Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

Jim in Halifax

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He was very kind and supportive, but at the end he sheepishly said that it was apparent to him that Erik was just not a very experienced sailor. He also said that his boat was absolutely not engineered to be out in those conditions and he didn't sail in small boats like that because he "didn't know how to make them safe."
Although a very skilled big boat sailor, I think Chris maybe lacks Erik's small boat, solo-sailing experiences (perhaps by choice). Many, many sailors have been making ocean passages as well as rounding the world in forty footers or smaller for a very long time. Some have survived horrendous weather. I think Jean Socrates could teach both these guys a thing or two.
 

low bum

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Tennessee
Although a very skilled big boat sailor, I think Chris maybe lacks Erik's small boat, solo-sailing experiences (perhaps by choice). Many, many sailors have been making ocean passages as well as rounding the world in forty footers or smaller for a very long time. Some have survived horrendous weather. I think Jean Socrates could teach both these guys a thing or two.
Absolutely - and this to me shows that he has a blind spot where competent small boat sailing is concerned. I had a friend who flew for Delta and I was thinking of getting my license and getting a small plane and I asked him. He acted genuinely shocked and said no way would he set foot in a little plane again - they're not safe, etc. etc. Just like Chris's take on small boats. It's just mind set.
 

low bum

Member
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Tennessee
I had less experience than you on ocean sailing. I sailed all my life on dinghies and hobies, and on small 22 and 23 ft cabin boats on a local little lake before buying my boat in late 2018. My wife and I sailed it to the San Blas islands 40 miles from the marina it lived in twice as shake down cruises. Then I took off solo across the Pacific April 1. It was definitely a steep learning curve, but turned out to be quite manageable, even the two rough times I had to go down to staysail only, and the rough entry into Makemo atoll, my first attempt at a pass. But otherwise it was pretty easy in the end of the day, and now I feel quite comfortable with it all. I am 67 so hope I can stay healthy and safe for three more years. Holly and Barry (aka The Old Seadog on Youtube) were quite an inspiration that one could do this solo on an older boat.
Holly's channel has really opened my mind up to the Pacific. The people seem to be uniformly the most gracious, kind and welcoming folks you could imagine.

Is it truly more "peaceful" there? Fewer storms? I think the cyclone season is exactly the same as the Atlantic hurricane season.

Anyway, of all the You Tubers out there, I think Wind Hippie may be the one I admire the most. Really admirable courage and determination.
 
Wind Hippy is fantastic to follow, just a tremendously jolly person clearly in it for sharing the lived experience and not the dollars. Granted, having been raised gallivanting around on a cruising boat with parents who were in it for the adventure (and were circumnavigating on a Cal25 of all f'in things before she was born!) probably had something to do with that.

Speaking of channels which get zilch for views in interesting places: I stumbled across Wilds & Waters, who were cruising around the outside passage in BC and filming some of the much lesser-visited islands out that way. Good production values, minimum of chatting at the camera, interesting locations. They were barely cracking 2k a video, but now they're off to Mexico so perhaps the inevitable turn to schlock is incoming. :(
 
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TwoLegged

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Jesus H Christ! Just when I started to think I missed old Two Legged, she goes off on not one but two multi-paragraph lectures about the Scottish Highlands! Will there be a quiz at 11? But hey, I did learn a useful new word today - twazzock. Thanks TL.
Actually, one post was about the surge in face-to-camera advertising by Sailing Vloggers, and the other was about listening to the substance of your critics' comments rather than snowflaking for five years after making them angry.

And the word "twazzock" is from Dylan. I first heard it in a lovely video where he took his Minstrel way way inland up some East Anglia river, and described some village as being full of "second-home owning TWAZZOCKS". I loved the word, but I doubt that any of us could deploy it as magnificently as Dylan did there.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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Canada
To me, the Pacific is totally "next level" sailing. It seems far more vast, far more hostile, more wild.

Growing up on the east coast of the US, I get that point of view. It actually felt a bit liberating to move away from what I feel is a clusterfuck of overpopulation, overdevelopment and relative lack of wild nature there. That, and it’s very flat.
 

2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
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Minneapolis area
The whole digital advertising ecosystem is an incestuous ponzi scheme which doesn’t generate any meaningful revenue for the client but still sucks so much money out of them that it foundationally supports the entire modern internet. I’ve been expecting it to collapse any day now for a decade, hopefully the coming revelation that everyone pulling advertising campaigns from Twitter resulted in zero change to their sales is the poison pill for it all.
It is tempting to think that way.

The problem is that advertising does actually work. Why else would anybody by Marlboros, Vagisil Scentsitive Scents Feminine Dry Wash Deodorant Spray, or Coco Puffs? These are all products that would have failed in the marketplace but for advertising campaigns that not only promoted them but created a market that did not exist.

Advertising impact is easy to measure and while mistakes are sometimes made marketing dollars do not flow unless there are results.
 

TheDragon

Super Anarchist
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East central Illinois
Holly's channel has really opened my mind up to the Pacific. The people seem to be uniformly the most gracious, kind and welcoming folks you could imagine.

Is it truly more "peaceful" there? Fewer storms? I think the cyclone season is exactly the same as the Atlantic hurricane season.

Anyway, of all the You Tubers out there, I think Wind Hippie may be the one I admire the most. Really admirable courage and determination.
At least in my experience it was truly "peaceful" on the Pacific. I had two rough days in the doldrums after leaving Panama Bay headed to the Galapagos (big thunderstorms). Then when leaving French Polynesia I misjudged the forecast and got myself into a "maramu" which is what they call it when a large strong high pressure zone travels south of the trade wind belt, and the anticlockwise flow around it reinforces the SE trades so they blow over 30 knots. Leaving one day later would have avoided it. But otherwise I had no conditions over about 25 knots, and no storms. Everyone is painfully aware of the cyclone season, and either heads south to New Zealand or Australia, or north to Indonesia, etc., or stays back in French Polynesia which rarely gets a cyclone, or like me leaves their boat in Vuda Point Marina in Fiji which is considered "cyclone-proof" if you pay to have your boat put in a trench in the ground, or "cyclone-resistant" if you leave it in the water in their special "cove". A few bold souls continue to sail around Fiji, but close to Vuda Point so they can hussle back if a cyclone threatens. A cyclone hits parts of Fiji almost every summer, Cyclone Winston in 2016 did enormous damage, wiping out entire marinas, so folks are very wary.
 

Jim in Halifax

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Cool to see the old Elvestrom PFD in the thumbnail. I remember I had a couple of those when the only other choice for dinghy sailors was bulky kapok or neck-braking keyhole life jackets.
 

Munz

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Everyone is painfully aware of the cyclone season, and either heads south to New Zealand or Australia, or north to Indonesia, etc., or stays back in French Polynesia which rarely gets a cyclone, or like me leaves their boat in Vuda Point Marina in Fiji which is considered "cyclone-proof" if you pay to have your boat put in a trench in the ground, or "cyclone-resistant" if you leave it in the water in their special "cove". A few bold souls continue to sail around Fiji, but close to Vuda Point so they can hussle back if a cyclone threatens. A cyclone hits parts of Fiji almost every summer, Cyclone Winston in 2016 did enormous damage, wiping out entire marinas, so folks are very wary.

Am heading that way soon, Gambiers, Marquises and possibly parts of the Tuamotus are generally viewed as safe, but what about the Societies? I kinda get the impression quite a few of the less risk adverse boats spend the season in the water (especially around Tahiti) keeping an eye on the forecast or is it only the real chancers (like down in Fiji) that do this?
 

TheDragon

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East central Illinois
Intrepid Sam Holmes, having left his boat in Europe for the winter, is messing around Southwest Florida in a free beach cat. Long but interesting, earlier Vlogs show acquisition and modification of the cat, and before that footage of the Hurricane Ian Damage to Fort Myers.

 

TheDragon

Super Anarchist
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East central Illinois
Am heading that way soon, Gambiers, Marquises and possibly parts of the Tuamotus are generally viewed as safe, but what about the Societies? I kinda get the impression quite a few of the less risk adverse boats spend the season in the water (especially around Tahiti) keeping an eye on the forecast or is it only the real chancers (like down in Fiji) that do this?
The Societies have occasionally had a cyclone, rest of FP is pretty safe, last serious ones were in the early 1980s. There are certainly some who stick around the Societies sailing the summer away, but only a few. There are several options for haulout and land storage, but all were fully booked for cyclone season when I was looking this past season. Those islands are all pretty close to each other and so it is only a day's sailing to get from one to another of the five main ones to look for shelter, but cyclone force winds howling around those hills would be scary, just hanging on a mooring or worse my anchor in a maramu in Borabora was pretty hectic, dragging anchor twice in gusts coming off the hills. In the Tuamotus there is a haulout facility on one of the atolls, called Apataki, where lots of folks leave their boats for the cyclone season and as far as I know it has never been hit. One guy I met and got to know reasonably well had kept his boat there for a decade, sailing the Tuamotus each winter season for six months, what a life! I don't believe the Marquesas have ever had a cyclone pass through.
 

Kris Cringle

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The royal family made a quick trip through Boston this week. Some of the local lack of enthusiasm was blamed on our Irish ancestry.

Whatever. I have little use for the monarchy but nothing against the 'family'. It does seem a little awkward right now.

UK'ers; What's the future of your monarchy now that the king is on the throne?

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Jud - s/v Sputnik

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And speaking of YouTubers, on my trip this past season I had one direct and one indirect encounter. First up was SV Delos, who turned up at Shelter Bay the same week I did. I met them at the pool and they were a little standoffish, but that's to be expected given probably everyone wants to know them.

Such a weird phenomenon, celebrity. Why would anyone want to know them simply b/c they’re sailors with a YT channel. Frankly, I think I’d be the opposite - but maybe anti-celebrity is weird too.
 

TwoLegged

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UK'ers; What's the future of your monarchy now that the king is on the throne?
Thoughts from a neighbour of the UK:

The Brits are fed an intense diet of monarchist propaganda, so their monarchy is safe for a while. But Charles is much less liked than his late mother, so the hope seems to be that is more popular son William will rescue the show.

However, the UK is now in a phase of steep economic decline, which is recalibrating a lot of political assumptions.

Also, it is likely that within a decade Scotland will be independent and Ireland will be reunited. Support for Welsh independence is now at the levels seen in Scotland before 2014, and the long odds there are shortening.

It's unclear how the monarchy will adapt to a shrunken Kingdom of England. The recent dose of racism from a Lady in Waiting won't help.
 




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