Food, fixes and notes from the casual coastal sailor.

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,545
2,548
Is it worth a couple of hundred bucks in materials and several hours of your time to claim 2 1/2" of storage space?

No way at home,....

View attachment 556388

but on a boat, sure (I think).

View attachment 556389

Nothing wrong with this, we always used the 'bracket' as a shelf/cubby to store a small dust pan and a few hot mitts. What we didn't have is convenient storage for oven-baking trays. So the few we kept, were stored in the oven. And I never liked that big chunk of wood through-bolted and sitting out there, just to house a 1/4" hole for the gimbal slide-lock. Centering the stove is out as the oven door wouldn't clear the cabinetry.

Design solution: Install 1/2" bulkhead to carry aft gimbal. That leaves 2 1/2" clear inside for oven pans (nesting, more than enough space for several). Add fiddled shelf on top. Should work.

New bulkhead spaced 3" from aft SS, rises - same height as forward SS - in stove area only. Top shelf curb at the height of the counter. 2 1/2" X +-16" clear below, narrow fiddled 2 1/2" shelf.

View attachment 556390
Boats are all about inches, and even fractions of inches. If you put pans in this "new" space, you'll need a means of retaining them while sailing.

I use tons of L-shaped aluminum extrusions to form supports for free-standing partitions of various materials. These are available in most good hardware stores or big-box stores, in various "leg" lengths and material thicknesses. Effectively, I use them as cleat stock for mounting shelves, etc.

You can round off the cut ends with a combination stationary belt/disk sander to give a finished look, countersink fastening holes, etc.

Sometimes you can find these in clear anodized finish, but they are more typically mill finish. Either way, they work a treat for projects like this.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,285
2,918
Boats are all about inches, and even fractions of inches. If you put pans in this "new" space, you'll need a means of retaining them while sailing.

I use tons of L-shaped aluminum extrusions to form supports for free-standing partitions of various materials. These are available in most good hardware stores or big-box stores, in various "leg" lengths and material thicknesses. Effectively, I use them as cleat stock for mounting shelves, etc.

You can round off the cut ends with a combination stationary belt/disk sander to give a finished look, countersink fastening holes, etc.

Sometimes you can find these in clear anodized finish, but they are more typically mill finish. Either way, they work a treat for projects like this.
Thanks, good thought.

I have used those hardware L shaped aluminum extrusions. They are easy to work and seem to hold up.

I'll add a high fiddle to keep the pans in there, up to a point (45 degrees?). Then they could topple out. I'll think of some sort of higher restraint or continue to sail flat,...

This gas conversion opens up new storage where the CNG tanks were stored. While I appreciated the fine work of the boatyard that installed the CNG system in the 90's, now I wish they had done a less professional install.

The rack consists of three bulkhead pieces, all glassed into the hull. Someone spent hours on this task.



Port locker (1 of 1).jpg


There is a huge dead space in the lazarette aft of the CNG tanks I'd like to reclaim. Plus the only access I have to the 'high loop' and outlet in the exhaust, is now only accessible through the starboard locker and an access I cut through the bulkhead that splits the lazarette (provides the mizzen step and the backstay chainplate anchor).

These cavernous full length lockers make life onboard for us. I'll add another chunk of storage here.

I'm thinking a multi-tool might cut through and shave the tabbed in, fiberglass joint along the hull?
It's the most dustless tool I can think of.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,545
2,548
Thanks, good thought.

I have used those hardware L shaped aluminum extrusions. They are easy to work and seem to hold up.

I'll add a high fiddle to keep the pans in there, up to a point (45 degrees?). Then they could topple out. I'll think of some sort of higher restraint or continue to sail flat,...

This gas conversion opens up new storage where the CNG tanks were stored. While I appreciated the fine work of the boatyard that installed the CNG system in the 90's, now I wish they had done a less professional install.

The rack consists of three bulkhead pieces, all glassed into the hull. Someone spent hours on this task.



View attachment 556548

There is a huge dead space in the lazarette aft of the CNG tanks I'd like to reclaim. Plus the only access I have to the 'high loop' and outlet in the exhaust, is now only accessible through the starboard locker and an access I cut through the bulkhead that splits the lazarette (provides the mizzen step and the backstay chainplate anchor).

These cavernous full length lockers make life onboard for us. I'll add another chunk of storage here.

I'm thinking a multi-tool might cut through and shave the tabbed in, fiberglass joint along the hull?
It's the most dustless tool I can think of.
Agreed on the tool. My Fein Multimaster is one of the most versatile tools in the toolbox. Blades are expensive.

I typically buy the titanium blades from these guys:

 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,285
2,918
What's with the wind these days? It seems that one roaring front comes through every few days. I'm right on the edge of the water with full Southern wind exposure, so my cover takes the full brunt of these 'blowers' with 50-knot gusts.

I have a 42'er with a deep keel and the mast in right next door. I check its stands regularly as the owner doesn't.

With a 2-year-old tarp and a few sticks, so far so good. Another one coming through today. I'm not sure what my 'builds' maximum wind is. I'm guessing 70 and then it's gone.

The miracle of triangulation.

IMG_5169.jpeg
 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
3,189
1,872
coastal NC
There is also a certain voice modulation that helps carry off German well. I can't claim to do it. But think about that voice you had years ago after a night of beer drinking in a smoky bar.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,545
2,548
There is also a certain voice modulation that helps carry off German well. I can't claim to do it. But think about that voice you had years ago after a night of beer drinking in a smoky bar.
Sometimes, it sounds like you need to cough it out, rather than saying it.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,285
2,918
Along with local launchings, we have lcoal sinkings, especially this time of the year. This is a fishing boat in Rockland Harbor.

1670506999021.png
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
3,285
2,918
The best winter boat projects entail little time on the boat (cold and dark). In a warm shop, a piece can sit on the bench and evolve slowly. An hour here, an hour there, there's no hurry.

I had to find a piece of SS to cut down. Metal is not my forte. This new bulkhead now anchors the aft gimbal.

IMG_5235.jpeg


Leaving the reclaimed 3" space for storage.

A filler stain fools the birch plywood into thinking it's mahogany (and little can be seen anyway). Followed by 3 coats of Petit wood sealer and 2 coats of Captain's gloss spar. Varnish is a permanent coating below decks, especially if low and out of the sun like this. Years of wiping down with a damp cloth will slowly turn the gloss to mat.

IMG_5232.jpeg


I need to think about a 20' gas line.
 

accnick

Super Anarchist
3,545
2,548
The best winter boat projects entail little time on the boat (cold and dark). In a warm shop, a piece can sit on the bench and evolve slowly. An hour here, an hour there, there's no hurry.

I had to find a piece of SS to cut down. Metal is not my forte. This new bulkhead now anchors the aft gimbal.

View attachment 558996

Leaving the reclaimed 3" space for storage.

A filler stain fools the birch plywood into thinking it's mahogany (and little can be seen anyway). Followed by 3 coats of Petit wood sealer and 2 coats of Captain's gloss spar. Varnish is a permanent coating below decks, especially if low and out of the sun like this. Years of wiping down with a damp cloth will slowly turn the gloss to mat.

View attachment 559002

I need to think about a 20' gas line.
I envy you having a nice shop and the boat a few hundred yards away from your house. That's still my idea of heaven.

The only thing better would be having the boat in a barn attached to your house, in the typical Maine manner.

No need to go outside in winter. Putter and dream until the snow melts.
 




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