Food, fixes and notes from the casual coastal sailor.

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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The last time this boat sailed, my daughter was 1 year old. The cotton sails have been bagged since 1991. Except for a frozen barrel bolt (lashing instead), the sails went on in short order. Cotton, 40 years old and still in great shape, who knew? Still, I waited for this 5-knot wind, morning.

No motor, no oarlocks for the sweeps, we had to sail it out to windward.

IMG_4707.jpeg


MJ and I fell in love with the little boat a few yards off the dock when it was able to point up and clear the moored boats ahead.

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Sweet little sailer.

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
2,881
1,632
coastal NC
The last time this boat sailed, my daughter was 1 year old. The cotton sails have been bagged since 1991. Except for a frozen barrel bolt (lashing instead), the sails went on in short order. Cotton, 40 years old and still in great shape, who knew? Still, I waited for this 5-knot wind, morning.

No motor, no oarlocks for the sweeps, we had to sail it out to windward.

View attachment 538531

MJ and I fell in love with the little boat a few yards off the dock when it was able to point up and clear the moored boats ahead.

View attachment 538533

Sweet little sailer.


Great little vid! And I hear the chearp chearp of an osprey in the background. I'm expecting ours to leave in the next week for Colombia or Venezuela for the winter.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,189
2,199
Sometimes, cruising seasons come to an abrupt halt in unforeseen and unfortunate ways.

Thus endeth this season.

On the plus side, we are safe and healthy, and the boat is on a mooring at the yard awaiting haul out Tuesday morning. We are on the boat for a few
more days, eating down the tuna and scallops in the freezer, things that would otherwise end up in the trash due to the curtailed season and no practical way to take them back to FL.

The boat did not get here under her own power, unfortunately.

On the downside, we have 1500 pounds of useless cast iron in the bilge that was formerly the main engine.

The cost of the new one will be about $60,000.

Sort of puts a crimp in our boat budget.

It’s all a long story for another day. Right now, I think I’ll have another glass of wine. Or two…
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
Thus endeth this season.

On the plus side, we are safe and healthy, and the boat is on a mooring at the yard awaiting haul out Tuesday morning.

The boat did not get here under her own power, unfortunately.
It’s all a long story for another day. Right now, I think I’ll have another glass of wine. Or two…
Very sorry to hear this. Glad to hear you and the boat are safe and sound.

It’s little solace but you will have a wonderful weekend weather wise to end the season.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,067
2,615
Sometimes, cruising seasons come to an abrupt halt in unforeseen and unfortunate ways.

Thus endeth this season.

On the plus side, we are safe and healthy, and the boat is on a mooring at the yard awaiting haul out Tuesday morning. We are on the boat for a few
more days, eating down the tuna and scallops in the freezer, things that would otherwise end up in the trash due to the curtailed season and no practical way to take them back to FL.

The boat did not get here under her own power, unfortunately.

On the downside, we have 1500 pounds of useless cast iron in the bilge that was formerly the main engine.

The cost of the new one will be about $60,000.

Sort of puts a crimp in our boat budget.

It’s all a long story for another day. Right now, I think I’ll have another glass of wine. Or two…
Very sorry to hear this.

A few more shots of SWEET GALE

These sails were made in Camden in the 80's at Gambell and Hunter. At that point they were not putting logos on.

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Selfie with a framed view and level horizon. I didn't know my phone could do this. Watch out now!

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I was explaining the inclinometer to my daughter. Plus we talked about how the originator of this design TEAK LADY, sailed this little boat through the Pacific during WW2. Now that would have been a YOUTUBE sailing channel, I would have watched.

IMG_9003.jpeg
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
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2,199
For this
Very sorry to hear this. Glad to hear you and the boat are safe and sound.

It’s little solace but you will have a wonderful weekend weather wise to end the season
Very sorry to hear this. Glad to hear you and the boat are safe and sound.

It’s little solace but you will have a wonderful weekend weather wise to end the season.
it’s part of the risk we assume as boaters. Think of it like the carbon rig on your sailboat falling down, and destroying your new sails in the process. Unfortunately, insurors are generally smart enough to exclude engine failures.
 

Kris Cringle

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All the kids piled into their boats last night and headed out in the bay. The $1 boat is starkly different under my daughter's ownership. I met her at the docks. She keeps it cleaned and picked up. Between the boys years and her care they have pretty much solved the leaks from above. The sink works (salt water) and she uses this little stool both to do dishes and cook. The Yeti knock off works great in the quarter berth cut-out her boyfriend made. Fresh water in a captive holder above the sink works a trick.

The smartest thing they did was nixed that quarter and give Tony (her adopted dog) the port quarter, so overnight guests are out.
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Despite changing both filters, endless bleeding (I even tried myself), the boys 3ym30 Yanmar refuses to run (anyone have an idea on this?).

That didn't change their Labor Day weekend plans: Tom and Harry with two friends, sailed out of Rockport Harbor, to windward, as they have always done (in smaller boats). Perhaps one day they will own a 50'er with no engine.

Both boats headed out in a stiff Southerly that they fell off a bit on, outside the harbor and close reached to the Fox Islands for the night.

The 33' Vanguard smoked the 26' Outlaw, but they weren't too far off when my daughter took this shot in the Thoroughfare as the sun was setting: Mentally applying 10 mins. @ PHRF, hmmm,...

Today they're headed to Stonington and the Merchants Islands.

68385374126__288843F0-3E3B-49C4-AF55-6B50DAC8D9D2.jpeg
 

Elegua

Generalissimo
it’s part of the risk we assume as boaters. Think of it like the carbon rig on your sailboat falling down, and destroying your new sails in the process. Unfortunately, insurors are generally smart enough to exclude engine failures.
Very true. My insurer will pay, but I have to sink the boat first. Potentially self-defeating.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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True! Even if you only sink it enough to submerge the engine, you’re good to go if you have enough coverage.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
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2,199
Just FYI- @Elegua is crossing the Gulf of Maine right now, singlehanded. He's 1/4 to 1/3 of the way across.
The wind is a beam or broad reach for him. Think pleasant and supportive thoughts.
I believe he is headed to the Chesapeake. Not sure what if any intermediate stops. Taking advantage of favorable winds.

When the weather says “yes”, you say “go”.

What is his boat name for tracking purposes?
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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September is the best sailing on our coast. More consistent wind I believe.

The holiday 3-day weekend was my perfect forecast: 5-10, 5-10, 5-10. Little difference to me the first two were South and the last, North.

I took a leisurely leave and left Saturday at lunch time, then sailed Northeasterly for several hours. I anchored off a small uninhabited island, thinking for the night. I thought better of it after I felt the swell, so pushed on to better protected Butter Island. That was a first (Butter) for me, very pretty and well protected:

IMG_4772.jpeg



But this post is about sailing. As I'm anchored, alone except for one other distant boat, I was amazed at the remoteness even there, way up the bay far from the open ocean.

I got up and 3am and went up on deck. Except for a distant aura of soft light over Belfast, the night sky was incredible. I live in a village and don't see the real night sky except out here. It's breathtaking on a clear night.

The other amazing thing I realized was that I was sailing vicariously with the kid on their boats, that had left the day before. Always late starters,...they were just getting into the Merchant Islands East of Eastern Penobscot Bay. I'd been following their adventure; 6 millennials (they dropped off 2 at the ferry), and one dog, for the past 24 hours via the family message group.

Photos, screen shots of tracks on Navionics, weather reports, as spotty signals came and went.

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Sailing in and out of harbors, sailing along the way, even sailing on and off moorings, it was inspirational for me as I tend to get set in my own ways. They really love sailing, just sailing!

My son has been especially helpful in taking care of his sister on the $1 boat and her boyfriend who is new to this world. But she (and the boyfriend), is coming into her own and is the most enthusiastic of the young tribe out there.

This is Harry(furling main), Toms's since boyhood friend and boat partner in the (now) engineless Vanguard(both their girlfriends had to work this weekend). They know the $1 boat well after 5 years of ownership(before that, they sailed an even smaller boat).

IMG_9281.jpeg


Add to this, my wife left Friday and is in the UK for a much waited oil painting class. Odd that I would be out here alone and yet have a tether to loved ones, miles - and thousands of miles - away.

This is an amazing time. And you can shut it off anytime you want and pick it up later.

So we formed a plan to rendevous out on Eastern Penbay, they coming from the Merchant Islands, me coming from the Northern bay, all on a S, 5-10 forecast.

Everybody sailed, not by design but because we all wanted to. Naturally, that nixed a rendevous, at least under sail.

MJ and crew on the $1 boat tacked through the Merchant Islands. Her boyfriend was so enthralled, he wants to do just that, again.

The boys on the engineless Vanguard decided to sail outside of the Merchant islands, closer to Isle Au Haut to ensure better wind. The Vanguard with the soft bottom inflatable and outboard (always soft, it leaks air,...), adding a lot of drag (I think, but it's their tow boat), needs windpower.

Me, I sailed like a ping pong ball from Deer Isle to Northhaven for several tacks. I knew I was ahead so I enjoyed the extra time. It's such a relief to sail through the lobster pots. I must have hit a hundred this weekend. I stopped even looking for them, my boats underbody, even with the centerboard down nearly 8' (old style 45 degrees or so), just runs them over.

It was a good sail, despite being becalmed twice(loop on track; I cleaned the decks).

I discovered a new destination on Deer Isle (and I look forward to returning) tacking in close. You don't get that under power going in straight lines.

IMG_4832.jpeg


We all met up in Perry Creek. The kids limped in an hour or two behind me. We pooled provisions and MJ cooked up a nice dish in Xmas galley, which she knows well. We compared sails, island anchorages, etc. But we also had some bragging to do with the proof of tracks on Navionics. Phones were thrust in your face, as routes were shown.

Ok, I had the biggest brag,...:) I had sailed through the thoroughfare dog leg - east to west - on a South wind. Yep. I've never made it before (Eastward is easy), came close once but snagged a sheet on a winch at the last moment (I'll never forget it).

They were impressed,... 'WHOA DAD' (some patronizing too, we're owed that).

I had no intention but between all the sailing data the kids had been texting me, pretty good conditions, something in me said, 'leave the engine off today, we can do this'.

I want to do this just once, I told myself.

So during the bragfest, I zoomed in on the little screen in the darkening cockpit and showed them my route through the sticky wicket we all know very well.

I have some local knowledge now of these sailing waters. I tacked deep into shallow bays keeping up good speed, knowing full well how much water I have from anchoring and exploring. And I had a near high tide, still rising just in case. In fact, I never saw less than 16' or more with lots of room despite the tight look on the chart.

There it is for me, a saved track I'll keep for my own pleasure. It gave me a great feeling bursting through the end and coasting into a big opening where I hove to and furled sails.

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The next morning, my son sailed off his mooring. I wouldn't have, normally, but how I could not now?

And so it goes, we sailed in a group out of the Thoroughfare on the N, 5-10. Once outside. Christmas got on a track out on the bay and left them behind. I set the rudder gain to 3 on the old WP and let her run from under the dodger and below to stay out of the rain. Kids don't mind the rain.

Just 48 hours, 3 sails, 42 NM, together-apart, unforgettable.

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Last edited:

Howler

Member
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The last time this boat sailed, my daughter was 1 year old. The cotton sails have been bagged since 1991. Except for a frozen barrel bolt (lashing instead), the sails went on in short order. Cotton, 40 years old and still in great shape, who knew? Still, I waited for this 5-knot wind, morning.

No motor, no oarlocks for the sweeps, we had to sail it out to windward.

View attachment 538531

MJ and I fell in love with the little boat a few yards off the dock when it was able to point up and clear the moored boats ahead.

View attachment 538533

Sweet little sailer.



This brings up the debate over what it takes to be sure that a boat has an actual soul. The boat pictured here obviously does, but where does one draw the line?
Years ago, when they were little, my kids asked why my Laser didn't have a name. I replied that it didn't have a name because it wasn't really a boat with a soul, but instead one of nearly 200,000 mass-produced plastic pieces of sporting equipment, like a pair of skis or a surfboard. Optis are different, I said, because even though they are mass-produced, they are loved by their little kid sailors, whose imagination breathes life and soul into them, and so they deserve names.
 

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