Greatest Invention Since Sliced Bread

Ed Lada

Super Anarchist
20,013
5,582
Poland
The high point bottle I would put up there from my more limited experience is a 1936 Chateau Mouton Rothschild. The explosion of flavors was (and is) unforgettable.

Was the Petrus all you hoped for?

So perhaps wine should really bump sliced bread down the list at least one notch.
I've had a few bottles of Mouton Rothschild from the 1980s. It is a wonderful wine, as are all of them in that class. Some vintages are incredible but none of them are ever bad. The Petrus was absolutely marvelous, it's probably the one wine from Bordeaux that can age for 100 years. It doesn't even begin to be great until about 50 years. To the right on my shelf is a bottle of 1928 Cheval Blanc. We drank that last year. It smelled like Cheval Blanc. it tasted like Cheval Blanc but the color had faded and it looked like a Rosé. I have drunk more Cheval Blanc form various vintages than any other Bordeaux and I like it very much. However I would have to say the Bordeaux I like the best is Chateaux Margaux. It is delicate on the nose and in the mouth but then you realize how subtly powerful and structured it really is. Amazing. Laffite Rothschild is similar to that I think.

I've never had a really great Burgundy, but the no name ones good ones I've had are amazing. I would love to try a great year from La Tâche however the prices for those go into the 10s of thousands of euros which is insane.

Yes, I think that a great wine is even better than sliced bread. But sliced bread is a little more affordable, so it has that going for it.
 

boomer

Super Anarchist
16,873
1,903
PNW
Chill the Champaign before opening.
My daughter and her husband work in the wine industry. Her husband a lawyer, who worked in all aspects of the industry for 18 years is a manager for a well known vintar. My daughter for who in the past worked for seven different quality vintars, working her way up the food chain in the Napa Wine Industry, had her own company Ullage Consulting promoting vineyards product lineup, as well as various Napa Valley's Sparkling WIne Houses products, till she was lured away recently by $$$$ for another high end Vintage Vintar.

I don't drink wine or sparkling wine, nor know much about wine or sparkling wine, other then storing the bottles. Chilling wine or champagne in our cellar, which my daughter has us do when she ships cases before arriving in the PNW from Napa Valley.

Champagne can be cellared for a significant amount of time, provided that it is stored in the correct conditions. Champagne is a wine that benefits from aging, and can develop greater depth and complexity as it matures. With proper storage, Champagne can be cellared for 10-15 years or even longer.

The key to cellaring Champagne is to keep it in a cool, dark, and steady environment. The ideal storage temperature for Champagne is between 45-50 degrees Fahrenheit. Humidity levels should be kept between 50-70%, to prevent the wine from drying out or developing mold.

The wine should also be kept in a horizontal position, to prevent the cork from drying out and allowing oxygen to enter the bottle. If you are planning on cellaring Champagne for a long period of time, it is important to invest in a good quality storage system.

A wine refrigerator or wine cellar is the best option, as they will provide the ideal storage conditions for wine. However, if you do not have access to a wine fridge or cellar, you can store your Champagne in a cool, dark closet or basement. When cellaring Champagne, it is important to check on the wine periodically to make sure that it is still in good condition. If you notice any changes in the color or taste of the wine, it is time to drink it. Champagne can be cellared for a significant amount of time, provided that it is stored in the correct conditions.

Unopened bottles of champagne are safe for three to four years for non-vintage Champagne and five to ten years for vintage Champagne. In most cases, as they age, champagnes will become more golden, and some may also lose their effervescence. Vintage Champagne has the potential to be kept in good condition for up to 20 years.

Ullage Consulting
 
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Se7en

Super Anarchist
1,551
641
Melbourne
I doubt that the old famous chateaux in France will be switching to Stelvin closures or any other cork replacement anytime soon.
These are the same winemakers who's wines are regularly being outclassed by new world vineyards? I'm not sure that the quality of the wine is the reason that they are sticking with cork.
I admit to liking the romance of pulling a cork and wondering what you will get. The little ceremony. But there are no benefits beyond 'tradition' for cork, and many for stelvin closures.

It's not just TCA, there is also a higher incidence of brettanomyces with cork, not to mention simple failure to seal. I made the mistake of taking just one bottle away with me for a significant birthday (it was the third or fourth of 6 I had stored for ~15 years). Arguably one of the top wines from Australias best most expensive winemaker. Pulled the capsule, only to see the dreaded sparkling sign of wine that had come past the cork. It went into a stew. 4 others have been perfect, I have one left.

Using cork nowdays just signals to me that the winemaker cares more about their romance and tradition than they do about the wine.
 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
27,778
4,194
Suwanee River
I've never truly liked white wine. (nor Champagne) This is not to say that I haven't had enjoyable meals with white wine/Champagne as the beverage. I've always been more of a robust red wine kind of guy. A good Zinfandel with a lot of black currant, or a dark Pinot noir from the nasty parts of No.Cal. and Oregon are my favorites. Sonoma produces some very good Merlots (I know, a blaspheme!)
I will eat any decent seafood dish with a good Zin, or Pinot before I would even uncork any white wine.
(And for you heathens, real Zinfandel is not pink!)
 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
27,778
4,194
Suwanee River
These are the same winemakers who's wines are regularly being outclassed by new world vineyards? I'm not sure that the quality of the wine is the reason that they are sticking with cork.
I admit to liking the romance of pulling a cork and wondering what you will get. The little ceremony. But there are no benefits beyond 'tradition' for cork, and many for stelvin closures.

It's not just TCA, there is also a higher incidence of brettanomyces with cork, not to mention simple failure to seal. I made the mistake of taking just one bottle away with me for a significant birthday (it was the third or fourth of 6 I had stored for ~15 years). Arguably one of the top wines from Australias best most expensive winemaker. Pulled the capsule, only to see the dreaded sparkling sign of wine that had come past the cork. It went into a stew. 4 others have been perfect, I have one left.

Using cork nowdays just signals to me that the winemaker cares more about their romance and tradition than they do about the wine.
I can't tell you the number of times I've put a cork screw through a screw on cap on an exceptionally good bottle of Pinot noir.
 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
7,256
4,508
Bay Area, CA
I grew up(???) in a big old draughty Isle of Wight stone house with an enormous cellar. Several of my Dad's elderly patients would send him a 'little something' as a thank-you for 'sorting out my gall bladder problem' or whatever.

A case of 1935 Latour. A case of 1953 Chateau Margaux. A case of 1963 Dow's port.

I was so spoiled as a young man. For formal dinner parties, Dad and I would descend to the cellars in the morning and carefully bring up the bottles for the evening, and carefully decant them for dinner.

Nectar of the gods!
 

P_Wop

Super Anarchist
7,256
4,508
Bay Area, CA
There are still some bottles of the '63 Dow's rescued by my siblings in London. They had some at Christmas, and said they were perfect. I'm just so pissed that I'm medically not allowed to fly. I would have slurped a glass or two with immense joy. Hey, ho.
 

Se7en

Super Anarchist
1,551
641
Melbourne
I'm just so pissed that I'm medically not allowed to fly. I would have slurped a glass or two with immense joy. Hey, ho.
Sorry - that sucks.
I shared a bottle of 1998 E&E black pepper shiraz with my father a few years ago. He declared it the best wine he had ever drunk. I had 4 left, and looked forward to sharing them with him over time. (We live in different states and only see each other a few times a year)
In the middle of moving house, some people broke into our house and gave it a very thorough going over, selectively taking things of high value. Of the ~50 odd bottles of wine I had in that house, they took about 8, including those 4. That really pissed me off. Wine can represent more than just something nice to drink.

(they also stole the steering wheel from my sports car. Nothing else, just the steering wheel. And were careful removing it. What sort of person does that?)
 
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Snaggletooth

SA's Morrelle Compasse
35,259
6,109
(they also stole the steering wheel from my sports car. Nothing else, just the steering wheel. And were careful removing it. What sort of person does that?)
sombodey who haded cased the joite, an inside job.......
 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
27,778
4,194
Suwanee River
Sorry - that sucks.
I shared a bottle of 1998 E&E black pepper shiraz with my father a few years ago. He declared it the best wine he had ever drunk. I had 4 left, and looked forward to sharing them with him over time. (We live in different states and only see each other a few times a year)
In the middle of moving house, some people broke into our house and gave it a very thorough going over, selectively taking things of high value. Of the ~50 odd bottles of wine I had in that house, they took about 8, including those 4. That really pissed me off. Wine can represent more than just something nice to drink.

(they also stole the steering wheel from my sports car. Nothing else, just the steering wheel. And were careful removing it. What sort of person does that?)
The kind of person who intends to come back another time and take the rest of it.
Thieves dismantled parts of my mother's sports car one night. Steering wheel, center console, gear shift, and wheel locks so I couldn't take the wheels off to change the tires a few months later. Police speculated that the (not too bright) thieves were trying to make sure that the car would still be there when they came back for the rest of it.
 

Steam Flyer

Sophisticated Yet Humble
46,697
10,891
Eastern NC
Dad as a surgeon had just two iron-clad rules at home.

1. No motorcycles
2. No smoking

He spent a lot of his life fixing problems that those two had caused.

With specific regard to wine (or other fine drink) and food, smoking literally destroys the sense of taste. The sensor cells in the nerve endings in your mouth and nose are curling up and dying. And it dulls the sensation such that the smoker doesn't realize it.

I smoked for a few years, mostly in the military and right after. I cut down to 1 or 2 cigarettes a day, which I didn't particularly enjoy other than as a nicotine dosage "to relax." Then Mrs Steam, who quit smoking completely before we even met, encouraged me to stop totally. It was amazing as my sense of smell returned and I hung around co-workers who smoked were oblivious. I suppose in some ways it's a blessing to kill off your sense of smell, depending on the surrounding environment....
 

boomer

Super Anarchist
16,873
1,903
PNW
I'd tell my people to use their touch, eyes, ears, nose and taste - nose and taste because of industrial fuel and gas and fumes, can displace oxygen, creating an oxygen depleted environment, as they learned in Confined Spaces: Entry and Egress, requiring testing and monitoring the safe oxygen levels. Some but not all smells, can be tasted and smelt.

Then I'd tell them never ever to ignore their sixth sense, when they feel something weird or dangerous is about to happen, then remove the restrictions that could be impairing their senses and look about to see what setting off the bells and alarms in their sixth sense. Hearing when ones vision is obscured, can tell one a lot about what's happening around them, don't ignore those weird sounds or feelings. Security is a state of mind and your bodyguard is your mind. If one fails to grasp this simple and fundamental rule, one can quickly find oneself the victim.

Foss Launch & Tug Company ("Foss"), owner of 202, delivered 202 to Todd's floating drydock on for routine service, the annual inspection required by law and such repairs as were indicated by the inspection. 202 was out of the water on blocks in Todd's drydock. At approximately 7:45 p. m. Stanley Olsen, in the course of his aforementioned inspection duties, entered tank A421f and collapsed due to its oxygen-deficient atmosphere. Robert Olsen and Allen Uglem, who had been working nearby, then entered the tank to effect a rescue. They too collapsed. Allen Uglem did not recover; Robert and Stanley Olsen did. This was a classic "confined space incident' where the oxygen levels weren't tested for a safe working environment.





Most everyone knows carbon monoxide can cause sudden illness and death if inhaled. Carbon Monoxide has a density about the same as air and is created by numerous combustion processes. Carbon monoxide is the most common cause of fatal air poisoning.

Carbon Dioxide is an invisible, odorless gas with a density heavier-than-air. Perhaps surprisingly, it is toxic to both humans and wildlife. Carbon Dioxide is commonly used to provide bubbles in carbonated drinks and beer. The use of high volume and high-pressure containers to store Carbon Dioxide for beverage dispensing has created an oxygen deprivation hazard for many food and beverage industry employees as well as first responders. All facilities with high-capacity Carbon Dioxide systems should consider the hazard to their employees and initiate protections to mitigate the hazard.

Ammonia is a colorless gas with a pungent, irritating smell. It is lighter-than-air. Ammonia is used as a building block for the production of many industrial and pharmaceutical products and common in cleaning products. Ammonia fumes are toxic at low levels and explosive at higher levels.

Chlorine is a heavier-than-air gas with a yellow-green color. It is extremely reactive and corrosive. It is used to create many disinfectants and bleaches. It is commonly added to swimming pools to keep them sanitary. It is very dangerous, poisonous, and toxic for all living organisms.


Hydrogen Sulfide is a colorless gas with the strong smell of rotten eggs. It is very corrosive, heavier-than-air, and highly toxic. Above 1000ppm, death is nearly instantaneous. At lower levels (700-1000 ppm), victims experience rapid unconsciousness, knockdown or immediate collapse within 1 to 2 breaths, breathing stops and death within minutes. Workers are especially at risk of exposure when working in confined spaces like municipal sewers, pits, manholes and tunnels. Hydrogen Sulfide is produced naturally from decaying organic matter like sewage sludge, liquid manure as well as with natural gas. Hydrogen Sulfide is a dangerous component or byproduct of many industrial processes including petroleum production and refining, textile manufacturing and even food processing.

Refrigerants are gases used in various compressors to provide space cooling. The most common refrigerants are fluorinated hydrocarbons. These gases are commonly referred to by the brand name “Freon”. Difluorodichloromethane is a colorless gas with a faint delicate odor. It is usually shipped as a liquid confined under its own vapor pressure. Contact with the unconfined liquid can cause frostbite. The components are noncombustible but can asphyxiate by the displacement of air. HVAC service professionals commonly experience refrigerant exposure and a mild exposure is usually harmless. However, exposure in a confined space can lead to headaches, nausea, and vomiting and severe poisoning can lead to a loss of consciousness and death.

Hydrogen Fluoride is a colorless liquid at room temperature. Hydrogen fluoride is used in the production of aluminum and chlorofluorocarbons, and in the glass etching and chemical industries. When it mixes with water, it becomes Hydrofluoric Acid -a very dangerous acid. When released at high concentration as a liquid, it fumes in air. Acute (short-term) inhalation exposure to gaseous hydrogen fluoride can cause severe respiratory damage in humans, including severe irritation and pulmonary edema. Severe ocular irritation and dermal burns may occur following eye or skin exposure in humans.
 


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