GGR 2022

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
7,019
1,299
San Diego
As an amateur engineer taught by experience making shit for boats, I much prefer the center mount. BOTH lower braces will be loaded, one side in tension while the other side is in compression. Equal angles means equal loading. The off center mounts have all the lateral loads on one brace, the other is just holding the lower leg away from the transom.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

Super Anarchist
6,568
1,912
Canada
Noah's Jest. Another Rustler.
Edward from Canada took no chances with his prep and set up his Rustler with a second Hydrovane, ready to go.
Unfortunately Edward returned to Les Sables d'Olonne today and have decided not to continue.

A pitty, because he came well prepared with 2 solo Atlantic crossings with his boat.

View attachment 540143

What reason(s) did he give? (If any, thus far. A hell of an expensive and time-consuming endeavour to suddenly abandon.)
 

harrygee

Member
391
121
Tasmania
They're all going to be close to that low that's coming so there'll be a good opportunity for a brain-storm gamble, maybe head west to get around it.
They don't have the benefit of a satellite picture but a weatherfax will be showing that system well enough to make an informed decision. or a "get me out of here" decision. It's early days to be getting beat up while they're settling in.

And Simon is heading offshore.
 

trisail

Anarchist
508
564
As an amateur engineer taught by experience making shit for boats, I much prefer the center mount. BOTH lower braces will be loaded, one side in tension while the other side is in compression. Equal angles means equal loading. The off center mounts have all the lateral loads on one brace, the other is just holding the lower leg away from the transom.
Good afternoon,
This is going to be an interesting discussion.

A few days before the start, another competitor using a Hydrovane discovered a crack in one of the bottom transom brackets of his unit. He replaced the fitting by lying on his tummy on the pontoon and reaching in underneath the boat. It was not a quick and easy job with the boat in the water.
The owner and designer of the Windpilot, www.windpilot.com writes an interesting blog about these brackets and just how strained they are when steering loads are imposed on them. The Blog dated 05/07/2021 has a good explanation and there he predicts exactly the problem which Damien Guillou encountered this week!
Longy above is spot on. The Windpilot designer states the same view as you about those two legs at the bottom of the unit.
Littlechay's comments about movement and flexing are symilar to that of the Windpilot designer's concerns. Flexing of the brackets and the dangers of subsequent metal fatigue.
The GGR requires all boats to have a ready to fit emergency rudder, except if it is a Hydrovane This requirement is probably the major reason for the 12 out of 16 boats having fitted Hydrovane units. The requirement or rule makes no sense at all for long keeled boats with rudders attached to the trailing edge of the keel.
So, one boat having to return due to windvane issues and one escaping by the skin of it's teeth.

Let the debate continue..... We can all learn something here.
 

low bum

Member
325
236
Tennessee
I can't find a blog dated 5/7/21 but this is extremely interesting to me. I came close to pulling the trigger on a Hydrovane because they offered me a sweet deal, and I also like the emergency rudder aspect. But I've also considered the Aries and the Windpilot. I always thought the Windpilot mounting brackets looked very fragile, but maybe they don't have to be that heavy because they don't have to steer the boat, so this makes a lot more sense now.
 

littlechay

Super Anarchist
1,140
520
Nelson
Lifted from Facebook. An extra brace added, now it can't flex. Much better.
1662844722475.png
 

littlechay

Super Anarchist
1,140
520
Nelson
A quick look at Gillou's options up until the leaders reach the Canaries suggest no go gain and likely a slight loss. He will have a tricky corner !
Simon Curwen - Yellow
Damien Guillou - Blue

Screenshot 2022-09-11 100950.png
 

harrygee

Member
391
121
Tasmania
I can't see any change to the original brackets, unless the pivot bolt has been replaced. My old eyes can't tell.

The cast fittings all look original.

The new brace will help and the bigger footprint has to be a good thing.

I wonder what he noticed, that alerted him to a problem.

If the pivot bolt sheared, surely they would all carry a spare. Replacement at sea would be a challenge but possible.
 

longy

Overlord of Anarchy
7,019
1,299
San Diego
I believe original problem was bolt sheared. Extra strut will reduce loading on the other two. However notice corossion around lower stbd cast alloy clamp. I would NOT be surprised if some of these clamps fail across the fleet. Unknown as to why new strut has backing plate under it
 
The GGR requires all boats to have a ready to fit emergency rudder, except if it is a Hydrovane This requirement is probably the major reason for the 12 out of 16 boats having fitted Hydrovane units. The requirement or rule makes no sense at all for long keeled boats with rudders attached to the trailing edge of the keel.
So, one boat having to return due to windvane issues and one escaping by the skin of it's teeth.

McIntyre must have gotten some pretty sweet kickbacks from Hydrovane. Can't wait to see what else awaits us in the Golden Grift Race 2022.
 
I got to know Elliot and his supporting team in LSO.
They quickly became affectionately known as The Hippies. What a super nice guy he is. Well mannered, kind.

A breath of fresh air to the race.
He has my admiration. I wish him the best of luck.
Regards.

I hope he finishes. Even though some might consider him an outlier or not “bona fide” in terms of experience, I think he just might have what it takes to do well. He seems well adjusted and optimistic, and his lack of (stated) expectations beyond have a great life experience just might set him up to not take things too seriously and roll With the punches. Nice to hear that he comes across decent, genuine folk and I share your admiration that at his age and lack of resources he was able to pull it all together and make the start.
 
@trisail, my greatest disappointment is that the race has started and you know longer have anything to report. I genuinely offer you my thanks for your efforts.

Although I probably posted it before, you have managed to do what no one else in the race, the GGR, or the mainstream media has been able to do - you captured a 360-degree view of the event and made (me at least) care about it in a way that converted me from fleeting interest to “interested follower.”

I don’t know if working in media is your day job, or if you just possess that intuitive special sauce of knowing what people will connect with, but golf clap to you, Sir. Either the GGR or some other race organization would be well advised to add you to their media team.

If you’re on the Instagram and would like to add a follower, please DM your handle! I’d like to see what else you get up to.

Happy trails.
 

littlechay

Super Anarchist
1,140
520
Nelson
Kirsten Neuschafer from South Africa in a advantageous position on the left side of a low pressure area moving east.
She is the only woman in the fleet but proves tactical.
Yes, she has moved into position nicely there but won't make any inroads on the leader at this stage. It is a drag race to the Cape Verdes now with no particularly favoured route. The choice being influenced by whether they want to pass the doldrums on the east or west side.
 
7
4
US
I noticed many skippers are posting on Twitter….was there a change to allow certain electronics to keep interest in the race up or is this being done by managers on land via SSB from the boats?
 

trisail

Anarchist
508
564
@trisail, my greatest disappointment is that the race has started and you know longer have anything to report. I genuinely offer you my thanks for your efforts.

Although I probably posted it before, you have managed to do what no one else in the race, the GGR, or the mainstream media has been able to do - you captured a 360-degree view of the event and made (me at least) care about it in a way that converted me from fleeting interest to “interested follower.”

I don’t know if working in media is your day job, or if you just possess that intuitive special sauce of knowing what people will connect with, but golf clap to you, Sir. Either the GGR or some other race organization would be well advised to add you to their media team.

If you’re on the Instagram and would like to add a follower, please DM your handle! I’d like to see what else you get up to.

Happy trails.

Good morning,
Thanks for the kind words!

No, I am not a media guy at all and I have very limited social media skills.

As I've said before, I was in Les Sables d'Olonne as Team Manager for a very good friend who is sailing the race.

I noticed that Sailing Anarchy gives the event no coverage but that there was some interest in the Forums, a fair amount being rather critical. Some criticism deserved, some not.

But it is sailing, there is more than one boat, that makes it a race and they are crossing oceans. So it's an ocean race. And with one or two exceptions they all have serious ocean racing and, or, offshore racing track records.

Now I must explain, not one of us Team Managers have any idea of what a Team Manager's duties are. We all agreed that we were just there as spanner boys and girls but we all had a great time and became firm friends.

The sailors (the entrants) across the board are all nice people who mingled and socialised easily with one another and I am certain they will be friends for life after this event. One of the nice things about a solo race is that the entrants all socialise together. If it was a crewed event, you would have socialised with your crew and not necessarily with crews from other boats.

Because I have a direct association with a competitor, I have to be careful in what I post so as not to put him or the organisers in a spot.

All in all, being there and feeling the vibe and being able to witness the sailors throw off their mooring lines and leave LSO was a once in a lifetime experience.

I think few offshore sailors can witness that without being inspired to come back in 2026 as a competitor.

At the same time I would say that should you wish to sail the event, step one will be to have a one-on -one meeting with one of the current competitors. It will be very valuable to learn first-hand what to do to avoid the many pitfalls along the way to the start. In fact I suggested to my friend that he compile a "How to enter the Golden Globe" document once he gets back.

Regards.
 

harrygee

Member
391
121
Tasmania
Don's formula for level racing seems to be working, at least as well as the more scientific efforts.

The Ten Ton class.

As decreed by a benevolent dictator.

It works, at least in moderate to fresh conditions, with a variety of different designs showing similar speeds, unlike the previous race, where the Rustlers were dominant.

In the light conditions that they experienced earlier, they were in the lee so it may have been a bit of a lottery or the better sailors made gains.

There have been a couple of considered punts so far, most notably Tapio's excursion out west and Kirsten's similar effort, neither of which has made huge gains or losses but it makes for a lot more interest for we of the "Throne of Knowledge".

Go Kirsten.

If there's any trend showing so far, I'd guess that Simon Kirwen knows how to sail, Tapio is confident in his boat and also knows how to sail and Kirsten, like Tapio, is prepared to make her own decisions.

And there's a competitive fleet close behind who are possibly nursing their resources. And a Frenchman of some repute who may flog them all.

I'll add my thanks to trisail. Your skipper chose his team Manager wisely. If you decide to have a go at this nonsense yourself, Bonne Chance.
 




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