Getting a Crapload of Work Done on the Boat..

Soñadora

Super Anarchist
Thanks Matt!

Any tips on finding used billboard material?

I was thinking about using 3" PVC along with typical PVC connectors (tee, street Y, etc). A Y would allow me to create a sort of eave. Not sure about putting it in the ground though. They had 3' of water in there last spring. Of course, they didn't tell me that until recently <_<

 

belandm

Super Anarchist
1,504
0
Everett, WA
Just Google. I know several people who've used different sites and none of them have reported any particular problems or incredibly lower prices.

3" PVC seems like a huge size. 1" is large enough to support a very large structure in a big wind - it'll move, but that's good, helps relieve the stress. At 3" it won't have much flex and seems like it's far more likely to break under the stress.

You might also take a look at this place: http://www.shelters-to-go.com/

They have connectors both standard and custom-made for building shelters. Special angles and shapes for roofs and eaves, among other things. A little pricey, but much the easiest way to go.

 
113
0
[donning the Captian Obvious hat]

Next weekend is October. A metric shitload of work to be done for June needs to start in October.

Decide, and act. Now.

[/hat]
Exactly what I was just thinking this morning, you beat me to it.

If you HAVE to have it done by June, decommission the boat this week and tear right into it.

My annual procedure:

Keep the boat in as late as possible because "I can still get out a few more times"

Watch 8 Nor'easters in a row blow through every day off I have.

Waste Sept, Oct and half of Nov (average temp - 70, 60, 50), thinking, talking and reading about the perfect winter cover.

Slowly realize that it would take me weeks and $$ to build a 38'x16'x17' winter cover/shed that would withstand 16" of wet snow and 50 knot winds which happens at least twice a year.

Build a quick a-frame and cover it with a tarp.

Jan and Feb are the only two months that have the conditions you describe, spend them working on stuff you've brought home to your shop and at the Miami boat Show.

To insulate the floors you could cover them with blue sheet foam (better R-value than pink) and some 1/4" plywood, and also cover every other flat horizontal and vertical surface you have including the ceiling using wedged in furring strips as battens where feasible.

 

Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
43,046
2,824
[donning the Captian Obvious hat]

Next weekend is October. A metric shitload of work to be done for June needs to start in October.

Decide, and act. Now.

[/hat]
Exactly what I was just thinking this morning, you beat me to it.

If you HAVE to have it done by June, decommission the boat this week and tear right into it.

My annual procedure:

Keep the boat in as late as possible because "I can still get out a few more times"

Watch 8 Nor'easters in a row blow through every day off I have.

Waste Sept, Oct and half of Nov (average temp - 70, 60, 50), thinking, talking and reading about the perfect winter cover.

Slowly realize that it would take me weeks and $$ to build a 38'x16'x17' winter cover/shed that would withstand 16" of wet snow and 50 knot winds which happens at least twice a year.

Build a quick a-frame and cover it with a tarp.

Jan and Feb are the only two months that have the conditions you describe, spend them working on stuff you've brought home to your shop and at the Miami boat Show.

To insulate the floors you could cover them with blue sheet foam (better R-value than pink) and some 1/4" plywood, and also cover every other flat horizontal and vertical surface you have including the ceiling using wedged in furring strips as battens where feasible.
My wife's been making those sorts of noises to. We generally cruise until almost the end of October...mental therapy from her hideous job.

Hate to give that up, but it may be the wiser thing to do.

 
B.J. - I am not sure if StaceyNeil is still lurking but they did a major refit of Zora (she was a CW judge for BOY once)on the inside. You maybe able to work something where u can work outside and then move it inside for the jan/feb months...

I also had a friend that lived on a Pearson 26 in Boston harbor during the winter with a professional cover (heat shrink) over her boat - all was good until one day she fell in..and recovered...but they make zippers and everything for doors.

just an fyi..

ps - I am putting you on my "I hate you" list...it includes two buddies of mine that did the bermuda 1-2 this year...grin...

 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
6,821
1,154
San Diego
Since you're doing this to take off on a long cruise - I would highly recommend doing as much work yourself as possible. This is the best way to imbed knowledge of the systems/location/function of systems. If you have to farm projects out, ensure that you can be there & question anything that you do not understand. There is no warrantee service once you leave the dock - you have to be able to diagnose & fix 90% of problems. Hopefully you can work around the last 10% of issues (which is a very good thought process while doing all this anyway - what happens when this doesn't work?)

 

breezetrees

Member
161
41
SF Bay
Why the June deadline? You need to embrace the cruising lifestyle (at least from this wage slave's perspective): do it yourself, do it the cheapest way possible, and if the schedule slips, at least you're living aboard somewhere nice.

 

Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
43,046
2,824
Why the June deadline? You need to embrace the cruising lifestyle (at least from this wage slave's perspective): do it yourself, do it the cheapest way possible, and if the schedule slips, at least you're living aboard somewhere nice.
That's when we are planning to leave because that's when the kids finish school and my wife's obligations at work end. We'd like to point the boat far away then, not fart around in our home waters for two more months doing more work on a boat we've had plenty if time to prepare.

It's when we want to leave. My son and I want to catch some of the AC World Series at the end of June anyway, so we probably will still be in the area. But we'd rather not bs stuck in one place doing boat work.

 

sailflat

Super Anarchist
1,084
2
3) Wet store option #2 - no heat install. Rely on electric heaters like those oil filled things that won't set the boat on fire. Still have a mostly standup cover to work under.

Pros: Cheapest option by far.

Cons: Electric metering costs in yard are TBD - these things would probably have to be on 24x7 o keep the boat at a workable temperature, heaters under foot, questionable ability to use for a fallback place to live. They still might catch on fire. The biggest problem is the lack of 110V capability on the boat; I have 220 from shore power but very little 110V (1200W) from a small inverter (which isn't reliable and is slated for replacement). So I'd have to sort out getting either 220 units OR find some way to transform enough shore power to 110V to run them.
Getting 110 from 220 is easy...

220 is 110 x 2 legs

You should find 4 conductors on the plug. 2 110 legs, 1 neutral, 1 ground...

Connect 1 leg and the neutral and you have 110. If you use 2 heaters, connect 1 to each leg to load balance. Go to lowes and get a cheap small breaker box, a 30 or 40 amp breaker, some wire, 2 110 outlets, a piece of plywood to mount it all on and get to it. Rig it up temporary and leave a slot in a temp hatch board for the shore power cable to go though if you don't already have a shore power plug on board to wire into.

 

paps49

Super Anarchist
8,932
309
Adelaide Australia
Why the June deadline? You need to embrace the cruising lifestyle (at least from this wage slave's perspective): do it yourself, do it the cheapest way possible, and if the schedule slips, at least you're living aboard somewhere nice.
That's when we are planning to leave because that's when the kids finish school and my wife's obligations at work end. We'd like to point the boat far away then, not fart around in our home waters for two more months doing more work on a boat we've had plenty if time to prepare.

It's when we want to leave. My son and I want to catch some of the AC World Series at the end of June anyway, so we probably will still be in the area. But we'd rather not bs stuck in one place doing boat work.
BJ, I think you are sweating it a little too much. The biggest thing you will have to adjust to is going from civilization into "cruising" mode. This can take a little while for most people, so you will have a settling in period while you adjust to the new lifestyle and get re acclimatised. From what I know your boat is basically sound and well looked after. Your wife particularly if going straight from a busy practice, will need some "adapting" time

Why not do what you can comfortably, between now and June. Head south to warmer climes and do some of the other stuff there. You will save a heap of dollars on storage, have something to do while you settle in to the new lifestyle and make the transition. If a job gets to messy to live aboard its a perfect opportunity for a romantic on shore getaway.

Its all part of the "experience". There is no such thing IMHO as being totally ready and "casting off". Its not just a matter of flicking a switch. Ease into it. You might very well find once you throw the docklines there are some things you might have done differently.

Get the feel for your own brand of what living aboard means gradually while you finish things off. There is no hurry on a well found cruising boat. When its the right time you set off. Schedules are for the working class for the most part. In my experience the "cruisers" who get into strife are the ones sailing to a tight schedule. Go with the flow.

Just my 2c

 
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Not My Real Name

Not Actually Me
43,046
2,824
Why the June deadline? You need to embrace the cruising lifestyle (at least from this wage slave's perspective): do it yourself, do it the cheapest way possible, and if the schedule slips, at least you're living aboard somewhere nice.
That's when we are planning to leave because that's when the kids finish school and my wife's obligations at work end. We'd like to point the boat far away then, not fart around in our home waters for two more months doing more work on a boat we've had plenty if time to prepare.

It's when we want to leave. My son and I want to catch some of the AC World Series at the end of June anyway, so we probably will still be in the area. But we'd rather not bs stuck in one place doing boat work.
BJ, I think you are sweating it a little too much. The biggest thing you will have to adjust to is going from civilization into "cruising" mode. This can take a little while for most people, so you will have a settling in period while you adjust to the new lifestyle and get re acclimatised. From what I know your boat is basically sound and well looked after. Your wife particularly if going straight from a busy practice, will need some "adapting" time

Why not do what you can comfortably, between now and June. Head south to warmer climes and do some of the other stuff there. You will save a heap of dollars on storage, have something to do while you settle in to the new lifestyle and make the transition. If a job gets to messy to live aboard its a perfect opportunity for a romantic on shore getaway.

Its all part of the "experience". There is no such thing IMHO as being totally ready and "casting off". Its not just a matter of flicking a switch. Ease into it. You might very well find once you throw the docklines there are some things you might have done differently.

Get the feel for your own brand of what living aboard means gradually while you finish things off. There is no hurry on a well found cruising boat. When its the right time you set off. Schedules are for the working class for the most part. In my experience the "cruisers" who get into strife are the ones sailing to a tight schedule. Go with the flow.

Just my 2c
Our schedule isn't "tight" beyond an overwhelming desire to get the hell out of here and start living ASAP... Having heard the definition of "Cruising" as "Doing boat work in exotic places" I expect that we will be doing a fair amount of what you hint at anyway. But a couple of months of just stretching our legs and enjoying a fully functional boat would be a good way to start.

What I don't want to do is do Ready, Set, STOP! and spend half the summer finishing the crap I didn't get to and end up in some suspended animation half life anchored near my ex-club by my ex-mooring clinging to one car left that we can't sell yet because need it to run to Defender & West with for parts and supplies.

That being said, out studies have led us to a conclusion and a plan. The only real write-off months (for space heaters if they don't get it done) are January and February and really early March. If (or should I say IFF for you logic geeks) we don't get an offer on our house by the end of October the odds of us needing to live on board prior to March are practically zero. So the following assumptions can be made:

1) If someone makes an offer on the house with a closing date prior to late January-ish, we go drop the cash on an Espar heat system and spend the winter on the boat. Otherwise we tough it out with space heaters for work over the winter and don't plan to move on the boat until early spring.

2) In extremis, staying at a Residence Inn / Extended Stay sort of place for a two months is STILL cheaper than the Espar system. So if someone wants to close on Feb 15th we can just do that for a month or so. And you get free breakfast.

So the plan is:

1) End the fall cruising season this weekend; one last trip and done.

2) Early next week move the boat to a marina nearby where we will wet store

3) Drop the rig in another 1-2 weeks for work on that. It may or may not go back up; it would be quieter to leave it down (in-mast furling goes bumpity-bump without a sail on) but I need to do some things like wrap up the SSB installation and test it, etc. Maybe can wait for spring or get a little whip and stick it on the rail for the testing. Not bad to have a backup SSB antenna anyway in case the mast falls off.

4) Cover the boat with a cover I can stand up under.

5) Work like a mad bastard until the water is too cold for reverse cycle heat.

6) Try out electric heaters, see how it goes. Be prepared to write off two months of freezing time if that doesn't work.

7) Take what I an home to work on, eg. lazarette covers etc. to do in the off months. Assuming I have a home.

I think the above plan will increase the odds that I don't have to spend a crapload on indoor storage OR a heater I really only need for one winter, while giving me more time to work and try to get stuff done. Things go so much faster when you don't have to button the boat back up every weekend for use...

Thanks all for input, I've gotten some good ideas that we're using.

 




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