Gun Violence concentrated to a small number of US city Blocks

Blue Crab

benthivore
16,495
2,709
Outer Banks
Just gonna leave that there. No gratuitous shots of basketball courts. As is. Unadulterated.
Dead on. Couldn't have shown the guy at work?

Still, all the moaning and groaning is for naught, and especially so from the foreigners who a) have different govt'l setups, and b) can't understand the differences in scale of the populations, and c) don't have the social milieus we have in most major cities. We have more poor people than OZ has citizens.

We're stuck with what we have for awhile. Easy to say "fuck the 2nd amend" ... so very hard to do. The horses have left the barn.
 

Pertinacious Tom

Importunate Member
62,817
1,994
Punta Gorda FL

Good morning. A small number of blocks often account for most of the gun violence in U.S. cities.

16-the-morning-lede-1-articleLarge-v2.jpg
Jomarria Vaughn in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood.Jamie Kelter Davis for The New YorkTimes
Oh dear. Why did you adulterate this article with that photo, Jeff?
 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
10,377
3,471
Tasmania, Australia
As I've been saying for years, it's not the tools (guns), they've always been available. It's a progressive shift in culture that makes this sort of thing acceptable to people.

Then they get the guns and go do it. They don't just snap, pick up the gun next to their chair, bed or whatever and shoot whoever is closest. No, they PLAN it and some even make long missives explaining why, in advance.

Heavily restricting access will reduce the carnage *if* restrictions actually work, but nothing short of a culture shift will alter the mindset that thinks it's acceptable.

And you're not going to restrict access anyway - another forum I'm on involves matalwork and manufacturing. Manufacture and sales of AR type lower receivers and other parts is going GANGBUSTERS.

So - you're all fucked. Don't come here.

FKT
 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
10,377
3,471
Tasmania, Australia
that's ~98.99% bullshit. add in the sheer quantities in this cuntry and it's a flat-out moronic thing to state.
There, there - you keep right on believing that and ignore everything else.

It'll make you feel better but that's all it will do.

100 years ago full auto firearms were available over the counter. How many mass murders of school kids by school kids occurred back then?

I'm sure the significance of that will escape you though.

Your culture is FUCKED. Guns make things easier if you want to commit mass murder but that's a problem separate to the desire to actually commit such atrocities. You need to address BOTH.

FKT
 

Fah Kiew Tu

Curmudgeon, First Rank
10,377
3,471
Tasmania, Australia
Oddly, people without guns aren’t committing so many mass murders. You do get the odd Timothy McVeigh. Well, he had a gun, concealed carry, but didn’t use it.

I think it’s the people with the guns.
So why didn't it happen when full auto firearms were available in every corner gun shop? SOMETHING has changed in the last 100 years and it's not ONLY the guns.

I'm quite happy for you guys to attempt to remove firearms from the population, I just don't think you've a hope in hell of managing it.

First repeal the 2nd Amendment. Then the 1st because you can't stop people publishing gun plans otherwise, then the 4th because you've no way of confiscating the guns out there and stopping new builds otherwise. As I've posted before, 3D printers are getting better & better. Desktop CNC milling machines are cheap. Stopping manufacture is technologically difficult. Restricting the supply of ammo might be a lot more effective. Good ammo is hard to make in bulk in a backyard workshop.

Already made my position clear on semiauto centrefire firearms - very heavily restricted ownership same as full auto. But good luck enforcing it without the positive consent of the population - which you don't at present have.

I'm very happy we cracked down when we did so we don't have your problems.

FKT
 
SOMETHING has changed in the last 100 years and it's not ONLY the guns.
It couldn't have anything to do with guns being a rather common tool 100 years ago, with kids being raised to respect them, as opposed to today where they are an anomaly in most households (especially in urban areas), glorified by the media and video games, and/or the "forbidden fruit" aspect.

It MUST be the gun grabbers' fault! Or gangs.
 

3to1

Super Anarchist
There, there - you keep right on believing that and ignore everything else.

It'll make you feel better but that's all it will do.

100 years ago full auto firearms were available over the counter. How many mass murders of school kids by school kids occurred back then?

I'm sure the significance of that will escape you though.

Your culture is FUCKED. Guns make things easier if you want to commit mass murder but that's a problem separate to the desire to actually commit such atrocities. You need to address BOTH.

FKT
this cuntry, especially, is fucking bloated, toxic and it never understood the plot, I don't even give a shit about it, not really. furthermore, if the quaint concept of 'country' ceased to exist tomorrow I'd consider it another dead formality.

but how do we address the fact that a beautiful planet is being rapidly killed by a single species...
 

Mark_K

Super Anarchist
Well, it's nice that the Liberal media is finally starting to admit this and talk about it. Gun violence is being driven by an incredibly small subset of the US population.


June 16, 2022

Continue reading the main story

Good morning. A small number of blocks often account for most of the gun violence in U.S. cities.

16-the-morning-lede-1-articleLarge-v2.jpg
Jomarria Vaughn in Chicago’s Englewood neighborhood.Jamie Kelter Davis for The New YorkTimes

Highly concentrated

Thirty-five people were killed in mass shootings in Buffalo, Uvalde and Tulsa over the past few weeks, focusing national attention on America’s unique gun problem.
In that same time, around 1,800 people were killed and almost 500 wounded in nearly 1,600 other shootings in the U.S., including at a Los Angeles warehouse party over the weekend. Mass shootings account for less than 4 percent of gun homicides in a typical year, and most gun violence in the U.S. takes a different form. So I went to Chicago, where shootings are a daily occurrence in some areas, to see what more-typical gun violence looks like.
There, I met 24-year-old Jomarria Vaughn. After spending time in jail on domestic violence and weapon charges, he has tried to rebuild his life. But his past haunts him.
The last time he was on Facebook, he found out his best friend had been shot to death. He now tries to stay off the site, out of fear that posting the wrong thing could anger the wrong people — and make him a target.
In his neighborhood, he tries to avoid spending too much time “out on the block,” he said. Even if he is not a target, violence is so common there that Vaughn worries he could be hit by a stray bullet.
“I’m scared,” Vaughn told me. “I have my guard up all day.”
This is what daily life looks like for many Black Chicagoans. Across the city, the murder rate for Black people is higher than it was from the 1980s through the 1990s — a violent period that drove a nationwide push for mass incarceration. Black Chicagoans are nearly 40 times more likely to be shot to death than their white peers, according to an analysis by the University of Chicago Crime Lab.
16-morning-chicago-homicides-articleLarge.png
Source: University of Chicago Crime Lab
The violence is highly concentrated: Just 4 percent of city blocks account for the majority of shootings across Chicago, according to the Crime Lab.
Similar disparities exist across America. Black and brown neighborhoods suffer higher rates of poverty, and violence concentrates around poverty. The violence is so intensive that a few neighborhoods, blocks or people often drive most of the shootings and murders in a city or county. And this is true in both urban and rural areas, said Patrick Sharkey, a sociologist at Princeton.
The disparities have held up as murders have spiked across the country since 2020. So while the numbers are typically reported through a national lens, the reality on the ground is that a small slice of the population — disproportionately poor, Black and brown — suffers the most from it.

Two worlds

The concentration of violence has another effect: It pushes violence out of sight for most people.
In Chicago, 51 people were shot in Chicago over Memorial Day weekend — a five-year high. Almost all of the victims were on the city’s South and West Sides, which are mostly Black and brown.
Only when violence hits closer to home does it typically grab more people’s attention. That happened nationwide this year after mass shootings in schools and grocery stores, where Americans can imagine themselves or loved ones falling victim. In Chicago, public outrage over a shooting last month that killed a 16-year-old boy downtown — a richer, whiter area — prompted the mayor to impose a curfew for minors.
But that is the kind of violence that poorer, minority communities deal with daily, with little to no public attention. The vast majority of shootings never make national headlines.
Speaking to Black activists and residents in Chicago, I was struck by how they spoke almost dispassionately about the violence around them. They all had stories of dead friends and family members killed in gang shootings, episodes of domestic violence or road rage, or during petty conflicts over women — the shootings sometimes just days or weeks apart. Outside their homes, the sound of gunshots is common.
16-the-morning-lede-2-articleLarge-v2.jpg
Chicago faith leaders regularly meet to find ways to reduce violence.Jamie Kelter Davis for The New York Times

Vicious cycles

As I traveled around Chicago, the two worlds were clearly visible. Wealthier parts looked like a modern, rich city — parking meters and payment terminals built for smartphones, bustle around packed businesses, and residents on electric bikes and scooters. Poor areas were marked by disinvestment: homes in disrepair, boarded-up buildings and few to no stores.
What I saw exemplifies a vicious cycle that causes the concentration of violence in an area, experts said. Poverty leads to violence, which leads to disinvestment, which leads to more poverty and violence. Coupled with a police force that fails to solve most murders and shootings, the cycle becomes difficult to break.
By contrast, other communities have a host of social supports keeping violence at bay, including good jobs, better schools, well-kept parks and recreation centers, and responsive police.
So for most Americans, violence is something they may hear about on the news but do not deal with on a regular basis. But for people in the hardest-hit communities, violence is a fact of daily life. Like Vaughn, they come to expect it — and worry that they could be the next victim.​
Most of the shit in Chicago is driven by drug turf wars, just as it was in Prohibition with Capone.
 

βhyde

Super Anarchist
8,358
1,958
Beside Myself
There, there - you keep right on believing that and ignore everything else.

It'll make you feel better but that's all it will do.

100 years ago full auto firearms were available over the counter. How many mass murders of school kids by school kids occurred back then?

I'm sure the significance of that will escape you though.

Your culture is FUCKED. Guns make things easier if you want to commit mass murder but that's a problem separate to the desire to actually commit such atrocities. You need to address BOTH.

FKT
Serious question. What mental health policies were enacted after Port Author and the AUS gun ban?
 

Mrleft8

Super Anarchist
27,344
4,025
Suwanee River
If gun violence was concentrated to a few city blocks, children at Sandy Hook, Parkland, and Uvalde wouldn't be dead. If gun violence was concentrated to a few city blocks, people in a shopping center in Buffalo would still be shopping.
People in churches, and synagogues, and concerts and festivals would all be alive and well.....
 

Latest posts




Top