Foods that might last awhile.

lostonsat

Member
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12
And then there is Purity Hard  Bread...

iu
Will last for years if kept dry, but you need a hammer to break it up to eat.

Lost

 

Ishmael

52,311
12,163
Fuctifino
Primitive peoples and the industrial food system both utilize the strategy of slaughtering animals as needed for food rather than engaging in lengthy storage of butchered meat.  It's difficult to do aboard -- even during the age of sail the slaughter of livestock on passage to feed those aboard was a practice that mainly served the culinary needs and desires of upper class individuals, whether passengers or officers, not crew.

Aside from grains there was never much long-term storage of food prior to the industrial food era (1920s on).  The back-to-the-land movement in the 1970s and present-day imitators put great focus on home preservation of food through canning, freezing, and drying but these practices were never widespread and were chiefly used to extend the useful life of food through the winter rather than provide a long-term reserve.
For some reason I was thinking about polar expeditions last night/early morning, and the benefits of using dog teams to pull the sleds. With the right planning, the team would return fairly well-fed but dogless. 

 

Rasputin22

Rasputin22
13,894
3,454
For some reason I was thinking about polar expeditions last night/early morning, and the benefits of using dog teams to pull the sleds. With the right planning, the team would return fairly well-fed but dogless. 
Old tradition in lifeboats,

Drawing lots to choose a victim who would die to feed the others was possibly first discussed on 16 or 17 July, and debate seems to have intensified on 21 July but without resolution. On 23 or 24 July, with Parker probably in a coma, Dudley told the others that it was better that one of them die so that the others survive and that they should draw lots. Brooks refused. That night, Dudley again raised the matter with Stephens pointing out that Parker was probably dying and that he and Stephens had wives and families. They agreed to leave the matter until the morning.

The following day, with no prospect of rescue in sight, Dudley and Stephens silently signalled to each other that Parker would be killed. Killing Parker before his natural death would mean blood to drink. Brooks, who had not been party to the earlier discussion, claimed to have signalled neither assent nor protest. Dudley always insisted that Brooks had assented. Dudley said a prayer and, with Stephens standing by to hold the youth's legs if he struggled, pushed his penknife into Parker's jugular vein, killing him.[13]

In some of the varying and confused later accounts of the killing, Parker murmured, "What me?" as he was slain.[14] The three fed on Parker's body, with Dudley and Brooks consuming the most and Stephens very little. The crew even finally managed to catch some rainwater. Dudley later described the scene, "I can assure you I shall never forget the sight of my two unfortunate companions over that ghastly meal. We all was like mad wolfs who should get the most, and for men—fathers of children—to commit such a deed, we could not have our right reason

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R_v_Dudley_and_Stephens

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,262
998
The Gorge
Certain situations will require you to store water:

  • Prolonged, unplanned power outages
  • Weather/natural events that disrupt utilities
  • Cruising on passage

It's always wise to stash one or two 5 gallon water cans. Every 6 months, dump the water into the veg garden and refill the cans with fresh water.
Well, I have a RO setup with a 20 gallon tank in the lab that constantly makes (and wastes) fresh DI water. (Because stored water absorbs CO2 and volatiles) So when the power goes out, I just have to hike out to the lab to fill the teapot.  While I pull on my boots to go start the generator and get the well back on line.   

My boat is relatively small - got 16 gallon tank and a water maker.  If I ever really take this boat "on passage" I'd can-up or more likely install a bladder tank in the bilge to have "get there" capacity in case the WM dies.  Current planning scenario is more like staying holed up in a nice anchorage for a while.  

 

slug zitski

Super Anarchist
6,160
1,199
worldwide
Primitive peoples and the industrial food system both utilize the strategy of slaughtering animals as needed for food rather than engaging in lengthy storage of butchered meat.  It's difficult to do aboard -- even during the age of sail the slaughter of livestock on passage to feed those aboard was a practice that mainly served the culinary needs and desires of upper class individuals, whether passengers or officers, not crew.

Aside from grains there was never much long-term storage of food prior to the industrial food era (1920s on).  The back-to-the-land movement in the 1970s and present-day imitators put great focus on home preservation of food through canning, freezing, and drying but these practices were never widespread and were chiefly used to extend the useful life of food through the winter rather than provide a long-term reserve.
Canning , lead poisoning from the can seam  and the Franklin Expedition 

https://www.historytoday.com/archive/canned-food-sealed-icemens-fate

8F8FDCED-DE97-4A18-933C-414D21DE85A7.png

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,262
998
The Gorge
You need some number of calories a day to remain strong and healthy.  The exact figure depends on activity levels, gender, weight, sleep habits, climate, and many other factors but I like to use 2500 calories for planning purposes.  Carbohydrates and proteins provide 4 calories per gram so through the awesome power of arithmetic we can see that you will need 625 grams of these to meet your needs.  Grains contain a negligible amount of fat.  Typical dry grains are a little over 10% water and have some non-digestible fiber (a few %) and the cooked yield is typically going to be around 90% due to food residue left on cooking and serving utensils, spills, food residue left on packing material, and so on.  So with some more arithmetic (625/.8) we get 781 grams.  Works out to 1.72 pounds.

A box of Kraft mac & cheese is 7.25 ounces and includes some fats that drive up the calorie content, and a gradskooler who adds a 5 oz can of tuna is eating 12.25 ounces of food.  Few gradskoolers would have one such meal a day and call it good -- there's going to be a peanut butter sandwich or beer or cereal or all three.  Most people don't realize how much they eat, and most people don't realize how great the calorie content is of beverage-type foods whether juices, soda, bheer, or 4loko.
Well of course there was a big sack of oatmeal and a jar of PB.  I usually figure more like 1600 kcal but whatevs.  BITD nerds were not expected to be strong and healthy.  (I actually got bitched out by the dean one time for going outside for some exercise but that's a different story.) I never could put away as much food as some sources recommend.  Maybe when I was bicycling long distances regularly.   

 

Zonker

Super Anarchist
9,664
5,621
Canada
Nutella tastes about the same after a few years. Home canned jam in glass mason jars last years easily. 

 

Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
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2,823
Whole corn and whole wheat or spelt can keep for several years under favorable conditions. Moisture will cause them to sprout and/or rot, though. I have been able to sprout and grow corn and spelt that is several years old. Since they are viable, I am sure they are also edible. I am not sure how you could reliably keep them dry on a boat. Maybe vacuum bag them with desiccant packs inside.
We used a vacuum sealer to break down large bags of flour, rice, etc.

The trick is to put the flour in a paper bag and tape it, THEN suck it down in a vacuum bag. Otherwise the flour gets sucked into the vacuum sealer which is not so good.

We had some dry goods kept for a pretty long time.

Also, stick it in the freezer overnight once it's sealed to kill any unwanted visitors.

 
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Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
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@Borax Johnson Frankly, I think you're asking a lot when you set the bar at "years" of storage. A year, two years tops is a more reasonable bar unless you're storing military MRE's or Mountain House freeze-dried hiking/survival food.
This is an important point.

Realistically speaking, unless you're Reid Stowe drawing hearts and sea turtles in the south Pacific on a Mars-inspired cheese caravel, you're really not going to be far away from someplace where you can get things like rice, dried beans, flour, etc. for a year. Maybe if you were planning an antarctic expedition or something, but being so far away from people you can't get anything for a year is very unlikely.

You can get most staples when you're "out there." Of course, you may not like the price or the quality. But dry goods aren't impossible to come by almost anywhere there are people. And people are almost everywhere.

But even if you're ranging quite far out from civilization, six months+ supply is quite a lot to carry. Yeah, you may have to make a stop somewhere ON the beaten path every few months. And if it's some fishing village in the Aleutians or an atoll in the Tuamotus, the quantity you can buy isn't like going to Costco, and neither are the prices. But you won't starve.

We did throw a week or two's worth of freeze dried backpacking food in deep storage, just in case. The only time we used any was when we sent off camping expeditions in the dinghy.

But we rarely stored anything more than six months before it got used, because a few months worth of something is about all you really need for most of the world.

Meat protein is maybe most problematic to store and carry. @estarzinger and his wife, as mentioned, are good resources for that - I guess you can can things and keep them. We have a freezer, and that's how we store most of our meats.

Four four of us, we stocked the freezer in Panama in April before we headed west and loaded it full of ground beef, pork loin, chicken breasts, and some cheese (you can freeze it OK if you are just cooking with it). We didn't buy much meat in the Galapagos, the Marquesas, or the Tuamotus, though we did eat on shore more than a few times. We finally ran out in July. We also bought a lot of fresh bread in the French countries, and fresh vegetables and fruits in markets.

 

Elegua

Generalissimo
Staples should be available everywhere. Your favorite brand of <input condiment x> is probably not. I’m going to load up on that. 

I bet there’s not much Branston Pickle or Ningchi Chili sauce in the South Pacific. 

 
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2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
Realistically speaking, unless you're Reid Stowe drawing hearts and sea turtles in the south Pacific on a Mars-inspired cheese caravel, you're really not going to be far away from someplace where you can get things like rice, dried beans, flour, etc. for a year. Maybe if you were planning an antarctic expedition or something, but being so far away from people you can't get anything for a year is very unlikely.
Usually people who want food to last for multiple years aren't actually planning on eating it.  They want to have it as a reserve while they eat something else.

That actually makes sense if you are responsible for, say, a mountaintop radio transmission facility where there's a real possibility that a crew working at the site could get stranded up there without much warning if the access road becomes impassible due to weather.  You might want to leave 2 people x 30 days of food and water on site with the idea that you'll throw it in the dumpster or give it to the food shelf every five years and replace it.  There are a few other similar situations where people may get stranded in a location where there isn't ordinarily any food, not many.

I think many people find something attractive about the idea that you can achieve a certain level of food security by just buying the right things and then forgetting about them.  Usually, but not always, the people who think like this don't have a particularly deep understanding of food preparation and meal planning.

I encourage people who are interested in food storage to start by seeing if they can plan ahead and then go for 14 days without purchasing any food.  Then try a 7 or 14 day period eating only shelf-stable foods, if that is the intended storage approach.  Most people can't do it.  Good way to learn.  The smart way to manage the food supply when out in the middle of nowhere (and I imagine that most of you who have done long passages or trips to remote areas know this) is to plan a progression of foods where you start out eating the bulky, perishable items (like leaf lettuce), then things that will keep longer like most fresh vegetables, then to things that have a limited but lengthy shelf life like potatoes, onions, squash, and cabbage, then onto things that are shelf stable like canned and dried items.  You augment that with frozen foods that are packed in such a way to maximize storage while still allowing access (by avoiding things like whole chicken that are bulky and things like frozen french fries that have good non-frozen alternatives).  Done right you can go 30 days with minimal freezer/fridge space and without making people bored.

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,262
998
The Gorge
Well, I do like to keep a few months of food on hand.  We do get cut off for weeks at a time, occasionally.  But the key is to rotate the stock, not just put it away forever.  

(The above-mentioned Dry Skimmed Milk was put away and forgotten, but happily seemed to be OK.  Left over from a protein-bar making enterprise, during which I discovered that I can't make decent protein-bars any cheaper than I can simply buy them.  At least on any reasonable scale.)

Since the boat is my "fallback shelter" in case of wildfire or other disaster, ideally I'd like to keep it stocked as well.  And there's always the idea that "if only" I could take off on a cruise at a moments notice...   When not cruising, what that looks like is loading a bunch of stuff on in the spring and taking it all off again in the fall.  It occurred to me that what I really should be doing is making a point of having dinner (at least) on the boat once a week (at least.) Even if it's just sitting at the dock.  Thus keeping it well-stocked and in the rotation. (The problem with that is that the marina is technically "in town" so the boat is within walking distance of half a dozen brew pubs.  :rolleyes: )

 




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