Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

dylan winter

Super Anarchist
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When my wife and I left on our first long sailing trip to Mexico and points south (we were in our late 20's) both sets of parents were out there in their respective boats. Each called on the VHF to wish us well. My wife's and her dad were both snuffling and crying and saying goodbye like it was the last time they would ever see each other...

My dad takes his turn "OK - have fun and be safe. Hope it all goes well". That was it. It helped that I had trained them by doing lots of wilderness travel from a pretty young age. I'm sure they figured I'd bite it on one trip or another.
sounds like an english dad.

I was the last of four boys - all went to a state run boarding school. Packed off at 11.

they were a bit worried when the oldest went to the states and Canada with a 99 day /99 dollar bus ticket - but by the time it came to me they could not give a hoot about where I was going or what I was doing. All they wanted to know was that I would try to get home for christmas.

For a while there were four of us boys hanging around my parents place at weekends where the racing dinghies were based.

we all had shit old cars - we all had girlfriends - all with shit old cars as well . Ten cars in the garden at times. It was a close run thing getting getting them started for work on sunday or monday.

The jump leads hung on a hook by the front door with the coats.
 

Kris Cringle

Super Anarchist
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My father told me when I was growing up that "life is not a vacation". I think I spent the rest of my life trying to prove him wrong. lol. I think he stopped worrying about me now. :D
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Ajax

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Edgewater, MD
@Bagheera Ok, I've taken the time to read the Sail article about your boat. That is an incredible story. Rarely are people so driven and focused at such a young age.

Your boat is way, way more serious than I expected. I think you've even exceeded @estarzinger 's Hawk in the expeditionary specifications. I don't think he specifically ice-reinforced his hull but there are a lot of similarities in your builds. He chose a Van De Stadt Samoa 47 (if I recall).

You're doing some real National Geographic type work that really should be documented. Your work shouldn't be wasted on the troglodytes of Youtube though, it should be on educational TV channels or in movie theaters.

Hmm... you know, I just might know of a guy. He is a producer and sailed to the Antarctic and went ashore, documenting the entire trip. He can serve as functional crew as well as documentarian. I'll ping him and see if I can connect you two.
 

estarzinger

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@Bagheera I don't think he specifically ice-reinforced his hull but there are a lot of similarities in your builds.
We added a whole lot of extra framing, and a section of thicker plate in the bow/forefoot area, but our design objective was just 'excellent performance with ability for light summer ice', certainly not wintering over (although we did winter in the beagle, but the ice did not get much more than a couple cms). Bagheera is rather stronger. The doubled frame spacing does strengthen the skin, but my main objective was to make the boat so stiff that you could never measure any hull deflection in any direction even with full backstay. Hull flex is an enemy of offshore boat longevity.

We had quite a bit of build flexibility because the boat was designed to have quite thick (16mm I think) teak decks, which we did not put on (just non-skid paint). About 1/3 of that weight we put into the extra frames and plate, 1/3 into a bulb on the keel and kept 1/3 in hand to cover 'cruising stuff weight'. She floated on her lines when fully loaded, which is unusual for a live aboard cruising boat.
 
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Bagheera

Member
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Alaska
Your boat is way, way more serious than I expected. I think you've even exceeded @estarzinger 's Hawk in the expeditionary specifications. I don't think he specifically ice-reinforced his hull but there are a lot of similarities in your builds. He chose a Van De Stadt Samoa 47 (if I recall).
I never met Evans, but we have exchanged a few messages on a few occasions.
Hawk sailed through the North West Passage with the new owner in the same year and same direction as we did with Bagheera, we met a few times in various ports and anchorages. Hawk now has a home base in Kodiak, just a few days sail from where we live and we see her pretty much every year. Unfortunately the boat is not really used anymore, which is a bit sad to see.
There are indeed a lot of similarities, as are in a lot of boats that are specifically built for use in the high latitudes. The interesting thing is that a lot of people make a custom boat with pretty much the exact same list of 'wants' and 'would like to haves', but the end result is totally different.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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Bagheera specs in a nutshell...

Here an article that my wife and I wrote a few years ago:

Thanks for these, Bagheera! Incredible story. Out of curiosity, unless it’s too personal of a question, what’s the rough cost for a custom build and outfit like this (I’m aware you did a large amount/most of the work yourself!). Was this a full-time 40-hour-week project? How else to accomplish such a huge task?!

Funny - I never knew that about the black and yellow colour scheme. From your build article in Sail mag: “After reading various articles on visibility of yachts at sea, we concluded that the topsides of the hull should be a dark color and the deck a bright one. Studies have shown that dark-colored hulls are more visible from the bridge of a ship in bad weather, while a bright, contrasting color shows better from the air in case of an SAR mission. We opted for black and yellow.”

When I bought my boat, built in Quebec and cruised to Labrador by the previous owner (where they hit a a rock in an partially uncharted fjord, putting a large dent in the leading edge of the heel ballast), it had this colour scheme, which I wasn’t fond of - mostly the actual paint design/layout. (Your hull and deck look great!) The seller told me it was a preferred colour for visibility in high latitudes (but what the hell were they thinking with that green?!? :) ), which I’d never heard before. (We also had a dark deck, with grey Vetus non-skid pads glued on deck, which was painted white.) But the deck non-skid was peeling off and the paint was very old; in any case, it’s not a practical colour scheme/deck style for these latitudes (N49*, west coast of Canada), as it got too hot in summer, so I’ve re-done the hull and deck paint/non-skid. (I also like having only a single l hull paint colour to maintain.). High latitudes await one day, but I doubt I’d re-do the paint and deck for that :).

Would love to “hitch a ride” on Bagheera one day and learn more about the “region”, what it takes to be there.

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Bagheera

Member
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Alaska
Out of curiosity, unless it’s too personal of a question, what’s the rough cost for a custom build and outfit like this (I’m aware you did a large amount/most of the work yourself!). Was this a full-time 40-hour-week project?
If Bagheera would have been a yard-built boat, you'd probably be looking at somewhere around a million. If it was yard-built I would have opted for aluminium as that is a less maintenance. The cost difference in material is easily eaten up by the very expensive 2 part paints that you need to make a steel hull somewhat close to maintenance free. The reason that I used steel was the fact that the boat had to be build outside. I certainly did not have the budget at that age to rent a place for the duration of the build to be able to use alu (you can't weld alu in the open air).

We did all the work ourselves, the hull, the rigging, electrical, systems, interior. sand blasting, painting etc. I even made the sails myself. My father is a (now retired) boat builder and he helped a lot with the building of the hull. Total amount of hours that we put into the boat was probably somewhere around 6500 though I never did any book keeping on this so it is not more than a wild guess. We both had full time jobs and the hull was built during weekends and evenings. Once the hull was in the water I quit my job and build the interior and systems over the course of 2 winters. The first season with the boat was with an Ikea interior screwed to the floor boards while we sailed the boat from Europe to Canada. In Canada I finished the boat in that second winter and buggered off to Greenland early that spring.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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:D I've done a lot of Beckey routes. Usually the first and most obvious line on a given formation; seldom the best line. The man did love a dank 5.5 squeeze chimney. You can see it from the ground, and it's certain it goes.
Ah, but always remember, however, that Beckey did them first. :) And with primitive gear and clothing...(some of the early film footage in “Dirtbag” is amazing -and his account of his two-month ascent of Mt. Waddington, the second ascent, is extraordinary...(I’d forgotten he was only 19 at the time, in 1943)...after passing crampon-able ice and snow areas on the mountain, he wore felt “pullovers” over tennis shoes to get a grip on wet alpine slab...)
 
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2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
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Minneapolis area
I'm 50 now and retirement is in the target reticle. Part of me says "Do what all the other retirees are doing and go to the Caribbean." The other part of me says "risk your life, do things that few other people are doing." At the very least, I need to sail to Newfoundland. My little plastic boat will make it.
T.S. Elliot wrote that old men ought to be explorers.
 
@Jud - s/v Sputnik that is an extremely cool looking vessel in its own right, custom one-off design? What’s the story behind it?

Dirtbag jolted me hard out of my own dirtbag climber phase. I came out of the VIMFF showing thinking “this is a cautionary tale about the long-term dangers of an obsessive lifestyle at the expense of all else” and eventually stopped chasing the dragon of living out of a van and climbing full time. I had much the same reaction when I watched The Sailor, about the life of Paul Erling Johnson, but for some reason that extremely sad story wasn’t sufficient to quell the madness for the sea…
 

toddster

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The Gorge
we all had shit old cars - we all had girlfriends - all with shit old cars as well . Ten cars in the garden at times. It was a close run thing getting getting them started for work on sunday or monday.

The jump leads hung on a hook by the front door with the coats.
In grad skool, in Michigan, in the winter, those of us with dubious vehicles would take the batteries out and carry them into the lab and leave them charging in the chemical fume hood during the work day. In and out, briefcase in one hand, car battery in the other.
 

Ajax

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Edgewater, MD
Unfortunately the boat is not really used anymore, which is a bit sad to see.
I read this and it really pisses me off. When I learned that Hawk was going up for sale, I told me wife that we should pull the ejection handle on conventional society, buy Hawk and GTFO.

I told her yesterday that Hawk isn't getting much use and she cringed, knowing that I was right.
 

Jud - s/v Sputnik

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Canada
@Jud - s/v Sputnik that is an extremely cool looking vessel in its own right, custom one-off design? What’s the story behind it?

Dirtbag jolted me hard out of my own dirtbag climber phase. I came out of the VIMFF showing thinking “this is a cautionary tale about the long-term dangers of an obsessive lifestyle at the expense of all else” and eventually stopped chasing the dragon of living out of a van and climbing full time. I had much the same reaction when I watched The Sailor, about the life of Paul Erling Johnson, but for some reason that extremely sad story wasn’t sufficient to quell the madness for the sea…

Yeah, the one thing that I admire most about Beckey’s very strange lifestyle, was his extreme commitment to not sitting on the couch. Well....it’s all very complicated, isn’t it, especially not having the funds to get up and go, and boats taking lots of attention and money, it can be quite easy to get obsessive about it all, for sure...yeah, I saw a trailer for ‘The Sailor’ and it somehow made me want to avoid the Caribbean, a dying ground for old sun and salt-withered alcoholic sailors forever landbound, gone troppo :)

My boat is a now-much modified and not-sailed-enough Gilbert Caroff designed Chatam 33. Built in Quebec. Stay tuned for the glorious YouTube channel, updated just a few times a year, if I get around to it, called “Sailing When I Can” :).

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estarzinger

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I read this and it really pisses me off. When I learned that Hawk was going up for sale, I told me wife that we should pull the ejection handle on conventional society, buy Hawk and GTFO.

I told her yesterday that Hawk isn't getting much use and she cringed, knowing that I was right.
damn, @Ajax I wish you had told me that - I would have sold her to you for a song. We were more looking for a good owner than for money. Hawk's owner is a professional ship engineer who seemed to understand and appreciate what we had tried to do with the boat, and he started off well with her. Unfortunately, both of our cruising boats have had less fortunate experiences with their subsequent owners. I have just accepted that they are out of my hands now, but it still occasionally makes me a bit sad.
 

2airishuman

The Loyal Opposition
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487
Minneapolis area
I'm 50 now and retirement is in the target reticle. Part of me says "Do what all the other retirees are doing and go to the Caribbean."
Other retirees are, as a rule, watching ESPN 48 weeks a year, and choosing a Carnival cruise because Carnival is for younger, more energetic people, like them.

My mother is almost 87 and got in a crash last week on her ATV; she hit a minivan. She is being a complete pain in the ass in the hospital while recovering from broken ribs, broken back, broken neck, lots of bruising, and a black eye. Two years ago she was in the hospital as a result of injuries sustained while chasing one of her sled dogs that had gotten off its post. She likes sailing but does not go the Caribbean. I believe she makes good life choices overall but am adding a rearview mirror to her ATV.

Comfort is a slow, boring, and unremarkable death
 

Zonker

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Canada
Unfortunately, both of our cruising boats have had less fortunate experiences with their subsequent owners. I have just accepted that they are out of my hands now, but it still occasionally makes me a bit sad.
Sort of the same with us. First boat got sold in Annapolis and trucked to a lake in Kentucky. EVENTUAL plan for the owner was to sail down to Gulf of Mexico and beyond. Wouldn't have been surprised in the least if it's still in a lake.

Second boat was sold near PV, Mexico to a couple of LA entertainment lawyers. We had accidently left the Iridium Go tracking turned on so it was entertaining to see it spend a day doing circles somewhere west of Baja for a day when perhaps something went wrong as they were bringing it back to LA.

We did not have happy feelings for them because they were a week late closing the deal - which affected us financially as we were closing on a condo the same week and the money from the boat sale was part of the down payment. Grrr.

At the end of the day a boat is just a thing, even if you have great memories of it. Once it's sold it's somebody else's boat and you should let it go. Of course that didn't stop me patting both of them goodbye.
 

tane

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...At the end of the day a boat is just a thing, even if you have great memories of it. Once it's sold it's somebody else's boat and you should let it go. Of course that didn't stop me patting both of them goodbye.
Absolutely!!!
Cling to the memories, not the "thing"!
 
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