is in there, you’re surrounded by the packing.

Lobster, like life, is best enjoyed, ‘neat’.

Either lightly warmed in a skillet of hot butter, or chilled and tossed with fresh chopped celery, onion and a small dollop of mayonnaise.

Lastly, you should choose a suitable dining setting.

My favorite dining room is an hour and a half View attachment 528803 beam reach from home.
3B316D1E-2A56-45C9-A0BA-44CF3B38523D.jpeg
 
One thing I wish I had done in the beginning was to make a simple paper inventory with locations. Nice blank book just like the log book. In the beginning everything is fresh and it seems like yet another chore that is a pita that can be deleted. We had visions of all sorts of totes organized with lables etc and it never happened. I only had very clear mental pictures of multiple things I knew I had on board but had no idea where I put them. You do get the X-mass effect after buying something for some ridiculous price to find the one you already had a month later.
 

Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,999
3,282
Edgewater, MD
I tried totes but they're designed for Dirt People who live in rectangular homes. They don't conform to curved lockers and storage cubbies.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,549
2,551
I tried totes but they're designed for Dirt People who live in rectangular homes. They don't conform to curved lockers and storage cubbies.
My wife used soft heavy rip-stop vinyl zipper-top bags for under-settee storage. These are nominally rectangular, but they are soft enough to conform to the hull curvature.

You see these used throughout the developing world for all kinds of storage. They are roughly (from memory) about 16x16x 24+ inches. The ones she had are white, but we've seen them in plaids, etc.

They even had a clear plastic pocket on top for labels. She actually still has one at home, 20 years later.

I would check places like Bed, Bath & Beyond, or Amazon.
 




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