Greek charter /EU charter

kent_island_sailor

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Kent Island!
We might be wanting to do this, but it seems like Greece and the rest of the EU want some kind of certificate from US Sailing. There is NFW  I am going to be taking any US Sailing courses, it would end up costing more than the charter besides for likely having been sailing offshore long before the instructor was born :rolleyes:

Is there any way around this BS? No one in the Caribbean cared about this stuff once they found out my experience level.

 

Fah Kiew Tu

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We might be wanting to do this, but it seems like Greece and the rest of the EU want some kind of certificate from US Sailing. There is NFW  I am going to be taking any US Sailing courses, it would end up costing more than the charter besides for likely having been sailing offshore long before the instructor was born :rolleyes:

Is there any way around this BS? No one in the Caribbean cared about this stuff once they found out my experience level.
Scanner and colour laser printer. Problem solved.

FKT

 

Dogscout

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I'm gonna bet that its the insurance companies who are requiring this of the Charter Companies.  They want some manner of documented instruction.  An ICC, RYA or ASA document will do that.  

But lets think about this as having to produce a document when asked.  Does your local Yacht club or even a local sailing club have any sort of class where a certificate is issued?  Can you knock that out on a weekend?  

Conversely you could ask the charter company if they will do an Interview/check-out prior to sailing.

You will also want a Radio Operators License.  Charter companies ask for that one too.  Its easy to get from the FCC.  

 

European Bloke

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It's not just the insurers. I'm not sure about Greece but some countries require it as well. For example when you enter Croatia they check those documents.

As mentioned the ICC send to be the easiest to get without taking a lot of expensive time consuming courses.

It's not the same as the Caribbean, but it's not the Caribbean.

 

leuk

Member
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Brittany
Med mooring can separate the men from the boys.
And boats in many parts, too. It's quite incredible that in 2020, anyone with no sailing experience whatsoever could still rent a 40 ft + yacht and wreak havok in marinas.

edit : what am I saying. In that regard only, 2020 was quite safe, in fact.

 
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Ajax

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When backing in, how does one avoid fouling the keel and prop on the mooring pennant that you tie up the bow with?

Many videos I've seen, pack the boats cheek to jowl so you practically have to run over the pennant to get into your spot.

 

kent_island_sailor

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And boats in many parts, too. It's quite incredible that in 2020, anyone with no sailing experience whatsoever could still rent a 40 ft + yacht and wreak havok in marinas.

edit : what am I saying. In that regard only, 2020 was quite safe, in fact.
I get not wanting the boats wrecked and it would look WAY different to a person just starting out. Of course paying $$$$ for a week's cruising lessons is a good idea if you never sailed a boat before. Hell, I used to be the INSTRUCTOR on week cruises :rolleyes: Too bad we didn't need no stinking badges back then or I would have some paperwork to show someone.

BVIs - you own a boat, have sailed offshore, and sailed a 40 foot trimaran at 25 knots? Well OK then, your boat is over there have fun. It wasn't like they would just give out the boats to anyone, but there wasn't a big deal about actual license type stuff.

 
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fufkin

Super Anarchist
I’ve been wondering about to the same thing...specifically if it’s an EU rule or is it on a company by company basis. I’ve done a couple of Moorings charters in the Caribbean and was thinking maybe that could suffice for a European based Moorings charter.

I suppose a phone call could clear that up but that would disturb my pattern of idle speculation.

 
We might be wanting to do this, but it seems like Greece and the rest of the EU want some kind of certificate from US Sailing. There is NFW  I am going to be taking any US Sailing courses, it would end up costing more than the charter besides for likely having been sailing offshore long before the instructor was born :rolleyes:

Is there any way around this BS? No one in the Caribbean cared about this stuff once they found out my experience level.
I know you won't like hearing this but, theres really no way around it. Just take your ASA 104 certification number to ASA's website. Go to the IPC page and apply for the license. It will come in about two weeks. If you don't have ASA 104 you could challenge it at an ASA facility. We do it. Take the written test and sail with an instructor for a day. Also, dig out your FCC license. They will want that. 

In the US, boating is not a licensed activity, but it is in Europe. Don't wait till the last minute. Bottom line is, they don't care how much experience you have.  It's a license and you will need it. 

 

kent_island_sailor

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Kent Island!
I know you won't like hearing this but, theres really no way around it. Just take your ASA 104 certification number to ASA's website. Go to the IPC page and apply for the license. It will come in about two weeks. If you don't have ASA 104 you could challenge it at an ASA facility. We do it. Take the written test and sail with an instructor for a day. Also, dig out your FCC license. They will want that. 

In the US, boating is not a licensed activity, but it is in Europe. Don't wait till the last minute. Bottom line is, they don't care how much experience you have.  It's a license and you will need it. 
They will be the first people to EVER look at my FCC license. I got it for flying to the Bahamas, but no one out there actually ever wanted to see it or my pilots license either. Or SCUBA cert for that matter, "You know how ta dive mon?" was about it.

Also looks easily like a $1,000 operation from some quick Google-Fu.

 
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slug zitski

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They have charter programs were you and a couple mates charter a boat for a week or so ....with an instructor , captain 

at the end of the week you get your ticket,  plus valuable inside knowledge on how to use the area facilities 

in Croatia I frequently come across these ticket , charter , cruises 

its possible this is available in greece

In  the Uk countless yachtmaster weeks in the Solent and out of Falmouth 

falmouth is a winner...great sailing and classic British instructional rigor 

with greece , only charter in the Ionian

the Aegean is wind blasted  and difficult to get 7 days out of a week 

off season rates for med charter are very good ...sept,  oct, nov 

springtime is constipated with boats out of water  for seasonal service 

 

leuk

Member
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Brittany
I get not wanting the boats wrecked and it would look WAY different to a person just starting out. Of course paying $$$$ for a week's cruising lessons is a good idea if you never sailed a boat before. Hell, I used to be the INSTRUCTOR on week cruises :rolleyes: Too bad we didn't need no stinking badges back then or I would have some paperwork to show someone.

BVIs - you own a boat, have sailed offshore, and sailed a 40 foot trimaran at 25 knots? Well OK then, your boat is over there have fun. It wasn't like they would just give out the boats to anyone, but there wasn't a big deal about actual license type stuff.
That's basically what happens in France now. No sailing license is required (and that's a good thing overall) but you might have to spend an hour at sea demonstrating your skills, before getting handed a boat. The pretext being for you to see if you like the boat. But you're observed. Nothing official though, and not all companies are applying the method. I actually thought it was the same in Greece.

So hey, come charter in France then! We need boats not wrecking stuff around, and we need money!

 

TwoLegged

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In the US, boating is not a licensed activity, but it is in some parts of Europe
FIFY.

Some parts of Europe require a licence. But others do not.

For example in the UK and Ireland, there is licensing of small boats only for commercial activities.  Small pleasure craft do not need licenses or registration, and nor do skippers.

So for example, if you have never set foot in a boat, you are still legally entitled to set out from an Irish port in a dodgy old Admirals Cupper or a homebuilt frankenboat or brand new Swan. Unless you have stolen the boat or are jumping bail, there is no legal problem.

Sadly, since Ireland joined the EU in 1973, the European tradition of licensing and regulating every human activity has infected Ireland, and lots of formerly unregulated activities are now controlled by the people who get their kicks out of making rules.   But mercifully they have not yet deprived us of the freedom to drown ourselves in crap boats or through our own maritime incompetence.

 

European Bloke

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FIFY.

Some parts of Europe require a licence. But others do not.

For example in the UK and Ireland, there is licensing of small boats only for commercial activities.  Small pleasure craft do not need licenses or registration, and nor do skippers.

So for example, if you have never set foot in a boat, you are still legally entitled to set out from an Irish port in a dodgy old Admirals Cupper or a homebuilt frankenboat or brand new Swan. Unless you have stolen the boat or are jumping bail, there is no legal problem.

Sadly, since Ireland joined the EU in 1973, the European tradition of licensing and regulating every human activity has infected Ireland, and lots of formerly unregulated activities are now controlled by the people who get their kicks out of making rules.   But mercifully they have not yet deprived us of the freedom to drown ourselves in crap boats or through our own maritime incompetence.
Well summed up. The odd charter firm may push for a certificate but most will go with experience and possibly a quick check sail.

West coast of Scotland in May/June would be fantastic. I think West Ireland would be as well, but I don't know it very well.

 
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Black Sox

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Well summed up. The odd charter firm may push for a certificate but most will go with experience and possibly a quick check sail.

West coast of Scotland in May/June would be fantastic. I think West Ireland would be as well, but I don't know it very well.
West of Ireland is gorgeous, has fewer ports than you might like. Also, there be dragons. And big hairy men. With sticks. 

 

TwoLegged

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West of Ireland is gorgeous, has fewer ports than you might like. Also, there be dragons. And big hairy men. With sticks. 
The west isn't so strong on ports, but it does have lots of fine anchorages.  Except for the west coast of County Clare, which is best avoided unless your idea of an idyllic anchorage looks like this.

So if you dream of something like Maine, where there is an average 4.71-inch gap between lobster restaurants with mooring balls and/or harbours, then the west will disappoint you. For that sort of stuff, stick to the south and south-west: Kinsale to Dingle has an endearingly crinkly coast with an abundance of safe havens equipped to exercise your credit card in return for posh nosh and fluids which make you feel strong.

But from Galway Bay to Lough Foyle, you have a decent choice of remote and rugged anchorages.  Some of them are real jewels, such as Clew Bay and Killary Harbour.  Treat yourself to the excellent Irish Cruising Club guides to the coasts.

As to the hairy men with sticks, @Black Sox is mistaken.  ;)   Hurling is mostly played in the south and east.  The remaining Fir Bolg mostly live in Fermanagh, which has no coast ... and the dragons are all in An Bhreatain Bheag, where they sing at rugby matches.

 

Dogscout

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On walkabout
When backing in, how does one avoid fouling the keel and prop on the mooring pennant that you tie up the bow with?

Many videos I've seen, pack the boats cheek to jowl so you practically have to run over the pennant to get into your spot.
Depends on where you are.  What I have experienced is town quays require you to use your own anchor at the bow and tie off at the stern.  Line up your boat about 3 boat lengths off the wall, drop anchor and let out plenty of chain.  This helps keep you backing straight and once you set you need to play out chain until you are close to the wall.  Tie off to the wall/quay and bring in chain until snug.

For profit marinas have Slime-Lines.  At the dock is a small dia line like 6mm that attaches to a sunken mooring line.  Back in and throw your stern lines to the marinaro on the dock making sure you set a few meters off of the dock.  once tied, power forward at just over idle.  The marinaro picks up the small line and pulls up the mooring line that is anchored and on the bottom.  You hook that with your boat hook and pull it up tight and fix it to your bow cleat.  Wear gloves, that sunken line is slimey and covered with jagged things.  Now power in reverse and tighten up your stern lines.  Done.

Now what is fun to watch is when the Russian Navy arrives.  6 vodka fueled burly guys on a rental cat.  They cross anchor chains, back in under way too much power and cannot keep it straight.  You do not want to be anywhere near them because of damage and late night music and drinking.

 
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