Full batten main with swept spreaders?

OCS

Member
It doesn't need to be all-or-nothing. Mixing full and partial battens is common and a nice solution. I have 5 battens, 3 of which are full and 2 partial. Less flogging, less chafe, less hardware but not a completely locked shape.  For smaller mains you can get away with allslip slides. 
Makes sense, best of both worlds, full battens up high with most of the benefits of an FB main and shorter battens low to avoid chafe which occurs on monohulls ( usually ok on multis with apparent wind further forward in decent breeze).

sailmaker of 40+ years 

 

thinwater

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...with my sailmaker. He claimed that full battens would make it more difficult to hold the main to zero wind....
I'll blunt (this is SA?). Your sailmaker has no idea what he is taking about in this specific case. It's just not a problem.

As for crew, I singlehand 80% of the time. That's what the AP is for. Obviously, you need to maintain a minimum speed, typically 3 knots or so.

 
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On 2/17/2020 at 4:00 PM, fsiljelof said:
Any thoughts on how a full batten main will perform with swept spreaders? We have a Prima 38 with a rig very similar to the Farr 40 rig (clearly swept spreaders).

We race only shorthanded and are considering full length battens for longer sail life and ease of dousing/ flaking the main .... we've always raced her with a bolt rope luff and only the top batten being full length. However after a few hard wind ocean races we do spend too much time and energy reefing (or should I say too much time reefed/ unreefed when we should have been set up the other way around) - so we're going with a new battcar main for ease of reefing/ hoisting and we're considering full length battens to keep things as simple as possible. Good or bad idea for shorthanded racing? What sail shape can I expect with full length battens and swept spreaders on a deep run?

We’re going with carbon battens if we go full length.


, if you can get them.  You don’t necessarily need carbon. They’re almost unbreakable!  And, proper batten boxes, toggles, and low friction luff cars/Slides are mandatory. 
+1

cayuse new main IMG_0731.JPG

 
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Zonker

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Except for faster racing boats carbon battens don't make sense with swept spreaders.

Carbon does NOT like impacts. Battens hitting shrouds during uncontrolled gybes fit that description. Fiberglass, while heavier, is much more damage tolerant.

However if you are the kind of person that carries carbon uni tape on board for repairs, have at it. Just make sure the taper for the broken splice is very very shallow.

 

slug zitski

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Carbon reduces weight aloft 

this is significant for a mainsail 

less inertia make the sail stable in light wind , confused seaway conditions 

if you got the cash go carbon 

 
Except for faster racing boats carbon battens don't make sense with swept spreaders.

Carbon does NOT like impacts. Battens hitting shrouds during uncontrolled gybes fit that description. Fiberglass, while heavier, is much more damage tolerant.

However if you are the kind of person that carries carbon uni tape on board for repairs, have at it. Just make sure the taper for the broken splice is very very shallow.
Sail is North 3Di raw  /carbon, so I’m thinking paying for less weight in the sail and adding extra with full length glass battens seems like a waste, rig is carbon, but the Prima is no lightweighter by modern means, so for overall weight I don’t think it will have any effect what so ever - but for weight up top / in the sail - I’m thinking less weight is better ...

 

neuronz

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europe
As some have suggested already, think about mixing 2-3 full battens at the top with half battens in the lower half of the sail. That should get you the best of both worlds. You should be able to open the top without flogging in strong winds and still have good shape in the bottom.

 

JL92S

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Sail is North 3Di raw  /carbon, so I’m thinking paying for less weight in the sail and adding extra with full length glass battens seems like a waste, rig is carbon, but the Prima is no lightweighter by modern means, so for overall weight I don’t think it will have any effect what so ever - but for weight up top / in the sail - I’m thinking less weight is better ...
I would seriously recommend getting North to add the offshore ply if you haven’t specced that already, it’s in the middle of the laminate so you don’t notice it but it just provides a little extra stiffness to the sail. We race a SF3600 offshore double handed and our main is  3di raw with the offshore ply on a bolt rope and has a small sewn in gaff batten and 2 full top battens and the other 4 are regular battens, we can alter the shape any way we want but in the gusts we can de power the main and the head sometimes will gently lift back and forth but not flog. It’s a great sail

 


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