Gross Tonnage Rules?

Rusalka

Super Anarchist
1,463
0
Maine/NYC
A friend of mine, while doing the return trip from Antigua, had an interesting run-in with a cruise ship while at anchor.
http://www.cruisemates.com/articles/news/

http://www.theroyalgazette.com/apps/pbcs.d.../NEWS/105110052

Started me thinking, what kind of license does one need to pilot a cruise ship, and does the cruise line have a policy for handling an incident like this?

Anybody else face an attack of a killer sea condo?
If she was coming into port she was under the control of the harbor pilot.

Also, what solo said, don't anchor in the channel.

 

JAB

Member
91
0
To answer the question of what type of license, you would need a USCG Master's License, Unlimited Tonnage, or equivilant license for the country that the ship was flagged in. Also, even if the ship is "under the control of the harbor pilot" the Master is still responsible for the ship, and any damage that occurs.

I don't exactly recall the pilot's license requirements, but my guess would be USCG Masters License, Unlimited Tonnage, and a Piloting endorsement for the appropriate waters. (Or equivilant for non-US waters).

 

boston

Member
243
18
To answer Kittys' question, the pilot will usually have the equivelent to a USCG Masters License for Unlimited Tonnage Vessels upon Oceans.

However, this being said the pilot is a paid guide. Ultimate Responsiblity lies with the captain for the safe and seamanlike operation of his vessel. Under International Law damages incurred while under the command of the pilot are the resposibility of the capatain and by extension the company he is employed by. If the captain feels that the pilot is doing a poor job he has the authority to contermand and relieve the pilot on the spot.

As a point of interest; todays cruise ships are usually brought into port and docked by their captains. A pilot may be carried as required by local regulation, but more often than not, the captain is doing the actual ship handling.

 

us7070

Super Anarchist
10,263
284
It's not a very big channel, and given the enormous size of the ships that come in to St. George's, I wouldn't anchor anywhere near the channel.

 

us7070

Super Anarchist
10,263
284
"almost inside the channel" means "outside the channel" in my book.
A good point, but possibly an academic one...., after you've been chopped up by a prop bigger than your boat.

 

vouz etes ici

Super Anarchist
In the Chesapeake Bay we don't have many sea condos, but we do have lots of large commercial traffic -- container ships, car carriers, and tugs.

If you ever want to hear pure mayhem, monitor Channel 13 on the VHF during the Annpolis to Solomons race or the Gov. Cup. Both races are at night and usually have 200+ boats all heading in the same direction. The Pilots and tug captains are always surprised to see all these sailboats heading for them as they head up the Bay to Baltimore despite the notice to mariners that informs them of the race... every year at the same general time.

My favorite, is when the racers try and contact the pilots. Instead of acertaining their heading and staying out of the way of the big ships, the conversation usually goes like this:

SAILBOAT: Containership off Cove Point, this is the 25 foot sailing vessel off your port bow.

SHIP PILOT: This is the Hanjun Atlantic, there are about 50 boats off my port bow. Which one are you?

SAILBOAT: Hanjun Atlantic, we are about 50 yards from your port bow... Captain, what are your intentions?

SHIP PILOT: Um... my intention is to maintain my course and speed. What are yours?

... silence

 
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In a Mills race, Lake Erie, ohh about '85 or so.

It was reading 0knts breeze, 5 am, dead still, and along comes this ore hauler (300-400')....

He was really cool about it running into the fleet, did the best he could to avoid the lot of us by changing course some, but, couldn't miss all, boats had to start up and get out of the way. No doubt to his intentions, he used a spot light to "light up" who he wanted to get moving, reuined a lot of deck naps.

 
In the Chesapeake Bay we don't have many sea condos, but we do have lots of large commercial traffic -- container ships, car carriers, and tugs.
If you ever want to hear pure mayhem, monitor Channel 13 on the VHF during the Annpolis to Solomons race or the Gov. Cup. Both races are at night and usually have 200+ boats all heading in the same direction. The Pilots and tug captains are always surprised to see all these sailboats heading for them as they head up the Bay to Baltimore despite the notice to mariners that informs them of the race... every year at the same general time.

My favorite, is when the racers try and contact the pilots. Instead of acertaining their heading and staying out of the way of the big ships, the conversation usually goes like this:

SAILBOAT: Containership off Cove Point, this is the 25 foot sailing vessel off your port bow.

SHIP PILOT: This is the Hanjun Atlantic, there are about 50 boats off my port bow. Which one are you?

SAILBOAT: Hanjun Atlantic, we are about 50 yards from your port bow... Captain, what are your intentions?

SHIP PILOT: Um... my intention is to maintain my course and speed. What are yours?

... silence
Reminds me of the infamous VHF conversation between an Aircraft Carrier and a light house.

ACC- Vessel in postition XX:xx:xx, this is Naval Vessel WXYZ, please state you intentions.

Light house- This is ABCD, suggest you alter course to stbd 90 deg.

ACC- This is the USS Bigassboat, suggest you alter course to port 90 deg.

Light house- This is Rocky Point light house, your call.

 

Foredeck Shuffle

More of a Stoic Cynic, Anarchy Sounds Exhausting
We don't know that, yet. All we know thus far is that to a shore-based observer some distance off, it looked like the guy was anchored close to the channel.
True, but consider this, this being made up.

Dropping your hook 20' outside of a tight channel with 150' of rode in 30' of water, wind starts blowing hard towards the channel. Quick trig. equation puts you where? Survey says!?! "The Suicide Seat"

The ship has right of way in the channel, COLREG calls it restricted draft in a channel, then there is tonnage. Here is what we can assume about this incident, the cruise ship didn't leave the channel or it would have grounded.

Captains and pilots make a living at following the rules, they don't want to mess with you, why mess with them?

 

Problem Child

Anarchist
Pics of the cut itself, although I'm sure the incident was in the harbor. They won't let you transit the cut when large ships coming in or out. If the locals came out to watch due to the high winds it sounds as if the ship either shouldn't have attempted it or should have had more tug assistance.

towncut.jpg

 

sailingkitty

Member
293
0
Florida
Those are great pictures.

Thanks for the clarifications on pilots, etc.

I can't speak of the Serengti's position in the channel, but I am glad that everyone was safe.

I can't imagine a more gut-wrenching, toes-tickling-the-tonsils feeling then having a cruising condo bearing down on me.

 

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