Galley equipment

Bull City

A fine fellow
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2,678
North Carolina
I am looking for some new pepper & salt grinders for my home galley  :p . I have been eyeing a pair of Peugeot Bistro Chef Salt & Pepper Mills, and wondered if anyone had any suggestions on these or others.

Thanks.

B.C.

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toddster

Super Anarchist
4,265
999
The Gorge
Those look nice.  I have to admit that I gave up on anything so elegant when Costco started selling these disposable ones.  They have that certain redneck "cares enough to grind but not enough to give a fuck how it looks" vibe.

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Ishmael

52,559
12,347
Fuctifino
A simple mortar & pestle with 30secs of sweat equity is out then?
Get a grip. 2 seconds of grinding and no cleanup vs. 30 seconds of crunching and three minutes of washing the damn thing. The only thing I use a mortar and pestle for with pepper is for steak au poivre, where the uneven pepper bits actually help the program.

 
Another vote for the Peugeot mechanism. We have had the bigger versions for maybe 6 years and the mechanism has held up far better than any other. The Salt and Pepper grinders are permanent residents on the table.

The only other one I see as indispensable is the rather cheap ($12), ugly, and not so durable (had to replace it after a couple of years) crank grinder from OXO. This sits by the stove, for times when you need to grind a LOT of pepper in a hurry.  I'd definitely consider it for a boat grinder, depending on the lack of elegance you can live with. 

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https://www.amazon.com/OXO-Good-Grips-Lewis-Pepper/dp/B003L0OOQM/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=good+grips+pepper+grinder&qid=1558415886&s=gateway&sr=8-5

 

weightless

Super Anarchist
5,607
583
We have had the bigger versions for maybe 6 years and the mechanism has held up far better than any other.
I didn't know that pepper mills went bad so often. There's one that has been in full time use for around 50 years on various family tables in my clan and several others old enough to vote. 6 years seems like a short life for a pepper mill. What fails in them?

 
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Ajax

Super Anarchist
14,814
3,085
Edgewater, MD
I find that the humidity ruins salt, pepper and most other spices. Grinders and other dirt-bound containers do not keep the humidity out.

I ended up putting salt, pepper and a "provincial blend" in replicas of vintage, US Navy mustard and pepper bottles, capping them off with corks.  It's the only thing that kept the spices from caking up into unusable bricks. Even then, I had to put a few grains of rice in with the salt to absorb whatever moisture got into the bottle during use.

https://www.eparks.com/product/44833/Clear-Pepper-Bottle/

Unfortunately, this means no fresh grinding and you have to shake a bit into the palm of your hand and spread it over your food the old way.

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,066
2,678
North Carolina
We have a pair from Crate & Barrel. The salt grinder is clogged with salt - humudity may have something to do with it - and the pepper will not adjust to anything finer than coarse. The mechanisms have a lot of plastic. 

Thanks for the suggestions.

I'm thinking the Peugeot pair, and maybe these:

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Jim in Halifax

Super Anarchist
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Nova Scotia
Peugeot are the best, bar none. Like another poster here, we have some that have been passed down through generations. But on board keep your salt and pepper mills in a ziplock bag or a Tupperware container and change out the contents for fresh every season - moisture is the enemy when it comes to peppercorns and rock salt.

 

SloopJonB

Super Anarchist
68,789
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Great Wet North
Get a grip. 2 seconds of grinding and no cleanup vs. 30 seconds of crunching and three minutes of washing the damn thing. The only thing I use a mortar and pestle for with pepper is for steak au poivre, where the uneven pepper bits actually help the program.
The only use for a mortar and pestle nowadays is for grinding drugs.

 

toddster

Super Anarchist
4,265
999
The Gorge
I use M&P quite a lot in the lab for homogenizing samples, none of which is "drugs."  I've got a whole cupboard full of various sizes, including a couple made of agate, for grinding really hard stuff.  

Also have a wooden S&P set, like those pictured above, but they tend to get grimy over time and are hard to wash.

 

IStream

Super Anarchist
10,866
3,048
The only use for a mortar and pestle nowadays is for grinding drugs.
Not if you use saffron regularly in your cooking. If you grind those threads into powder, they go much farther. At $3000/kg, it helps both the dish and the wallet.

 

Israel Hands

Super Anarchist
2,920
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coastal NC
I used to keep 3 seasonings in the boat:  Salt, pepper, and Old Bay.  Having spent a good part of my career in the food industry, I have a deep admiration for the roundness of flavor in Old Bay.  It goes well in a great many foods.

While Old Bay dominates as a consumer brand for crab and seafood seasoning on the east coast, the restaurant and foodservice trade secretly uses a close cousin, J.O. Spice, for cooking crabs. A recent survey showed more than 50% of the Maryland crab houses surveyed used J.O. Spice. J.O.'s marketing claim is that its seasoning has coarser salt which sticks to steamed crabs better, but I think it's really about price. Old Bay was invented by an immigrant fleeing Nazi Germany; it developed a big regional following and eventually the brand was acquired by McCormick and nationally promoted.  J.O. Spice was invented by a couple on Tangier Island (VA) and is found in foodservice rather than retail...and costs about 40% less.

 
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I didn't know that pepper mills went bad so often. There's one that has been in full time use for around 50 years on various family tables in my clan and several others old enough to vote. 6 years seems like a short life for a pepper mill. What fails in them?
I expect those Peugeot mills will keep going many years as well, I've only had this particular pair six years. In my experience the cheaper mills weak point is usually the shaft or the attachment of the burrs to the shaft or the head. The burrs on the OXO mill, for instance, are ceramic and will likely last near forever, but the shaft attachments and supports are molded plastic or stamped metal and will eventually wear and fail. As with many things, it's harder to find products made with quality and longevity in mind, rather than only price. 

 

Bull City

A fine fellow
7,066
2,678
North Carolina
I use a M&P for making a garlic paste with salt or anchovies, or herbs. And for grinding coffee beans when the power is out.

I ordered some Peugeots and I'm looking forward to trying them.

 




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